Top 25 Slang For Left – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing direction, “left” may seem straightforward, but the world of slang adds a whole new twist to it. From quirky phrases to trendy abbreviations, navigating the slang for “left” can be a fun and enlightening experience. Let’s unravel this linguistic mystery together and uncover the coolest ways to talk about going “left” in style!

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1. Southpaw

Southpaw is a term used to describe a person who is left-handed. It originated from the sport of boxing, where left-handed fighters would often have their right hand, or “strong hand,” positioned towards the south side of the ring.

  • For example, “My brother is a talented southpaw pitcher.”
  • In a conversation about sports, someone might say, “Many great baseball players are southpaws.”
  • A left-handed person might proudly identify themselves as a southpaw, saying, “I’ve always been a southpaw, even when I write.”

2. Port

In nautical terms, the port refers to the left side of a ship when facing forward. This term is used to distinguish the left side from the right side, known as starboard.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “The cargo is loaded on the port side of the ship.”
  • In a maritime discussion, someone might ask, “Which side of the boat is the port side?”
  • A captain might give instructions, saying, “Turn the ship to port to avoid the incoming storm.”

3. Sinister

Sinister is a term often used to describe something that is evil, threatening, or associated with the left side. It has its roots in Latin, where “sinister” means “left.”

  • For example, a character in a horror movie might have a sinister smile.
  • In a spooky story, someone might say, “I felt a sinister presence in the room.”
  • A person describing a suspicious situation might say, “There was something sinister about the way he looked at me.”

4. Larboard

Larboard is an old nautical term that refers to the left side of a ship, similar to the term port. However, it is less commonly used today and has been replaced by the term port to avoid confusion with the word starboard.

  • For instance, a sailor might say, “The larboard side of the ship is damaged.”
  • In a historical discussion about sailing, someone might ask, “What was the larboard side used for?”
  • A maritime enthusiast might use the term larboard when discussing traditional sailing techniques.

5. Lefty

Lefty is a casual term used to refer to a person who is left-handed. It is a shortened form of “leftie” or “left-handed.”

  • For example, a friend might say, “I didn’t know you were a lefty!”
  • In a conversation about handwriting, someone might ask, “Are you a lefty or a righty?”
  • A left-handed person might joke, “Lefties are the only ones in their right minds!”

6. Portside

Portside refers to the left side of a ship when facing forward. The term is used to indicate direction or location on a ship.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “The cargo is stored on the portside of the ship.”
  • During a naval battle, a captain might command, “Turn the ship to portside to avoid the enemy’s attack.”
  • A passenger on a cruise ship might ask, “Which side of the ship can I see the sunset? Is it on the portside?”

7. South Paw

South Paw is a term used to describe a person who is left-handed. It is often used in sports to refer to left-handed athletes.

  • For instance, in baseball, a commentator might say, “He’s a talented south paw pitcher.”
  • In boxing, a trainer might say, “Watch out for his left hook, he’s a south paw.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Are you a south paw? We have left-handed scissors available.”

8. Cack-handed

Cack-handed is a slang term used to describe someone who is clumsy or awkward with their left hand. It is often used humorously or playfully.

  • For example, a friend might jokingly say, “You’re so cack-handed, you can’t even hold a pen properly.”
  • A person struggling to use their left hand might say, “I feel so cack-handed trying to write with my non-dominant hand.”
  • In a group of friends, someone might tease, “Don’t let him handle the tools, he’s cack-handed!”

9. Northpaw

Northpaw is a term used to describe a person who is right-handed. It is the opposite of south paw and is less commonly used.

  • For instance, a coach might say, “Our team has a mix of south paws and northpaws.”
  • In a conversation about hand dominance, someone might ask, “Are you a south paw or a northpaw?”
  • A parent might notice their child’s hand preference and say, “Looks like she’s a northpaw like her dad.”

10. Left Bank

Left Bank refers to the southern bank of a river when facing downstream. It is often used in reference to geographical locations.

  • For example, in Paris, the Left Bank of the Seine River is known for its artistic and intellectual culture.
  • A travel guide might recommend, “Take a stroll along the Left Bank of the river for charming cafes and bookstores.”
  • In a conversation about city planning, someone might say, “The park should be located on the Left Bank to provide a beautiful view of the river.”

11. Left-hand side

This term refers to the side that is to the left when facing a particular object or direction. It is commonly used to give directions or indicate a specific location on the left side.

  • For example, a person might say, “The store is on the left-hand side of the street.”
  • When giving driving directions, someone might say, “Take a left-hand turn at the intersection and you’ll see the park on the LHS.”
  • In a classroom, a teacher might say, “Please sit on the left-hand side of the room.”

12. Left-hand turn

This term is used to describe a turn made by a vehicle or person in which they change their direction to the left. It is commonly used in driving and navigation.

  • For instance, a driving instructor might say, “Signal your intention to make a left-hand turn.”
  • When giving directions, someone might say, “Take a left-hand turn at the next intersection.”
  • In a conversation about driving safety, a person might mention, “Always check for pedestrians before making a left-hand turn.”

13. Leftward

This term describes movement or direction towards the left. It is often used to indicate a shift or change in position towards the left side.

  • For example, a person might say, “The car veered leftward to avoid the obstacle.”
  • When giving instructions, someone might say, “Move leftward until you reach the end of the hallway.”
  • In a discussion about political ideologies, someone might say, “The party has shifted leftward in recent years.”

14. Leftwards

This term is similar to “leftward” and describes movement or direction towards the left. It is often used interchangeably with “leftward” to indicate a shift or change in position towards the left side.

  • For instance, a person might say, “The arrow points leftwards to indicate the exit.”
  • When giving directions, someone might say, “Continue walking leftwards until you reach the building.”
  • In a conversation about visual design, a person might say, “The logo has a leftwards slant to create a sense of movement.”

15. Leftmost

This term is used to describe the position or location that is the farthest to the left among a group or set of objects. It is often used to indicate the extreme left side.

  • For example, a person might say, “The leftmost lane is reserved for high-occupancy vehicles.”
  • When discussing a list of items, someone might say, “The leftmost column contains the primary data.”
  • In a conversation about seating arrangements, a person might say, “Please take the leftmost seat in the front row.”

16. Leftover

This term refers to something that remains or is left behind after the main portion has been used or taken. It can also be used to describe a small amount of food that is left uneaten after a meal.

  • For example, “I have some leftover pizza from last night.”
  • A person might say, “I always make sure to save my leftovers for lunch the next day.”
  • In a recipe discussion, someone might ask, “What are some creative ways to use up leftover chicken?”

17. Leftwardly

This term describes a movement or direction that is towards the left side.

  • For instance, “She turned leftwardly and walked down the street.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer to drive leftwardly on this road because it’s easier to find parking.”
  • In a political discussion, someone might argue, “We need to shift our policies leftwardly to address social inequality.”

18. Leftwardsly

Similar to “leftwardly,” this term describes a movement or direction that is towards the left side.

  • For example, “He gestured leftwardsly to indicate the correct path.”
  • A person might say, “I always navigate leftwardsly when I’m in an unfamiliar place.”
  • In a sports discussion, someone might comment, “The player made a quick leftwardsly dodge to avoid the defender.”

19. Leftward movement

This term refers to the act or process of moving towards the left side.

  • For instance, “The leftward movement of the political party gained momentum.”
  • A person might say, “I noticed a leftward movement in the stock market today.”
  • In a dance class, someone might instruct, “Now, let’s practice the leftward movement in this choreography.”

20. Leftwards movement

Similar to “leftward movement,” this term refers to the act or process of moving towards the left side.

  • For example, “The leftwards movement of the crowd created a path for the parade.”
  • A person might say, “I observed a leftwards movement in the traffic flow.”
  • In a military training, someone might explain, “The soldiers need to coordinate their leftwards movement during the tactical maneuver.”

21. Lefty-loo

This term is used to refer to someone who is left-handed. It is a playful and lighthearted way to describe a person who favors their left hand for writing and other tasks.

  • For example, “My best friend is a lefty-loo and always smudges his writing.”
  • A teacher might say, “We have a few lefty-loos in the class, so make sure to accommodate their needs.”
  • A parent might proudly exclaim, “My child is a lefty-loo just like their grandparent!”

22. Left-hand thread

This refers to a type of screw or bolt that has threads that turn counterclockwise, opposite to the standard right-hand threads. Left-hand threads are less common and are often used in specialized applications.

  • For instance, a mechanic might say, “Be careful when removing that bolt, it has a left-hand thread.”
  • A DIY enthusiast might ask, “Does anyone know where I can find left-hand threaded screws?”
  • A machinist might explain, “Left-hand threads are used in certain situations to prevent loosening due to rotation.”

23. Offside

In sports, particularly in soccer or hockey, “offside” refers to a player being in a position that is against the rules. It means that the player is closer to the opponent’s goal line than both the ball and the second-to-last defender when the ball is played.

  • For example, a referee might blow the whistle and call “offside” when a player receives a pass while in an offside position.
  • A fan might argue, “The goal should have been disallowed because the scorer was offside.”
  • A coach might instruct their team, “Make sure to stay onside and time your runs properly.”

24. Nearside

This term refers to the left side of a vehicle or any other object. It is commonly used in the context of driving, where the nearside is the side closest to the curb or the left side of the car.

  • For instance, a driving instructor might say, “Check your nearside mirror before making a left turn.”
  • A car enthusiast might comment, “The nearside of this vintage vehicle is beautifully restored.”
  • A mechanic might explain, “The nearside brake pads are worn out and need to be replaced.”

25. Left Field

This slang term is often used to describe something that is strange, out of the ordinary, or unexpected. It originates from baseball, where the left field is typically less active and less commonly hit to compared to the other fields.

  • For example, “That idea came out of left field, but it might just work.”
  • A friend might say, “You always come up with the most left field suggestions.”
  • A journalist might write, “The politician’s statement was completely out of left field and caught everyone by surprise.”
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