Top 35 Slang For Keep Up With – Meaning & Usage

In a world where language evolves at the speed of light, it can be a challenge to keep up with the latest slang terms. But fear not, we’ve got you covered. Our team has scoured the depths of the internet to bring you a definitive list of the most current and trending slang words that will have you fitting in with the cool kids in no time. Say goodbye to feeling out of the loop and hello to being in the know with our guide to keeping up with the latest slang.

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1. Keep in touch

This phrase means to stay in contact with someone or to keep communication open. It implies the intention to continue a relationship or friendship.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Let’s keep in touch after you move to another city.”
  • In a business setting, someone might say, “It’s important to keep in touch with our clients to maintain good relationships.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Even when you go off to college, remember to keep in touch with us.”

2. Keep tabs on

To keep tabs on someone or something means to monitor or observe them closely. It implies a level of surveillance or tracking.

  • For instance, a manager might say, “Keep tabs on the progress of the project and report any issues.”
  • In a relationship, one partner might say, “I trust you, but I still like to keep tabs on your social media activity.”
  • A parent might tell their teenager, “I want to keep tabs on your grades, so let’s set up a weekly check-in.”

3. Keep an eye on

This phrase means to watch or observe someone or something closely, often for the purpose of ensuring their safety or well-being.

  • For example, a lifeguard might say, “I’ll keep an eye on the swimmers to make sure everyone stays safe.”
  • A pet owner might say, “Can you keep an eye on my dog while I run to the store?”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Can you keep an eye on the class while I step out for a moment?”

4. Keep in the know

To keep in the know means to stay updated or informed about a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, a news anchor might say, “Stay tuned to our channel to keep in the know about the latest developments.”
  • A friend might tell you, “I’ll keep you in the know about any job openings at my company.”
  • A supervisor might say, “It’s important for all employees to keep in the know about changes in company policies.”

5. Keep your finger on the pulse

This phrase means to stay informed and aware of the current trends, developments, or changes in a particular field or industry.

  • For example, a technology enthusiast might say, “I always keep my finger on the pulse of the latest gadgets.”
  • A business owner might say, “To succeed in the market, you need to keep your finger on the pulse of consumer preferences.”
  • A journalist might say, “It’s important for reporters to keep their finger on the pulse of public opinion.”

6. Keep your ear to the ground

This phrase means to stay alert and aware of what is happening around you, especially in terms of current events or trends.

  • For example, “In order to succeed in the stock market, you have to keep your ear to the ground and stay updated on market trends.”
  • A journalist might say, “As a reporter, it’s important to keep your ear to the ground and be aware of any breaking news.”
  • Someone discussing job opportunities might advise, “If you want to find out about job openings, you should keep your ear to the ground and network with professionals in your field.”

7. Keep in step

This phrase means to stay in sync or aligned with a group or situation.

  • For instance, “During a dance performance, it’s important for all the dancers to keep in step with the music.”
  • In a military context, a drill sergeant might shout, “Soldiers, keep in step! We need to maintain a uniform march.”
  • A team leader might say, “In order to achieve our goals, we need to keep in step with each other and work together.”

8. Keep abreast of the situation

This phrase means to stay informed or up to date with the latest information or developments in a particular situation.

  • For example, “In order to make informed decisions, it’s important to keep abreast of the situation and be aware of any changes.”
  • A manager might tell their team, “Make sure to keep abreast of the situation and let me know if there are any updates.”
  • Someone discussing current events might say, “I like to read the news every morning to keep abreast of the situation and know what’s happening in the world.”

9. Keep up with the Joneses

This phrase means to strive to match or surpass the lifestyle, possessions, or achievements of one’s neighbors or peers.

  • For instance, “They bought a new luxury car just to keep up with the Joneses.”
  • In a conversation about materialism, someone might say, “Many people feel pressure to keep up with the Joneses and constantly upgrade their belongings.”
  • A financial advisor might caution against overspending, saying, “Don’t try to keep up with the Joneses if it means going into debt. Focus on your own financial goals.”

10. Keep up to speed

This phrase means to stay informed and up to date with the latest information or developments in a particular area or field.

  • For example, “In order to succeed in the tech industry, you need to keep up to speed with the latest advancements.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Make sure to keep up to speed with the reading assignments and class discussions.”
  • Someone discussing industry trends might say, “I attend conferences and workshops to keep up to speed with the latest developments in my field.”

11. Keep up to date

This phrase means to stay informed or knowledgeable about the latest information or developments in a particular subject or field.

  • For example, “I make sure to keep up to date with the latest technology trends.”
  • A person might say, “It’s important to keep up to date with the news to be well-informed.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might mention, “I always try to keep up to date with the latest trends.”

12. Keep up with the times

This expression means to stay current or adapt to the changing norms, trends, or technologies of the present time.

  • For instance, “If you want your business to thrive, you need to keep up with the times.”
  • A person discussing music might say, “It’s important for artists to keep up with the times and evolve their sound.”
  • In a discussion about parenting, someone might advise, “Parents need to keep up with the times and understand the challenges their children face.”

13. Keep up with the trends

This phrase means to stay updated and follow the latest fashion or popular styles.

  • For example, “She always dresses stylishly and keeps up with the trends.”
  • A person might say, “I love to keep up with the trends in home decor.”
  • In a conversation about social media, someone might mention, “It’s important for influencers to keep up with the trends to stay relevant.”

14. Keep up with the news

This expression means to stay updated and knowledgeable about current events and news.

  • For instance, “I read the newspaper every morning to keep up with the news.”
  • A person might say, “It’s important to keep up with the news to understand the world around us.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might mention, “I follow multiple news sources to keep up with the news from different perspectives.”

15. Keep up with the changes

This phrase means to stay aware and adjust to the ongoing changes or developments in a particular situation or environment.

  • For example, “In a fast-paced industry, it’s crucial to keep up with the changes.”
  • A person might say, “I constantly update my skills to keep up with the changes in technology.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, someone might mention, “To thrive in life, we need to keep up with the changes and embrace new opportunities.”

16. Keep up with the competition

This phrase means to stay informed about what your competitors are doing in order to maintain a similar level of success or stay ahead of them.

  • For example, a business owner might say, “We need to keep up with the competition by offering better prices.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might advise their team, “We need to train hard to keep up with the competition.”
  • A marketing professional might suggest, “We should monitor our competitors’ social media strategies to keep up with the competition.”

17. Keep up with the pace

This phrase means to maintain the same speed or level as something or someone else.

  • For instance, a runner might say, “I need to increase my training to keep up with the pace of the race.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might advise, “You need to work faster to keep up with the pace of the project.”
  • A student might feel overwhelmed and say, “The professor talks so fast, it’s hard to keep up with the pace of the lecture.”

18. Keep abreast of

This phrase means to stay informed about the latest developments or updates regarding a particular topic.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I need to keep abreast of the latest news to write an accurate article.”
  • In a business context, a manager might advise their team, “We need to keep abreast of industry trends to stay competitive.”
  • A technology enthusiast might say, “I always read tech blogs to keep abreast of the latest gadgets and innovations.”

19. Keep track of

This phrase means to monitor or maintain a record of something in order to stay organized or informed.

  • For instance, a project manager might say, “We need to keep track of the tasks to ensure everything is on schedule.”
  • In a personal context, someone might say, “I use a budgeting app to keep track of my expenses.”
  • A teacher might advise their students, “Keep track of your assignments and due dates to avoid falling behind.”

20. Keep your eyes peeled

This phrase means to stay alert and watchful for something or someone.

  • For example, a detective might say, “Keep your eyes peeled for any suspicious activity in the area.”
  • In a nature setting, a tour guide might advise their group, “Keep your eyes peeled for any wildlife sightings.”
  • A parent might caution their child, “When we’re in a crowded place, keep your eyes peeled and stay close to me.”

21. Keep the peace

This phrase means to maintain a peaceful or calm environment, often in a social or interpersonal context.

  • For example, a police officer might say, “Our job is to keep the peace and ensure everyone’s safety.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “Let’s take a step back and try to keep the peace.”
  • A mediator in a conflict might advise, “We need to find a compromise that allows both parties to keep the peace.”

22. Keep the dream alive

This expression is used to encourage someone to continue pursuing their dreams or goals, even in the face of challenges or setbacks.

  • For instance, a motivational speaker might say, “Don’t give up on your dreams. Keep the dream alive!”
  • A coach might say to their team, “We may be behind, but let’s keep the dream alive and give it our all.”
  • A friend might offer support by saying, “I know things are tough right now, but keep the dream alive and keep pushing forward.”

23. Keep the momentum going

This phrase means to continue making progress or maintaining a high level of energy or enthusiasm in order to achieve a goal.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “We’re doing great. Let’s keep the momentum going and finish strong.”
  • In a workout class, the instructor might say, “Don’t stop now. Keep the momentum going and push yourself to the next level.”
  • A project manager might encourage their team by saying, “We’re making good progress. Let’s keep the momentum going and meet our deadlines.”

24. Keep the show on the road

This phrase means to keep something moving forward or functioning smoothly, often in reference to a project, event, or plan.

  • For instance, a stage manager might say, “We had a technical glitch, but let’s keep the show on the road.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “We’ve hit a roadblock, but we need to keep the show on the road and find a solution.”
  • A teacher might remind their students, “We have a lot to cover today, so let’s stay focused and keep the show on the road.”

25. Keep the wheels turning

This expression means to keep things moving forward or to maintain a high level of productivity or efficiency.

  • For example, a manager might say, “We have a tight deadline, so let’s keep the wheels turning and get the job done.”
  • In a brainstorming session, someone might say, “We’re making great progress. Let’s keep the wheels turning and come up with more ideas.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “We’re down, but we can still win. Let’s keep the wheels turning and give it our all.”

26. Keep tabs

To keep track of or monitor someone or something. It means to stay updated or informed about a situation or person.

  • For example, “I’ll keep tabs on the progress of the project and let you know if anything changes.”
  • In a conversation about a friend’s whereabouts, one might say, “I’ll keep tabs on her and make sure she’s okay.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “I’ll be keeping tabs on your grades, so make sure you study hard.”

27. Keep in tune

To stay updated or connected with a particular topic or situation. It means to remain in touch with the latest information or developments.

  • For instance, “I make sure to keep in tune with the latest fashion trends.”
  • In a discussion about current events, one might say, “It’s important to keep in tune with the news so you know what’s happening in the world.”
  • A sports fan might say, “I always keep in tune with my favorite team’s games and scores.”

28. Keep in sync

To stay coordinated or aligned with someone or something. It means to maintain a harmonious or synchronized relationship.

  • For example, “We need to keep in sync with our team members to ensure a smooth workflow.”
  • In a conversation about a dance performance, one might say, “The dancers need to keep in sync with each other to create a visually stunning routine.”
  • A musician might say, “It’s crucial for the band members to keep in sync with the tempo and rhythm of the song.”

29. Keep a finger on the pulse

To stay informed or aware of the latest trends, developments, or changes in a particular field or industry. It means to have a good understanding of the current situation.

  • For instance, “As a marketing manager, I always keep a finger on the pulse of the industry to identify new opportunities.”
  • In a discussion about technology, one might say, “Tech enthusiasts always keep a finger on the pulse to know about the latest gadgets and innovations.”
  • A business owner might say, “In order to stay competitive, it’s important to keep a finger on the pulse of the market and adapt accordingly.”

30. Keep up appearances

To maintain a certain image or facade, often to project a positive or desirable impression to others. It means to make sure one’s outward appearance or behavior matches expectations.

  • For example, “Even though she was going through a tough time, she always tried to keep up appearances and appear happy.”
  • In a discussion about professionalism, one might say, “It’s important to dress appropriately for work and keep up appearances.”
  • A person might say, “I need to keep up appearances and act confident, even when I’m feeling nervous.”

31. Keep up the good work

This phrase is used to encourage someone to continue performing well or to acknowledge their current efforts.

  • For example, a teacher might say to a student, “You’re doing great in class. Keep up the good work!”
  • A manager might say to an employee, “You’re exceeding expectations. Keep up the good work!”
  • A coach might say to a player, “Your hard work is paying off. Keep up the good work!”

32. Keep up the momentum

This phrase is used to encourage someone or a group to maintain the current speed or progress they are making in order to achieve a goal.

  • For instance, during a team project, a leader might say, “We’re making great progress. Let’s keep up the momentum!”
  • A coach might say to a team, “We’re on a winning streak. Let’s keep up the momentum!”
  • A speaker at a conference might say, “We’ve had a great start. Let’s keep up the momentum for the rest of the event!”

33. Keep up the pace

This phrase is used to encourage someone or a group to maintain the current speed or rate at which they are working or progressing.

  • For example, during a race, a coach might say to a runner, “You’re doing great. Keep up the pace!”
  • A manager might say to a team, “We’re meeting our targets. Let’s keep up the pace!”
  • A teacher might say to students, “We’re making good progress. Let’s keep up the pace!”

34. Keep up the tempo

This phrase is used to encourage someone or a group to maintain the current rhythm or speed at which they are performing or progressing.

  • For instance, during a music rehearsal, a conductor might say, “We’re playing beautifully. Let’s keep up the tempo!”
  • A dance instructor might say to students, “You’re doing great. Keep up the tempo!”
  • A coach might say to a team, “We’re dominating the game. Let’s keep up the tempo!”

35. Keep up the spirit

This phrase is used to encourage someone or a group to maintain a positive attitude or morale in the face of challenges or difficulties.

  • For example, during a tough competition, a coach might say to athletes, “Don’t give up. Keep up the spirit!”
  • A leader might say to a team, “We’ve faced setbacks before. Let’s keep up the spirit and overcome this!”
  • A teacher might say to students, “We’re almost at the end of the semester. Keep up the spirit and finish strong!”
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