Top 30 Slang For Keeping Up – Meaning & Usage

In a fast-paced world where trends come and go in the blink of an eye, staying up-to-date can feel like a never-ending race. But fear not, because we’ve got you covered with the latest and greatest slang for keeping up. Whether you’re trying to impress your friends or simply want to navigate conversations with ease, this listicle is your go-to guide for all things trendy and current. So sit back, relax, and get ready to level up your slang game with us!

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1. Keep your finger on the pulse

To “keep your finger on the pulse” means to stay updated and well-informed about the latest trends, news, or developments in a particular field or area of interest.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “As a reporter, it’s important to keep my finger on the pulse of current events.”
  • A business professional might mention, “In order to succeed in the industry, you need to keep your finger on the pulse of market trends.”
  • A technology enthusiast might explain, “To stay ahead in the tech world, it’s crucial to keep your finger on the pulse of emerging technologies.”

2. Keep up with the Joneses

The phrase “keep up with the Joneses” means to try to match or surpass the social or economic status of one’s neighbors or peers.

  • For instance, someone might say, “They bought a new car, so now we have to keep up with the Joneses and get one too.”
  • In a discussion about consumerism, one might comment, “Many people feel pressure to keep up with the Joneses and buy the latest products.”
  • A financial advisor might warn, “Don’t fall into the trap of trying to keep up with the Joneses. Focus on your own financial goals.”

3. Keep up appearances

To “keep up appearances” means to maintain a certain image or facade, often to hide one’s true feelings or circumstances.

  • For example, someone might say, “Even though they’re struggling financially, they try to keep up appearances and act like everything is fine.”
  • In a conversation about social events, one might mention, “It’s important to dress well and keep up appearances at formal gatherings.”
  • A psychologist might discuss, “Some individuals feel the need to keep up appearances to avoid judgment or criticism from others.”

4. Keep up the good work

The phrase “keep up the good work” is used to encourage someone to continue doing well or to maintain their current level of performance.

  • For instance, a teacher might say to a student, “You’re doing great in class. Keep up the good work!”
  • In a performance review, a manager might praise an employee by saying, “You’ve been consistently meeting your targets. Keep up the good work.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “We’re halfway through the season. Let’s keep up the good work and aim for the championship.”

5. Keep up the momentum

To “keep up the momentum” means to maintain forward progress or to continue moving forward with energy and enthusiasm.

  • For example, a project manager might say, “We’ve made great progress so far. Let’s keep up the momentum and finish strong.”
  • In a discussion about personal goals, someone might mention, “It’s important to stay focused and keep up the momentum to achieve success.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage their audience by saying, “You’ve started strong. Now, let’s keep up the momentum and reach new heights.”

6. Keep up the pace

This phrase is used to encourage someone to continue moving or performing at a fast pace or in a consistent manner.

  • For example, during a race, a coach might yell, “Keep up the pace, you’re almost there!”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “We have a tight deadline, so let’s keep up the pace.”
  • When exercising, someone might motivate themselves by saying, “I need to keep up the pace if I want to meet my fitness goals.”

7. Keep up the pressure

This expression is used to encourage someone to continue applying pressure or force in a situation.

  • For instance, in a sports game, a coach might say, “Keep up the pressure, we need to score another goal!”
  • In a negotiation, one party might tell the other, “We won’t back down, so keep up the pressure.”
  • When dealing with a difficult task, someone might remind themselves, “I need to keep up the pressure if I want to succeed.”

8. Keep up the charade

This phrase is used to describe the act of continuing to pretend or deceive others, often in a social or theatrical context.

  • For example, in a play, a character might say, “We need to keep up the charade until the final act.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might comment, “They’re trying to keep up the charade of being a perfect couple.”
  • When playing a prank, a person might say, “Let’s keep up the charade and see how long they believe it.”

9. Keep up the facade

This expression refers to the act of continuing to present a false front or image, especially to deceive others.

  • For instance, in a business setting, a manager might say, “We need to keep up the facade of being successful even during tough times.”
  • In a personal relationship, someone might comment, “They’re trying to keep up the facade of being happy, but I can tell something is wrong.”
  • When hiding a secret, a person might say, “I have to keep up the facade of innocence until the truth comes out.”

10. Keep up the act

This phrase is used to describe the act of continuing to perform or pretend, often in a theatrical or social context.

  • For example, in a theater production, a director might say, “Everyone needs to keep up the act until the final curtain.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might comment, “They’re trying to keep up the act of being confident, but I can see through it.”
  • When playing a role, an actor might remind themselves, “I need to keep up the act and stay in character throughout the performance.”

11. Keeping tabs

This phrase means to monitor or keep a record of something or someone. It implies staying informed or aware of a particular situation or person.

  • For example, a parent might say, “I’m keeping tabs on my teenager’s social media activity to ensure their safety.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might say, “I’ll be keeping tabs on your progress throughout the project.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you keeping tabs on the latest season of that TV show?”

12. Keeping in step

This phrase means to stay synchronized or aligned with someone or something. It implies maintaining a similar pace or level of progress.

  • For instance, a dance instructor might say, “Make sure you’re keeping in step with the music.”
  • In a teamwork scenario, a leader might say, “Let’s make sure everyone is keeping in step with the project timeline.”
  • A coach might encourage their team by saying, “Keep pushing and keep in step with the competition.”

13. Keeping a finger on the pulse

This phrase means to stay updated or aware of the current trends, developments, or opinions in a particular field or community. It implies actively monitoring and understanding the ongoing situation.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “As a reporter, it’s important to keep a finger on the pulse of the local community.”
  • In a business context, a CEO might say, “I always keep a finger on the pulse of our industry to anticipate changes.”
  • A social media influencer might say, “I try to keep a finger on the pulse of my followers’ interests to create engaging content.”

14. Keeping track

This phrase means to monitor or keep a record of the progress, status, or whereabouts of something or someone. It implies actively staying updated or informed.

  • For instance, a project manager might say, “I’m responsible for keeping track of the team’s tasks and deadlines.”
  • In a fitness context, someone might say, “I use a fitness tracker to keep track of my daily steps and calories burned.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Are you keeping track of your homework assignments?”

15. Keeping an eye on

This phrase means to monitor or observe something or someone closely. It implies being vigilant or attentive to potential changes or developments.

  • For example, a security guard might say, “I’ll be keeping an eye on the surveillance cameras throughout the night.”
  • In a romantic context, someone might say, “I can’t help but keep an eye on my partner’s social media activity.”
  • A supervisor might tell their employee, “I’ll be keeping an eye on your performance during the trial period.”

16. Keeping watch

This phrase means to be vigilant and observant, usually in order to ensure safety or security.

  • For example, a security guard might say, “I’ll be keeping watch throughout the night.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Keep watch for any cars before crossing the street.”
  • In a neighborhood watch program, residents take turns keeping watch for any suspicious activity.
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17. Keeping in touch

This phrase means to maintain communication or contact with someone, usually to stay updated on each other’s lives or to continue a relationship.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Let’s make sure to keep in touch after we graduate.”
  • A family member might remind their relative, “Don’t forget to keep in touch while you’re traveling.”
  • A long-distance couple might use technology to keep in touch through video calls and messages.

18. Keeping a lookout

This phrase means to actively and attentively watch for something or someone, often in order to provide a warning or to be prepared for a situation.

  • For example, a lifeguard might say, “I’ll be keeping a lookout for any swimmers in distress.”
  • A hiker might ask their companion, “Can you keep a lookout for any trail markers?”
  • In a game of hide-and-seek, a player might be assigned the role of keeping a lookout for the seeker.

19. Keeping an ear to the ground

This phrase means to be attentive and aware of what is happening in a particular situation or context, often in order to stay updated or to anticipate changes.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “I need to keep an ear to the ground for any breaking news.”
  • A business owner might advise their employees, “Keep an ear to the ground for any customer feedback.”
  • In a competitive industry, professionals might emphasize the importance of keeping an ear to the ground for new trends and developments.

20. Keeping abreast of the situation

This phrase means to stay informed and knowledgeable about the current state or progress of a situation, often in order to make informed decisions or to respond appropriately.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “Let’s have regular meetings to keep abreast of the situation.”
  • A project manager might ask their team, “Are you all keeping abreast of the situation and any changes in the project plan?”
  • In a crisis, it is important for leaders to keep abreast of the situation to effectively manage and communicate.
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21. Keeping a close eye on

This phrase means to watch or observe something or someone very carefully or attentively. It implies being vigilant and paying close attention to ensure nothing is missed.

  • For example, a parent might say, “I’m keeping a close eye on my child while they play in the park.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “We need to keep a close eye on our competitors’ strategies.”
  • A detective investigating a case might say, “We’re keeping a close eye on the suspect’s movements.”

22. Keeping a watchful eye

This phrase means to be cautious and vigilant, always on the lookout for any signs of danger or trouble. It implies being aware of one’s surroundings and ready to respond if necessary.

  • For instance, a security guard might say, “I’m keeping a watchful eye on the premises.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Keep a watchful eye on your younger sibling while I’m gone.”
  • A teacher might say, “I’ll be keeping a watchful eye on the students during the field trip.”

23. Keeping your finger on the pulse

This phrase means to stay updated and well-informed about the latest trends, developments, or changes in a particular field or industry. It implies being aware of current events and having a good grasp of the prevailing situation.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “As a reporter, it’s important to keep my finger on the pulse of the news.”
  • A business owner might say, “To stay competitive, we need to keep our finger on the pulse of the market.”
  • A tech enthusiast might say, “I always keep my finger on the pulse of the latest gadgets and innovations.”

24. Keeping your ear to the ground

This phrase means to be attentive and aware of what is happening around you, especially in terms of current events, trends, or rumors. It implies being well-connected and having access to reliable sources of information.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “I keep my ear to the ground to uncover interesting stories.”
  • A politician might say, “I need to keep my ear to the ground to understand the concerns of my constituents.”
  • A job seeker might say, “I’m keeping my ear to the ground for any new job opportunities in my field.”

25. Keeping up with the times

This phrase means to stay updated and in touch with the latest trends, technologies, or social norms. It implies adapting to changes and not falling behind in terms of knowledge or skills.

  • For example, a fashion enthusiast might say, “I always try to keep up with the times and follow the latest fashion trends.”
  • A tech-savvy individual might say, “To stay relevant, it’s important to keep up with the times and embrace new technologies.”
  • A parent might say, “I need to keep up with the times to understand my children’s interests and concerns.”

26. Keep tabs on

This phrase means to closely monitor or keep track of something or someone.

  • For example, “I like to keep tabs on the latest fashion trends.”
  • In a conversation about a mutual friend, someone might say, “Have you been keeping tabs on what they’ve been up to?”
  • A supervisor might ask an employee, “Can you keep tabs on the progress of this project?”

27. Keep in step

This phrase means to stay synchronized or maintain the same pace as others.

  • For instance, during a military drill, a commander might say, “Everyone, keep in step!”
  • In a dance class, the instructor might instruct the students, “Try to keep in step with the music.”
  • A team captain might remind their teammates, “We need to keep in step if we want to win this game.”

28. Keep your ear to the ground

This phrase means to stay alert and attentive to what is happening around you.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I always keep my ear to the ground for any breaking news.”
  • In a conversation about job opportunities, someone might advise, “Keep your ear to the ground for any job openings in your field.”
  • A friend might tell you, “If you want to find out about the best deals, keep your ear to the ground.”

29. Keep track of

This phrase means to monitor or maintain a record of something or someone.

  • For instance, a project manager might say, “I need to keep track of the team’s progress.”
  • In a discussion about personal finances, someone might advise, “Keep track of your expenses to better manage your budget.”
  • A teacher might remind their students, “Make sure to keep track of your assignments and due dates.”

30. Stay woke

This phrase originated in African American Vernacular English (AAVE) and became popularized in mainstream culture. It means to stay awake or aware, particularly regarding social and political injustices.

  • For example, someone might say, “It’s important to stay woke and educate ourselves on systemic racism.”
  • In a discussion about current events, a person might comment, “Stay woke and question the narratives presented by the media.”
  • A social activist might use the phrase in a protest slogan, such as “Stay woke, fight for justice!”