Top 62 Slang For Large-Amount – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to describing a large amount of something, the English language offers a plethora of colorful slang terms that add a touch of flair to everyday conversation. From money to food to partying, we’ve compiled a list of the most popular slang for large amounts that will have you sounding like a seasoned linguist in no time. So get ready to amp up your vocabulary and impress your friends with these vibrant expressions!

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1. Tons

This term is used to describe a significant or excessive amount of something. It is often used informally to emphasize the abundance of a particular item or substance.

  • For example, “I have tons of homework to do tonight.”
  • Someone might say, “There were tons of people at the concert last night.”
  • A person discussing their workload might complain, “I have tons of emails to respond to.”

2. Loads

This slang term is used to describe a large or substantial quantity of something. It is commonly used to emphasize the magnitude or volume of a particular object or activity.

  • For instance, “I have loads of laundry to do this weekend.”
  • A person might say, “I ate loads of pizza at the party.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “There were loads of presents under the Christmas tree.”

3. Heaps

This slang term is used to describe a plentiful or abundant quantity of something. It is often used to emphasize the size or extent of a particular object or situation.

  • For example, “There are heaps of books on the shelf.”
  • A person might say, “I have heaps of clothes that need to be sorted.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “We received heaps of compliments on our performance.”

4. Oodles

This term is used to describe an abundant or plentiful amount of something. It is often used informally to emphasize the surplus or surplus of a particular item or substance.

  • For instance, “There are oodles of noodles in this dish.”
  • A person might say, “I have oodles of free time this weekend.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “There were oodles of presents at the birthday party.”

5. Masses

This slang term is used to describe a significant or substantial quantity of something. It is often used to emphasize the multitude or volume of a particular object or group.

  • For example, “There were masses of people at the protest.”
  • A person might say, “I have masses of paperwork to complete.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “There were masses of food at the buffet.”

6. Boatload

This term is used to describe a quantity that is considered to be very large or excessive.

  • For example, “We have a boatload of work to do before the deadline.”
  • A person might say, “I have a boatload of homework to finish tonight.”
  • In a discussion about a successful business venture, someone might mention, “They made a boatload of money from that deal.”

7. Piles

This slang term refers to a large number or amount of something.

  • For instance, “There were piles of presents under the Christmas tree.”
  • A person might say, “I have piles of laundry to do this weekend.”
  • In a conversation about a busy day at work, someone might mention, “I have piles of paperwork to finish before the end of the day.”

8. Mountains

This term is used to describe a significant quantity or number of something.

  • For example, “She has mountains of clothes in her closet.”
  • A person might say, “I have mountains of paperwork to sort through.”
  • In a discussion about a successful harvest, someone might mention, “They harvested mountains of corn this year.”

9. Plethora

This term refers to an abundance or excess of something.

  • For instance, “The store has a plethora of options to choose from.”
  • A person might say, “I have a plethora of books to read.”
  • In a conversation about a buffet, someone might mention, “They have a plethora of food choices.”

10. Myriad

This slang term describes a countless or extremely large number of something.

  • For example, “There are a myriad of reasons why people love to travel.”
  • A person might say, “I have a myriad of tasks to complete today.”
  • In a discussion about the stars, someone might mention, “There are a myriad of galaxies in the universe.”

11. Barrel

When referring to a large amount, “barrel” is often used metaphorically. It can refer to a large quantity of something, similar to the capacity of a barrel.

  • For example, “He drank a barrel of coffee to stay awake all night.”
  • In a conversation about food, someone might say, “I ate a whole barrel of popcorn at the movies.”
  • A person talking about work might mention, “We have a barrel of paperwork to finish before the deadline.”

12. Truckload

When something is described as a “truckload,” it means there is an enormous amount of it, as much as a truck can carry.

  • For instance, “She has a truckload of clothes in her closet.”
  • In a discussion about groceries, someone might say, “I bought a truckload of snacks for the party.”
  • A person talking about work might mention, “We received a truckload of new orders today.”

13. Yard

In slang, “yard” is often used to describe a large amount of something. It is similar to the size of a yard, which is a unit of measurement.

  • For example, “He has a yard of candy bars in his backpack.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “I spent a yard of cash on that new gadget.”
  • A person talking about possessions might mention, “I have a yard of shoes in my closet.”

14. Pack

When something is described as a “pack,” it means there is a large number of it, similar to a pack of cards or a pack of wolves.

  • For instance, “He has a pack of friends who always hang out together.”
  • In a discussion about cigarettes, someone might say, “He smokes a pack a day.”
  • A person talking about work might mention, “We have a pack of assignments to complete before the deadline.”

15. Ocean

When something is referred to as an “ocean,” it means there is an immense or vast amount of it, similar to the size of an ocean.

  • For example, “She has an ocean of patience when dealing with difficult customers.”
  • In a conversation about data, someone might say, “We collected an ocean of information for our research.”
  • A person talking about time might mention, “I have an ocean of free time this weekend to relax.”

16. Host

When used in slang, “host” refers to a large amount or quantity of something. It is often used to describe an abundance or a multitude of items or people.

  • For example, “We have a host of options to choose from for dinner.”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might say, “There was a host of people at the event.”
  • A person discussing a sale might mention, “They have a host of items available at discounted prices.”

17. Collection

In slang, “collection” is used to describe a large gathering or accumulation of something. It implies a significant quantity or number of items or people.

  • For instance, “He has a collection of cars in his garage.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might mention, “The museum has a collection of famous paintings.”
  • A person describing a group of friends might say, “We had a collection of people at the party last night.”

18. Copious amount

When used in slang, “copious amount” refers to a large, abundant, or plentiful quantity of something. It suggests an excess or surplus of items or substances.

  • For example, “She drank a copious amount of water after her workout.”
  • In a conversation about food, someone might say, “The buffet offers a copious amount of options.”
  • A person discussing rainfall might mention, “We received a copious amount of rain last night.”

19. Generous amount

In slang, “generous amount” is used to describe a substantial or ample quantity of something. It implies a significant or satisfactory amount.

  • For instance, “He poured a generous amount of sauce on his pasta.”
  • In a discussion about ingredients, someone might mention, “The recipe calls for a generous amount of sugar.”
  • A person describing a gift might say, “She gave me a generous amount of money for my birthday.”

20. Great quantity

When used in slang, “great quantity” refers to a large or considerable amount of something. It implies a substantial or significant number or quantity.

  • For example, “They have a great quantity of books in their library.”
  • In a conversation about sales, someone might say, “They offer a great quantity of products at discounted prices.”
  • A person discussing a crowd might mention, “There was a great quantity of people at the concert.”

21. Profusion

This term refers to a large or excessive amount of something. It is often used to describe an overwhelming quantity or variety of something.

  • For example, “The garden was filled with a profusion of colorful flowers.”
  • A person might say, “The buffet offered a profusion of delicious food options.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might comment, “The museum had a profusion of stunning paintings on display.”

22. Plenty

This word is used to indicate a large or sufficient amount of something. It is a casual term that conveys the idea of having more than enough.

  • For instance, “There’s plenty of food for everyone at the party.”
  • A person might say, “I have plenty of time to finish the project.”
  • In a conversation about resources, someone might comment, “We have plenty of money to fund the project.”

23. Mountain

This slang term is used to describe a large amount or quantity of something. It is often used metaphorically to emphasize the size or magnitude of the amount.

  • For example, “I have a mountain of work to do before the deadline.”
  • A person might say, “She has a mountain of clothes in her closet.”
  • In a discussion about challenges, someone might comment, “He faced a mountain of obstacles to achieve his goals.”

24. Pile

This word is used to describe a large accumulation or quantity of something. It often implies a disorganized or haphazard arrangement of items or objects.

  • For instance, “There was a pile of dirty dishes in the sink.”
  • A person might say, “I have a pile of laundry to fold.”
  • In a conversation about paperwork, someone might comment, “I need to sort through the pile of documents on my desk.”

25. Quantity

This term refers to a specific amount or number of something. It is a more formal and general term used to describe the size or extent of a large amount.

  • For example, “We need to determine the quantity of supplies needed for the project.”
  • A person might say, “He bought a large quantity of books at the bookstore.”
  • In a discussion about data, someone might comment, “The report provides a breakdown of the quantities sold in each region.”

26. Volume

Volume refers to a significant or abundant amount of something.

  • For example, “The store had a high volume of customers during the sale.”
  • In a business context, one might say, “We need to increase our sales volume to meet our targets.”
  • A person discussing data might mention, “The report shows a volume of information that needs to be analyzed.”

27. Superabundance

Superabundance describes an excessive or surplus amount of something, often implying an overwhelming quantity.

  • For instance, “There was a superabundance of food at the buffet.”
  • A person talking about options might say, “The store had a superabundance of choices.”
  • In a discussion about resources, one might mention, “The region is known for its superabundance of natural gas.”

28. A boatload

A boatload refers to a large or overwhelming amount of something, often used in an informal or exaggerated manner.

  • For example, “We have a boatload of work to do before the deadline.”
  • In a conversation about food, someone might say, “I ate a boatload of tacos at the party.”
  • A person discussing responsibilities might mention, “I have a boatload of errands to run today.”

29. A ton

A ton refers to a significant or substantial amount of something. It is often used informally to emphasize a large quantity.

  • For instance, “I have a ton of homework to finish tonight.”
  • In a discussion about money, someone might say, “I spent a ton on new clothes.”
  • A person talking about workload might mention, “I have a ton of projects to complete this week.”

30. A heap

A heap refers to a large or extensive amount of something, often used to emphasize a considerable quantity.

  • For example, “There was a heap of presents under the Christmas tree.”
  • In a conversation about laundry, someone might say, “I have a heap of dirty clothes to wash.”
  • A person discussing problems might mention, “We encountered a heap of issues during the project.”

31. A load

“I have a load of laundry to do.” “He carried a load of groceries into the house.” “She has a load of work to finish before the deadline.”

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32. A mountain

“There’s a mountain of paperwork on my desk.” “He ate a mountain of food at the buffet.” “She has a mountain of debt to pay off.”

33. A pile

“There’s a pile of dirty dishes in the sink.” “He has a pile of clothes to fold.” “She found a pile of books in the attic.”

34. A stack

“There’s a stack of papers on the desk.” “He built a stack of books on the shelf.” “She organized a stack of files for the meeting.”

35. A bundle

“There’s a bundle of cash hidden under the mattress.” “He carried a bundle of firewood into the cabin.” “She received a bundle of letters in the mail.”

36. A wad

This phrase is often used to describe a significant amount of money. It can also refer to a bundle of cash.

  • For example, “He pulled out a wad of cash to pay for the bill.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I need to save up a wad of money for my vacation.”
  • A person might boast, “I made a wad of cash from my latest business venture.”

37. A bunch

This term is used to describe a large number or amount of something. It can refer to a collection of items or a group of people.

  • For instance, “There’s a bunch of people waiting outside the store.”
  • In a discussion about groceries, someone might say, “I bought a bunch of bananas.”
  • A person might complain, “I have a bunch of work to do before the deadline.”

38. A truckload

This phrase is used to emphasize a very large amount or quantity of something. It compares the amount to the capacity of a truck.

  • For example, “She brought a truckload of snacks to the party.”
  • In a conversation about donations, someone might say, “We received a truckload of clothes for the charity.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I have a truckload of homework to finish tonight!”

39. A plethora

This term is used to describe a large or excessive amount of something. It implies that there is an abundance or surplus.

  • For instance, “The store has a plethora of options to choose from.”
  • In a discussion about food, someone might say, “I ate a plethora of desserts at the buffet.”
  • A person might remark, “I have a plethora of clothes in my closet that I never wear.”

40. A mass

This phrase is used to describe a significant or overwhelming quantity or number of something.

  • For example, “There’s a mass of people at the concert.”
  • In a conversation about paperwork, someone might say, “I have a mass of documents to sort through.”
  • A person might comment, “There’s a mass of cars on the highway during rush hour.”

41. A slew

This phrase is used to describe a large number or quantity of something. It is often used to emphasize the abundance or overwhelming nature of the quantity.

  • For example, “There were a slew of new movies released this weekend.”
  • In a discussion about a busy day at work, someone might say, “I had a slew of meetings and deadlines to manage.”
  • A person describing their shopping spree might say, “I bought a slew of new clothes and accessories.”

42. A multitude

This term refers to a large number or variety of something. It can be used to describe a diverse range of things or a large quantity of something.

  • For instance, “The store offers a multitude of options for customers.”
  • In a conversation about a music festival, someone might say, “There was a multitude of bands performing on different stages.”
  • A person describing a crowded event might say, “There was a multitude of people at the concert.”

43. A horde

This word is used to describe a large group or crowd of people or things. It often implies a sense of chaos or disorder due to the sheer number of individuals or objects.

  • For example, “A horde of fans gathered outside the stadium before the game.”
  • In a discussion about a busy shopping mall, someone might say, “There was a horde of shoppers during the holiday season.”
  • A person describing a swarm of insects might say, “There was a horde of mosquitoes at the campsite.”

44. A swarm

This term refers to a large number of things, usually in motion or moving together. It can be used to describe a group of animals, insects, or even people.

  • For instance, “A swarm of bees descended upon the picnic.”
  • In a conversation about a crowded street, someone might say, “There was a swarm of pedestrians during rush hour.”
  • A person describing a group of protesters might say, “There was a swarm of activists marching through the city.”

45. A flock

This word is used to describe a large group of birds or people. It is often used in reference to birds flying together or a group of people gathering in one place.

  • For example, “A flock of seagulls flew overhead at the beach.”
  • In a discussion about a music concert, someone might say, “There was a flock of fans waiting in line for tickets.”
  • A person describing a group of tourists might say, “There was a flock of visitors at the popular tourist attraction.”

46. A crowd

This term refers to a large gathering of individuals in one place. It is often used to describe a large number of people in a specific location or event.

  • For example, “There was a huge crowd at the concert last night.”
  • During a protest, someone might say, “The crowd marched through the streets demanding change.”
  • At a sporting event, a commentator might say, “The home team’s win brought the crowd to their feet.”

47. Ton

This term is used to describe a significant or substantial amount of something. It can refer to either a literal weight measurement or a figurative representation of a large number or quantity.

  • For instance, “I have a ton of work to do before the deadline.”
  • When talking about food, someone might say, “I ate a ton of pizza at the party.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might exclaim, “I spent a ton of money on that vacation!”

48. Load

This term is used to describe a substantial amount of something. It can refer to a physical load or burden, as well as a figurative representation of a large quantity.

  • For example, “I have a load of laundry to do today.”
  • When discussing a busy schedule, someone might say, “I have a load of meetings this week.”
  • In a conversation about responsibilities, a person might complain, “I have a load of work to finish before the end of the day.”

49. Heap

This term refers to a large amount or quantity of something. It can be used to describe a physical heap or pile, as well as a figurative representation of a significant number or amount.

  • For instance, “There was a heap of clothes on the floor.”
  • When talking about problems or challenges, someone might say, “I have a heap of issues to deal with.”
  • In a discussion about accomplishments, a person might say, “I received a heap of praise for my performance.”

50. Megaton

This term is used to describe an immense or colossal amount of something. It is often used in a hyperbolic or exaggerated manner to emphasize the magnitude or size.

  • For example, “The explosion created a megaton of debris.”
  • When discussing a successful event, someone might say, “We had a megaton of attendees.”
  • In a conversation about data storage, a person might say, “My computer has a megaton of storage space.”

51. Abundance

An abundance refers to a plentiful or copious amount of something. It is often used to describe an overwhelming or excessive quantity.

  • For example, “The garden was filled with an abundance of beautiful flowers.”
  • A person might say, “I have an abundance of work to do before the deadline.”
  • In a discussion about food, someone might mention, “The buffet offered an abundance of delicious options.”

52. Deluge

A deluge refers to a sudden and overwhelming amount of something, often used metaphorically to describe a flood or torrential downpour.

  • For instance, “After the announcement, there was a deluge of messages and inquiries.”
  • A person might say, “The company received a deluge of orders after the product launch.”
  • In a discussion about news, someone might comment, “The headlines were filled with a deluge of shocking stories.”

53. Overflow

Overflow refers to exceeding the capacity or limits of something, often used to describe a large amount that cannot be contained.

  • For example, “The river overflowed its banks after heavy rain.”
  • A person might say, “The stadium was filled to overflow with excited fans.”
  • In a discussion about data, someone might mention, “The storage capacity of the device is not sufficient, causing an overflow of files.”

54. Plenitude

Plenitude refers to a fullness or abundance of something, often used to describe a large or plentiful amount.

  • For instance, “The market was filled with a plenitude of fresh fruits and vegetables.”
  • A person might say, “The book offers a plenitude of information on the topic.”
  • In a discussion about opportunities, someone might comment, “In this field, there is a plenitude of potential career paths.”

55. Surfeit

Surfeit refers to an excessive or excessive amount of something, often used to describe an oversupply or surplus.

  • For example, “After the feast, there was a surfeit of leftovers.”
  • A person might say, “The market was flooded with a surfeit of cheap imitations.”
  • In a discussion about consumerism, someone might mention, “The culture of excess has led to a surfeit of material possessions.”

56. Surplus

Surplus refers to an extra or excess amount of something. It implies that there is more than what is needed or required.

  • For example, “We have a surplus of food after the event, so we can donate it to a local shelter.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “There is a surplus of office supplies, so feel free to take what you need.”
  • A person discussing finances might mention, “Having a surplus of income allows for more savings and investments.”

57. Excess

Excess refers to having more than what is necessary or desired. It implies an abundance or an amount that exceeds the expected or required quantity.

  • For instance, “She spent an excess amount of money on clothes during the sale.”
  • In a health context, someone might say, “Consuming excess sugar can lead to various health problems.”
  • A person discussing workload might mention, “Working excessive hours without breaks can lead to burnout.”

58. Cluster

Cluster refers to a group or collection of things or people that are closely grouped together. It implies a concentration or a gathering of similar items or individuals.

  • For example, “There is a cluster of stars in the night sky.”
  • In a biology context, someone might say, “The cells formed a cluster under the microscope.”
  • A person discussing data might mention, “There is a cluster of data points that indicate a specific pattern.”

59. Horde

Horde refers to a large group or crowd of people or things. It implies a mass or multitude of individuals or objects.

  • For instance, “A horde of fans gathered outside the stadium to catch a glimpse of their favorite celebrity.”
  • In a fantasy context, someone might say, “The hero faced a horde of monsters in the final battle.”
  • A person discussing traffic might mention, “During rush hour, there is a horde of cars on the highway.”

60. Multitude

Multitude refers to a great number or multitude of things or people. It implies a large quantity or a vast amount.

  • For example, “There is a multitude of options to choose from at the buffet.”
  • In a social context, someone might say, “The concert attracted a multitude of fans from all over the country.”
  • A person discussing opinions might mention, “There is a multitude of perspectives on this topic.”

61. Swarm

This term is often used to describe a large amount or group of people or things. It can also imply a sense of chaos or disorder.

  • For example, “There was a swarm of protesters outside the courthouse.”
  • In a discussion about insects, one might say, “I saw a swarm of bees in my backyard.”
  • Someone might use this term to describe a crowded event, saying, “The concert was packed, there was a swarm of people everywhere.”

62. Zillion

This word is used to emphasize a large, often exaggerated, number. It is often used in a playful or informal context.

  • For instance, “I’ve told you a zillion times to clean your room.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “He must be making a zillion dollars with that business.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a long wait, saying, “I’ve been waiting for the bus for a zillion years.”