Top 27 Slang For Killed – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to discussing delicate topics like death, finding the right words can be challenging. That’s why we’ve compiled a list of slang terms for “killed” to help you navigate conversations with sensitivity and understanding. From common phrases to more obscure expressions, this list will equip you with the knowledge to communicate effectively and respectfully. Join us as we explore the fascinating world of slang for “killed” and expand your vocabulary in the process.

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1. Offed

This slang term is often used to describe a deliberate act of killing someone, usually in a premeditated or intentional manner.

  • For example, in a crime novel, a character might say, “He offed his rival to gain control of the business.”
  • In a discussion about gang violence, someone might mention, “They offed him as a warning to others.”
  • A person recounting a fictional story might say, “The detective offed the main suspect to protect the innocent.”

2. Whacked

This slang term is commonly used to describe a brutal or violent act of killing, often associated with organized crime or gang-related activities.

  • For instance, in a mob movie, a character might say, “He got whacked for crossing the boss.”
  • In a discussion about true crime, someone might mention, “The victim was whacked execution-style.”
  • A person recounting a violent incident might say, “He got whacked with a baseball bat.”

3. Capped

This slang term is derived from the act of shooting someone, specifically referring to shooting them in the head or “capping” them.

  • For example, in a police drama, an officer might say, “The suspect was capped during a shootout.”
  • In a conversation about gang violence, someone might mention, “He got capped in a drive-by shooting.”
  • A person discussing self-defense might say, “If someone threatens your life, you have the right to cap them.”

4. Took out

This slang term is used to describe the act of removing or eliminating someone from a situation or existence, often through lethal means.

  • For instance, in a spy thriller, a character might say, “He took out the enemy agent before he could reveal any secrets.”
  • In a discussion about military operations, someone might mention, “The sniper took out several enemy soldiers.”
  • A person recounting a personal experience might say, “I took out the intruder to protect my family.”

5. Eliminated

This slang term is used to emphasize the act of completely removing or eradicating someone, often implying a permanent or fatal outcome.

  • For example, in a crime documentary, a narrator might say, “The witness was eliminated to prevent them from testifying.”
  • In a conversation about assassination, someone might mention, “Political leaders throughout history have been eliminated by their enemies.”
  • A person discussing the consequences of violence might say, “Once a person is eliminated, there’s no going back.”

6. Dispatched

This term is often used to describe a situation where someone is killed or taken out of the picture, usually in a quick and efficient manner. It implies a sense of finality and efficiency in the act of killing.

  • For example, in a spy thriller, a character might say, “He was dispatched before he could reveal the secrets.”
  • In a crime novel, the detective might comment, “The hitman dispatched his target with a single shot.”
  • A military officer might report, “The enemy combatants were swiftly dispatched by our troops.”

7. Liquidated

This term is often used to describe the act of killing someone, especially when it involves getting rid of a threat or an enemy. It implies a sense of complete eradication or annihilation.

  • For instance, a gangster might say, “He was liquidated to send a message to the others.”
  • In a political thriller, a character might mention, “The dictator ordered his opponents to be liquidated.”
  • A crime boss might discuss, “Liquidating the competition is necessary for our business to thrive.”

8. Erased

This term is often used metaphorically to describe the act of killing someone, as if they are being completely erased from existence. It implies a sense of thoroughness and removal.

  • For example, a hitman might say, “He needs to be erased before he becomes a liability.”
  • In a dystopian novel, a character might comment, “The government erases anyone who speaks out against them.”
  • A spy might mention, “Our mission is to erase any evidence of our presence.”

9. Neutralized

This term is often used to describe the act of killing someone, especially when it involves putting an end to a threat or a dangerous situation. It implies a sense of rendering someone powerless or ineffective.

  • For instance, a police officer might report, “The suspect was neutralized after a brief standoff.”
  • In a military operation, a commander might say, “Our objective is to neutralize the enemy forces.”
  • A superhero might declare, “I will neutralize any villains who threaten the city.”

10. Snuffed

This term is often used to describe the act of killing someone, as if their life has been abruptly and violently extinguished, like blowing out a candle. It implies a sense of sudden and brutal termination.

  • For example, a detective might say, “The victim was snuffed out in cold blood.”
  • In a horror movie, a character might comment, “The monster snuffed out its victims without mercy.”
  • A gang member might boast, “Snuffing out our rivals is how we establish dominance.”

11. Croaked

This slang term refers to someone who has died. It is often used informally and with a touch of humor.

  • For example, “He croaked after eating that spicy chili.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might say, “If you cross him, you’ll end up croaked.”
  • A comedian might make a joke like, “I’m so bad at cooking that I almost croaked my entire family.”

12. Bumped off

To “bump off” someone means to kill them, usually in a planned or intentional manner.

  • For instance, in a detective story, a detective might say, “I think the victim was bumped off by someone they knew.”
  • In a discussion about crime, someone might say, “Gangsters often use hired hitmen to bump off their rivals.”
  • A fan of crime movies might comment, “I love how the mob boss always finds creative ways to bump off his enemies.”

13. Rubbed out

To “rub out” someone means to kill them, often with the implication of erasing or eliminating them from existence.

  • For example, in a spy thriller, a character might say, “Our mission is to rub out the target and leave no trace.”
  • In a discussion about organized crime, someone might say, “Witnesses who cooperate with the police often end up getting rubbed out.”
  • A fan of action movies might comment, “The assassin’s job is to rub out the target and disappear without a trace.”

14. Done away with

To “do away with” someone means to kill or eliminate them, often in a deliberate or calculated manner.

  • For instance, in a psychological thriller, a character might say, “I had to do away with him to protect myself.”
  • In a discussion about political intrigue, someone might say, “Dictators often do away with their opponents to maintain power.”
  • A fan of mystery novels might comment, “The detective’s job is to uncover the truth about who did away with the victim.”

15. Done in

To “do in” someone means to kill or finish them off, often with the implication of causing their demise or defeat.

  • For example, in a war movie, a soldier might say, “We did in the enemy and secured the victory.”
  • In a discussion about survival skills, someone might say, “Knowing how to do in your prey is essential for hunting.”
  • A fan of action games might comment, “I love the satisfaction of doing in the final boss and completing the game.”

16. Iced

This slang term refers to someone being killed, often in a violent or unexpected manner. It can also imply a sense of surprise or shock at the act of killing.

  • For example, in a crime novel, a detective might say, “The victim was iced with a single gunshot to the head.”
  • In a conversation about a gang war, someone might mention, “They iced three members of the rival gang last night.”
  • A character in a movie might exclaim, “He got iced by the mob for crossing them!”

17. Smoked

This slang term means to kill someone, typically by shooting them. It can also imply a sense of finality or permanence in the act of killing.

  • For instance, in a crime drama, a character might say, “He smoked the informant to ensure his silence.”
  • In a discussion about a warzone, someone might mention, “The sniper smoked three enemy soldiers from a distance.”
  • A gangster in a movie might boast, “I’ve smoked more fools than I can count!”

18. Sleeping with the fishes

This slang phrase refers to someone who has been killed and their body disposed of in a body of water, often with the use of concrete shoes or weights. It implies a sense of finality and secrecy in the act of killing.

  • For example, in a crime novel, a detective might say, “He ended up sleeping with the fishes after double-crossing the mob.”
  • In a conversation about a mafia hit, someone might mention, “They made sure he was sleeping with the fishes to send a message.”
  • A character in a movie might warn, “Cross the boss and you’ll be sleeping with the fishes!”

19. Swimming with concrete shoes

This slang phrase refers to someone who has been killed and their body disposed of in a body of water, usually by tying concrete shoes to their feet to make the body sink. It implies a sense of permanence and secrecy in the act of killing.

  • For instance, in a crime drama, a character might say, “He’s swimming with concrete shoes now, thanks to the mob.”
  • In a discussion about organized crime, someone might mention, “They made sure he was swimming with concrete shoes to ensure he wouldn’t be found.”
  • A gangster in a movie might threaten, “Step out of line again and you’ll be swimming with concrete shoes!”

20. Killed it

This slang phrase has a different meaning than the previous terms. It is used to indicate that someone has done something exceptionally well or succeeded in a particular task or performance.

  • For example, after watching a dance performance, someone might say, “She really killed it on the dance floor!”
  • In a discussion about a sports game, a fan might exclaim, “Our team killed it in the last quarter!”
  • A judge on a talent show might comment, “You absolutely killed it with that performance!”

21. Killed off

This phrase is often used to describe the act of permanently removing or eliminating someone or something. It can refer to the death of a character in a story or the complete destruction of an idea or concept.

  • For example, in a TV show, a character might say, “They killed off my favorite character in the last episode!”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We need to kill off this product line as it’s not performing well.”
  • A writer might discuss a plot twist by saying, “I decided to kill off the main antagonist in the final chapter.”

22. Taken out

This phrase is often used to describe the act of removing or getting rid of someone or something, usually in a permanent or forceful manner. It can have violent connotations and is commonly associated with the act of killing.

  • For instance, in a spy movie, a character might say, “We need to take out the enemy agent before they reveal our secrets.”
  • In a gangster film, a character might order a hit by saying, “Take him out, no witnesses.”
  • A military commander might strategize by saying, “We need to take out their artillery before advancing.”

23. Knocked off

This phrase is often used to describe the act of killing someone, usually in a sudden or unexpected manner. It can also refer to the act of stealing or robbing someone or something.

  • For example, in a crime novel, a detective might say, “The victim was knocked off in broad daylight.”
  • In a conversation about a theft, someone might say, “They knocked off the jewelry store and got away with a fortune.”
  • A character in a comedy might say, “I knocked off my ex-boyfriend’s new girlfriend’s favorite vase by accident.”

24. Slain

This word is often used to describe the act of killing someone, usually in a violent or brutal manner. It is an old-fashioned term that is commonly used in literature or poetry.

  • For instance, in a fantasy novel, a warrior might say, “I have slain the dragon and saved the village.”
  • In a historical context, someone might say, “Countless soldiers were slain during the battle.”
  • A poet might write, “The hero was slain, his name forever etched in history.”

25. Put to rest

This phrase is often used metaphorically to describe the act of bringing something to an end or resolving a problem. It can also refer to the act of killing or burying someone or something.

  • For example, in a political debate, a candidate might say, “It’s time to put this issue to rest and focus on more pressing matters.”
  • In a horror movie, a character might say, “We need to put this evil spirit to rest once and for all.”
  • A person discussing a deceased loved one might say, “We finally laid them to rest after a long battle with illness.”

26. Annihilated

This slang term is used to describe something or someone being utterly and completely destroyed or killed.

  • For example, “The opposing team was annihilated in the championship game.”
  • A person might say, “I annihilated that pizza, it was so delicious.”
  • In a video game, a player might boast, “I just annihilated my opponents in that match.”

27. Extinguished

This slang term refers to putting an end to something or someone, often in a permanent or final manner.

  • For instance, “His dreams of becoming a singer were extinguished after the accident.”
  • A person might say, “I need to extinguish my debts before I can start saving.”
  • In a crime novel, a detective might say, “I will not rest until I have extinguished the criminal’s reign of terror.”
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