Top 42 Slang For Knight – Meaning & Usage

Knights, with their chivalry and valor, have always captured our imagination and inspired tales of heroism. But have you ever stopped to wonder how the modern world refers to these noble warriors? Join us as we uncover the top slang terms for knights that are sure to add a fun twist to your understanding of these legendary figures. Get ready to embark on a linguistic adventure and expand your vocabulary with this exciting listicle!

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1. Sir

This term is used to address a knight or a man of high social standing. It is a polite and respectful way to refer to someone, particularly in formal settings.

  • For example, “Good evening, Sir. How may I assist you?”
  • In a historical context, a knight might be addressed as “Sir [Last Name].”
  • A person might say, “Excuse me, Sir, but do you have a moment to spare?”

2. Knight in shining armor

This phrase refers to a person, often a man, who is brave, noble, and comes to the rescue or defends someone in a difficult situation.

  • For instance, “She always dreamed of finding her knight in shining armor.”
  • In a romantic context, someone might say, “I’m still waiting for my knight in shining armor to sweep me off my feet.”
  • A person might describe someone as their “knight in shining armor” if they provided unwavering support during a tough time.

3. White Knight

This term is used to describe someone who intervenes or comes to the aid of others, particularly in online discussions or debates.

  • For example, “He always jumps in to defend people in arguments. He’s such a white knight.”
  • In a gaming context, a player might be called a “white knight” if they constantly defend a game or its developers.
  • A person might say, “Don’t be a white knight and try to solve everyone’s problems. Let them handle it on their own.”

4. Lancelot

Lancelot is one of the Knights of the Round Table in the Arthurian legend. He is often portrayed as a brave and skilled knight, known for his affair with Queen Guinevere.

  • For instance, “Lancelot was considered one of the greatest knights of King Arthur’s court.”
  • In literature and film adaptations, Lancelot is often depicted as a handsome and romantic character.
  • A person might say, “He’s as chivalrous as Lancelot himself.”

5. Paladin

In fantasy literature and role-playing games, a paladin is a knight or warrior who upholds justice, fights evil, and follows a strict code of conduct.

  • For example, “The paladin rode into battle, his holy sword gleaming in the sunlight.”
  • In gaming communities, players might discuss the best paladin builds or strategies.
  • A person might say, “He’s like a real-life paladin, always standing up for what’s right.”

6. Cavalier

A cavalier refers to a gallant and chivalrous soldier, often associated with the knights of old. The term can also be used to describe someone who is carefree and nonchalant.

  • For example, in a historical context, one might say, “The cavaliers fought bravely on the battlefield.”
  • In a modern sense, a person might be described as “cavalier” if they display a casual or dismissive attitude towards something important.
  • One might ask, “Why is he so cavalier about his responsibilities?”

7. Gallant

Gallant is an adjective used to describe someone who is brave, noble, and chivalrous, often associated with the qualities of a knight. It can also refer to someone who is attentive and courteous towards women.

  • For instance, in a fairy tale, the prince might be described as “a gallant knight.”
  • In a romantic context, one might say, “He was a gallant suitor, always opening doors for her.”
  • The term can also be used to describe a heroic act, such as “a gallant rescue.”

8. Chevalier

Chevalier is a French term for knight, often used to refer to a knight of the highest order. It can also be used to describe a gentleman or a man who is gallant towards women.

  • For example, in medieval literature, a chevalier is often depicted as a heroic figure.
  • In a formal setting, one might address a man as “chevalier” as a mark of respect.
  • The term can also be used in a more casual sense to describe a man who is chivalrous and courteous.

9. Champion

A champion is someone who is victorious in a battle or competition. In the context of knights, it refers to a knight who has achieved great success and is highly skilled in combat.

  • For instance, in a tournament, the champion is the knight who emerges as the winner.
  • In a figurative sense, a person might be described as a champion if they consistently excel in a certain field or cause.
  • One might say, “He is a champion of human rights.”

10. Defender

A defender is someone who protects or supports someone or something. In the context of knights, it refers to a knight who defends the weak and upholds justice.

  • For example, a defender of the realm is a knight who is sworn to protect the kingdom.
  • In a modern sense, one might say, “She is a defender of animal rights.”
  • The term can also be used to describe someone who defends their beliefs or principles, such as “a defender of free speech.”

11. Guardian

A guardian is someone who protects or defends someone or something. In the context of knights, a guardian refers to a knight who is responsible for protecting a specific person or place.

  • For example, “The guardian knight stood watch outside the castle gates.”
  • In a discussion about medieval warfare, someone might mention, “The role of a guardian knight was crucial in ensuring the safety of the kingdom.”
  • A fantasy novel might describe a character as, “A fearless guardian knight sworn to protect the princess.”

12. Protector

A protector is someone who safeguards or shields someone or something from harm. In the context of knights, a protector refers to a knight who is dedicated to defending the weak or vulnerable.

  • For instance, “The protector knight shielded the villagers from bandit attacks.”
  • In a conversation about chivalry, someone might say, “A true knight is a protector of the innocent.”
  • A historical account might mention, “During times of war, protectors were often tasked with guarding the kingdom’s borders.”

13. Squire

A squire is a young man who serves as an assistant to a knight. They perform various tasks such as carrying the knight’s armor, caring for their horse, and learning the skills necessary to become a knight themselves.

  • For example, “The squire eagerly helped the knight don his armor.”
  • In a discussion about medieval training, someone might mention, “Squires would accompany knights on their quests to gain experience.”
  • A fantasy novel might introduce a character as, “A brave squire determined to prove their worth and become a knight.”

14. Crusader

A crusader is a knight who fought in the medieval religious wars known as the Crusades. They were driven by a desire to reclaim holy land from non-Christian forces and were often seen as highly devout and brave warriors.

  • For instance, “The crusader knight embarked on a perilous journey to the Holy Land.”
  • In a conversation about historical conflicts, someone might say, “The Crusaders were known for their distinctive armor and battle tactics.”
  • A historical account might mention, “Crusader knights were motivated by a strong sense of religious duty.”

15. Shieldmaiden

A shieldmaiden is a female warrior who fights alongside knights. While not as commonly used as other terms, it refers to a woman who is skilled in combat and fights with bravery and honor.

  • For example, “The shieldmaiden stood strong in the face of the enemy, defending her comrades.”
  • In a discussion about gender roles in medieval society, someone might mention, “Shieldmaidens challenged traditional expectations by taking up arms.”
  • A fantasy novel might portray a character as, “A fearless shieldmaiden who fought with unmatched skill and courage.”

16. Swordsman

A swordsman is a skilled fighter who specializes in using a sword as their primary weapon. They are known for their precision, technique, and mastery of swordplay.

  • For example, in historical literature, a character might be described as a “fearsome swordsman.”
  • In a fantasy novel, a protagonist might seek training from a wise swordsman to learn the art of combat.
  • In a video game, a player might choose to play as a swordsman class character, wielding various types of swords.
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17. Armiger

An armiger is a person who is entitled to bear a coat of arms, which is a heraldic design used to identify individuals or families. This term is often associated with knights or individuals of noble birth who have the right to display their family’s coat of arms.

  • For instance, a person attending a medieval reenactment might be referred to as an armiger if they are dressed in knightly armor and carrying a shield with a coat of arms.
  • In a historical context, an armiger might be recognized by their unique heraldic symbols displayed on their armor or clothing.
  • A person studying genealogy might discover that their ancestors were armigers, indicating a noble lineage.

18. Herald

A herald is a person who announces or proclaims news, events, or messages. In the context of knights, a herald is responsible for making formal announcements and declarations on behalf of a noble or knightly order.

  • For example, a herald might announce the arrival of a knight at a tournament, proclaiming their name, titles, and accomplishments.
  • In medieval times, a herald might carry a banner or flag with the coat of arms of a knight or noble, serving as a visual representation of their identity.
  • In a fantasy novel, a herald might be a mystical being with the power to foretell prophecies and deliver important messages to knights and heroes.

19. Page

A page is a young trainee or assistant to a knight. Pages are typically young boys who are learning the ways of knighthood and serving a knight as part of their training and education.

  • For instance, in historical literature, a page might be described as a “wide-eyed youth” eager to prove their worth and learn the skills of chivalry.
  • In a medieval setting, a page might be responsible for tasks such as caring for the knight’s armor, running errands, or attending to the knight’s horse.
  • In a fantasy role-playing game, a player might start their journey as a page, gradually progressing to become a fully-fledged knight.

20. Esquire

Esquire is a title used to address a gentleman who is below the rank of a knight but is of a higher social standing than a commoner. It is often used as a courtesy title for someone who holds a position of respect or authority.

  • For example, in formal correspondence, a person might be addressed as “John Smith, Esquire” to recognize their status as a gentleman.
  • In legal contexts, an attorney might be referred to as “Esquire” to indicate their professional qualifications and standing.
  • In historical settings, a person might be granted the title of “Esquire” as an honor for their service or achievements.

21. Gallahad

Gallahad is a term used to refer to a knight who embodies the ideals of chivalry and heroism. It is often used to describe a knight who is brave, noble, and honorable in his actions.

  • For example, in Arthurian legends, Sir Galahad is known as the purest and most virtuous knight.
  • In a discussion about medieval knights, one might say, “Gallahad was the epitome of a true knight.”
  • A fan of fantasy literature might describe a character as “a gallahad-like figure,“a gallahad-like figure, always fighting for justice and protecting the weak.”

22. Knight Errant

Knight errant refers to a knight who travels in search of adventures and noble quests. These knights are often portrayed as wandering, chivalrous warriors who right wrongs and protect the innocent.

  • For instance, in Don Quixote, the main character sees himself as a knight errant, embarking on quests to fight injustice.
  • In a discussion about medieval literature, one might mention, “Knight errants were a popular theme in chivalric romances.”
  • A fan of fantasy role-playing games might create a character who is a “knight errant,“knight errant, always ready to embark on a new quest.”

23. Jouster

Jouster refers to a knight who participates in jousting, a medieval sport in which two knights on horseback charge at each other with lances. Jousting was a popular form of entertainment and a way for knights to showcase their skills and bravery.

  • For example, in a renaissance fair, you might see knights dressed in armor and engaging in a jousting competition.
  • In a discussion about medieval tournaments, one might say, “Jousters were highly skilled in the art of jousting.”
  • A fan of medieval history might visit a jousting event and comment, “The jousters displayed incredible horsemanship and courage.”

24. Templar

Templar refers to a member of the Knights Templar, a medieval Christian military order. The Templars were known for their religious devotion and their role in protecting Christian pilgrims during the Crusades.

  • For instance, in historical fiction novels, Templars are often portrayed as brave warriors fighting for their faith.
  • In a discussion about the Crusades, one might mention, “The Templars were one of the most powerful and influential orders of knights.”
  • A fan of conspiracy theories might be interested in the legends surrounding the Templars and say, “The Templars’ secrets still fascinate people today.”

25. Knight-Errantry

Knight-errantry is a term used to describe the practice or lifestyle of being a knight errant. It refers to the act of traveling in search of adventures and performing acts of chivalry and heroism.

  • For example, in medieval literature, stories often revolve around the knight-errantry of the main character.
  • In a discussion about the code of chivalry, one might say, “Knight-errantry was an important aspect of the knightly ideal.”
  • A fan of fantasy novels might describe a book as “a thrilling tale of knight-errantry,“a thrilling tale of knight-errantry, filled with epic quests and noble deeds.”

26. Banneret

A banneret is a knight who has been granted the right to display a banner or flag on the battlefield. The term is often used to refer to a brave and skilled warrior.

  • For example, in medieval literature, a banneret might be described as “a valiant knight who leads his troops into battle.”
  • In a discussion about military ranks, someone might say, “A banneret is a knight who has proven his valor on the field of battle.”
  • A historian might explain, “During the Middle Ages, bannerets were often given command of a group of knights and soldiers.”

27. Knight Bachelor

A knight bachelor is a knight who has not been awarded a higher rank or title. The term is often used to refer to a knight who is not part of a knightly order or nobility and is not married.

  • For instance, in historical fiction, a knight bachelor might be portrayed as “a lone warrior who fights for justice.”
  • In a discussion about chivalry, someone might say, “A knight bachelor is a knight who has not sworn allegiance to a lord or king.”
  • A medieval enthusiast might explain, “Knights bachelor were often seen as independent and free to pursue their own quests.”

28. Knight Commander

A knight commander is a high-ranking knight who holds command over other knights. The term is often used to refer to a knight who has been given authority and leadership within a knightly order or military organization.

  • For example, in a fantasy novel, a knight commander might be described as “a formidable warrior who leads his troops into battle.”
  • In a discussion about military hierarchy, someone might say, “A knight commander is one of the highest-ranking positions a knight can achieve.”
  • A historian might explain, “Knight commanders were often responsible for training and overseeing other knights in combat.”

29. Knight Templar

A Knight Templar is a member of the medieval Christian military order known as the Knights Templar. The term is often used to refer to a warrior monk who combines the skills of a knight and the devotion of a religious order.

  • For instance, in historical novels, a Knight Templar might be portrayed as “a fierce warrior who fights for both his faith and his comrades.”
  • In a discussion about the Crusades, someone might say, “The Knight Templars were renowned for their bravery and dedication to their cause.”
  • A history enthusiast might explain, “The Knight Templars were a highly trained and disciplined order of knights who played a significant role in medieval warfare.”

30. Knight of the Round Table

A Knight of the Round Table is a legendary knight from the Arthurian legends who was chosen to sit at King Arthur’s round table. The term is often used to refer to a noble and virtuous knight who embodies the ideals of chivalry and honor.

  • For example, in Arthurian literature, a Knight of the Round Table might be described as “a loyal and courageous knight who fights for justice and the kingdom.”
  • In a discussion about medieval legends, someone might say, “The Knights of the Round Table were the epitome of chivalry and knightly virtue.”
  • A fan of Arthurian mythology might explain, “Each Knight of the Round Table had their own unique quest and role in King Arthur’s court.”

31. Knight-At-Arms

A knight who is fully armed and trained for battle. The term “knight-at-arms” refers to a knight who is ready to fight in combat, equipped with armor and weapons.

  • For instance, in medieval times, a knight-at-arms would ride into battle on horseback, wielding a sword or lance.
  • In a discussion about medieval warfare, one might mention, “The knight-at-arms was the backbone of the army.”
  • A history enthusiast might say, “Becoming a knight-at-arms required years of training and dedication.”

32. Knight Banneret

A knight who leads a group of soldiers or knights under their own banner. The term “knight banneret” refers to a knight who has been granted the honor of leading a military force.

  • For example, in medieval times, a knight banneret would lead their troops into battle, carrying a banner that represented their allegiance.
  • A discussion about military tactics might mention, “A knight banneret had the authority to command their own group of knights.”
  • A history buff might note, “Being made a knight banneret was a prestigious honor bestowed by the king.”

33. Knight of Malta

A knight who is a member of the Order of Malta, also known as the Knights Hospitaller. The term “knight of Malta” refers to a knight who has taken vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience and serves in a religious military order.

  • For instance, during the Crusades, the knights of Malta provided medical care to the wounded and defended the Holy Land.
  • In a discussion about medieval orders, one might say, “The knights of Malta were known for their dedication to both military and humanitarian efforts.”
  • A history enthusiast might mention, “Becoming a knight of Malta required a commitment to serving others.”

34. Knight of the Garter

A knight who is a member of the Order of the Garter, an exclusive and prestigious British order of chivalry. The term “knight of the garter” refers to a knight who has been recognized for their exceptional service and loyalty.

  • For example, the Order of the Garter is bestowed by the British monarch and includes both knights and ladies.
  • In a discussion about British honors, one might mention, “Being made a knight of the garter is one of the highest honors in the country.”
  • A history buff might note, “The order’s emblem, a garter, symbolizes unity and loyalty among its members.”

35. Knight of the Bath

A knight who has been honored with the title of “knight of the bath” as part of a British ceremonial tradition. The term “knight of the bath” refers to a knight who has participated in a ritual bath before their investiture.

  • For instance, the Order of the Bath is one of the oldest British orders of chivalry and is bestowed by the monarch.
  • In a discussion about British ceremonies, one might say, “The investiture of a knight of the bath involves a symbolic cleansing ritual.”
  • A history enthusiast might mention, “Knights of the bath have historically been recognized for their military or civil service.”

36. Lancer

A lancer is a knight who specializes in fighting while mounted on a horse and wielding a lance. They are known for their skill in charging at enemies and using the momentum of the horse to deliver powerful blows.

  • For example, during a jousting tournament, a lancer might be seen charging at a target with his lance.
  • In medieval battles, lancers were often used to break through enemy lines with their powerful charges.
  • A historical reenactor might choose to portray a lancer to showcase the skills and equipment of knights in battle.
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37. Chivalry

Chivalry refers to the code of conduct followed by knights during the medieval period. It emphasized virtues such as honor, courage, and loyalty, and dictated how knights should behave towards others, especially women.

  • For instance, a knight would be expected to protect the weak and defenseless, and to treat women with respect and courtesy.
  • In literature, stories often depict knights on quests to uphold the ideals of chivalry and protect the innocent.
  • Today, the term “chivalry” is sometimes used to describe a gentlemanly or courteous behavior.

38. Blackguard

A blackguard is a term used to describe a knight or soldier who is considered dishonorable, untrustworthy, or of low moral character. It is often used as an insult to question someone’s integrity or character.

  • For example, a knight who breaks the code of chivalry and engages in dishonorable acts may be called a blackguard.
  • In a medieval tale, a villainous character might be referred to as a blackguard.
  • The term can also be used more broadly to describe any person who behaves in a dishonorable or immoral manner.

39. Errant

An errant knight is a knight who travels from place to place, often in search of adventure or to prove their valor. They are known for their chivalrous deeds and willingness to help those in need.

  • For instance, in literature, knights like Don Quixote are often portrayed as errant knights on a quest for glory.
  • In a medieval setting, a noble might hire an errant knight to protect their lands or go on a specific mission.
  • The term “errant” can also be used metaphorically to describe someone who is aimlessly wandering or searching for something.
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40. Man-at-arms

A man-at-arms is a term used to describe a professional soldier who serves as a knight. They were typically well-trained and equipped warriors who fought on foot and played a crucial role in medieval warfare.

  • For example, a man-at-arms would wear heavy armor and wield weapons like swords, axes, or maces.
  • In a battle, man-at-arms would form the backbone of a knight’s retinue, providing support and protection.
  • The term can also be used more broadly to refer to any professional soldier who serves in a similar role, regardless of their noble status.

41. Noble

A term used to describe someone who possesses honorable and virtuous qualities, often associated with knights and the code of chivalry.

  • For example, “He acted in a noble manner by defending the weak.”
  • A person might refer to someone as “a noble knight” to emphasize their bravery and honor.
  • In a fantasy novel, a character might say, “Only a noble knight can wield the legendary sword.”

42. Gallows

Although not directly related to knights, the term “gallows” can be used metaphorically to refer to a knight’s battlefield or the place where they prove their worth through combat.

  • For instance, “He proved himself on the gallows of the tournament field.”
  • In a medieval-themed game, a character might say, “I seek glory on the gallows of battle.”
  • A writer might describe a knight’s training ground as “the gallows where they honed their skills.”