Top 42 Slang For Lessen – Meaning & Usage

“Slang For Lessen” might sound like a foreign language to some, but fear not! We’ve got you covered with a curated list of the trendiest and most used slang words and phrases that’ll help you navigate through everyday conversations with ease. From casual chats to social media captions, we’ve got the inside scoop on all the latest lingo that’ll make you feel like a language pro in no time. So, buckle up and get ready to level up your slang game with our comprehensive guide!

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1. Ease up

To ease up means to relax or reduce the intensity of something. It is often used to describe the act of lessening pressure or stress.

  • For example, a boss might say to an employee, “Ease up on the deadlines, we don’t need to rush.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might tell their team, “Ease up on the aggressive plays, we need to focus on defense.”
  • A friend might advise another, “You should ease up on your strict diet and allow yourself some treats once in a while.”

2. Scale back

To scale back means to reduce or decrease the size, extent, or intensity of something. It is often used when referring to cutting back on certain activities or resources.

  • For instance, a company might decide to scale back its operations due to financial difficulties.
  • A person might say, “I need to scale back on my social commitments, I’m feeling overwhelmed.”
  • During a conversation about budgeting, someone might suggest, “Maybe we should scale back on dining out to save money.”

3. Cut down

To cut down means to reduce or decrease the amount of something. It is often used when referring to lessening a specific behavior or consumption.

  • For example, a doctor might advise a patient to cut down on their sugar intake to improve their health.
  • A person might say, “I need to cut down on my screen time, it’s affecting my productivity.”
  • During a discussion about environmental conservation, someone might suggest, “Let’s all cut down on single-use plastics to reduce waste.”

4. Dial down

To dial down means to decrease or lessen the intensity or level of something. It is often used to describe the act of reducing a particular aspect or quality.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Can you please dial down the volume on the TV? It’s too loud.”
  • During a heated argument, someone might suggest, “Let’s all dial down the hostility and try to have a calm discussion.”
  • In a cooking context, a chef might instruct their sous chef, “Dial down the spices in this dish, it’s too overpowering.”

5. Take the edge off

To take the edge off means to lessen or reduce the intensity or severity of something. It is often used to describe the act of making a situation or feeling more bearable.

  • For example, a person might say, “A cup of tea always helps take the edge off a stressful day.”
  • During a conversation about pain management, someone might suggest, “Try taking some ibuprofen to take the edge off your headache.”
  • A friend might advise another, “Let’s grab a drink after work to take the edge off and relax.”

6. Taper off

To gradually decrease or reduce something over time. This slang is often used to describe the process of reducing the intensity or frequency of an activity or behavior.

  • For example, “I’m going to taper off my caffeine intake to avoid withdrawal symptoms.”
  • A person might say, “As the semester comes to an end, the workload starts to taper off.”
  • In a conversation about exercise, someone might mention, “I’m going to taper off my running to give my body a break.”

7. Wind down

To relax or calm down after a period of activity or excitement. This slang is often used to describe the process of winding down at the end of the day or after a busy period.

  • For instance, “After a long day at work, I like to wind down with a hot bath.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s wind down with a movie and some popcorn.”
  • In a discussion about stress relief, someone might mention, “Taking deep breaths can help you wind down and relax.”

8. Let up

To ease or decrease in intensity or severity. This slang is often used to describe the process of a situation becoming less intense or a behavior becoming less extreme.

  • For example, “The rain finally let up after hours of heavy downpour.”
  • A person might say, “I hope the traffic lets up soon so I can get home.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult task, someone might mention, “Don’t let up on your efforts; the end is in sight.”

9. Back off

To step back or retreat from a situation or confrontation. This slang is often used to describe the process of reducing one’s involvement or aggression.

  • For instance, “I had to tell him to back off and give me some space.”
  • A person might say, “Back off before you say something you’ll regret.”
  • In a discussion about assertiveness, someone might mention, “Knowing when to back off is an important skill.”

10. Tone down

To make something less intense, extreme, or exaggerated. This slang is often used to describe the process of reducing the impact or intensity of something.

  • For example, “The director asked the actors to tone down their performances.”
  • A person might say, “You should tone down your criticism; it’s not helpful.”
  • In a conversation about decorating, someone might mention, “I think we should tone down the colors and go for a more neutral palette.”

11. Water down

This slang term means to make something weaker or less potent by adding water or reducing its intensity. It can also refer to making something less impactful or significant.

  • For example, “The company watered down their product to appeal to a wider audience.”
  • In a political context, one might say, “The politician’s statement was watered down to avoid controversy.”
  • A person discussing a movie might comment, “The sequel was disappointing because they watered down the original concept.”

12. Pare down

To pare down means to reduce or simplify something by removing unnecessary elements or making it more concise.

  • For instance, “I need to pare down my wardrobe and get rid of clothes I don’t wear.”
  • In a discussion about productivity, someone might say, “I’m trying to pare down my to-do list and focus on the most important tasks.”
  • A person organizing their belongings might comment, “I’m paring down my book collection to make more space.”

13. Shave off

To shave off means to reduce or remove a small amount of something, usually to make it smaller or more manageable.

  • For example, “I need to shave off a few minutes from my presentation to fit within the time limit.”
  • In a fitness context, someone might say, “I’ve been working hard to shave off a few pounds before my vacation.”
  • A person discussing budgeting might comment, “I’m trying to shave off some unnecessary expenses to save more money.”

14. Trim back

To trim back means to reduce or cut down on something, often to make it more efficient or manageable.

  • For instance, “I need to trim back on my social media usage to increase my productivity.”
  • In a gardening context, someone might say, “I’m trimming back the overgrown bushes to make the garden look neater.”
  • A person discussing their schedule might comment, “I’m trying to trim back on commitments to create more free time.”

15. Slack off

To slack off means to decrease or reduce one’s effort or productivity, often by relaxing or being less diligent.

  • For example, “I can’t afford to slack off at work if I want to meet my deadlines.”
  • In a school setting, a teacher might warn students, “Don’t slack off on your studying or you’ll struggle on the exam.”
  • A person discussing motivation might comment, “It’s easy to slack off when you don’t have clear goals or deadlines.”

16. Loosen up

To loosen up means to relax or become less tense. It is often used to encourage someone to be less serious or more easygoing.

  • For example, if someone is being too serious at a party, you might say, “Come on, loosen up and have some fun!”
  • In a stressful situation, someone might tell you, “Take a deep breath and try to loosen up.”
  • When someone is being overly cautious, you could say, “You need to loosen up a bit and take some risks.”

17. Lighten up

To lighten up means to become less serious or intense. It is often used to encourage someone to have a more positive or relaxed attitude.

  • For instance, if someone is being overly sensitive, you might say, “Hey, lighten up! It was just a joke.”
  • In a tense situation, someone might say, “We need to lighten up and find some humor in this.”
  • When someone is taking things too seriously, you could say, “You need to lighten up and enjoy life a little more.”

18. Soften up

To soften up means to become less strict or severe. It is often used to encourage someone to be more lenient or understanding.

  • For example, if a teacher is being too strict, a student might say, “Can you soften up a bit and give us a break?”
  • In a negotiation, someone might say, “We need to soften up our demands to reach a compromise.”
  • When someone is being harsh or unforgiving, you could say, “You should soften up and give them a second chance.”

19. Minimize

To minimize means to reduce or make smaller. It is often used to describe the action of making something less significant or important.

  • For instance, if a problem arises, you might say, “We need to minimize the impact and find a solution.”
  • In a presentation, someone might say, “Let’s minimize the amount of text on the slides and focus on visuals.”
  • When someone is exaggerating, you could say, “You’re blowing it out of proportion. Minimize the drama.”

20. Diminish

To diminish means to make or become less. It is often used to describe the action of reducing the intensity, size, or importance of something.

  • For example, if a person’s influence is decreasing, you might say, “Their power is starting to diminish.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “The importance of this issue should not be diminished.”
  • When someone’s confidence is wavering, you could say, “Don’t let criticism diminish your self-belief.”

21. Subside

To become less intense, severe, or active. “Subside” is often used to describe a decrease in the intensity of something, such as pain, emotions, or a natural phenomenon.

  • For instance, after a storm, someone might say, “The rain has subsided and the sun is starting to come out.”
  • If someone is feeling angry, they might say, “I need some time to let my anger subside before I can have a rational conversation.”
  • A person experiencing physical pain might say, “I took some pain medication and now the pain is starting to subside.”

22. Mitigate

To reduce the severity, seriousness, or negative effects of something. “Mitigate” is often used in the context of minimizing risks, damage, or harm.

  • For example, in a business setting, a manager might say, “We need to implement measures to mitigate the risks of a potential data breach.”
  • In environmental discussions, someone might say, “Planting trees can help mitigate the effects of climate change.”
  • A doctor might advise a patient, “Taking this medication will help mitigate the symptoms of your condition.”

23. Alleviate

To make something less severe, intense, or burdensome. “Alleviate” is often used to describe the act of providing relief or making something more bearable.

  • For instance, if someone is feeling stressed, they might say, “I need to do something to alleviate this stress.”
  • In a medical context, a doctor might say, “Taking this medication will alleviate your pain.”
  • A person experiencing financial difficulties might say, “Finding a part-time job will help alleviate some of my financial stress.”

24. Trim down

To reduce the size, amount, or quantity of something. “Trim down” is often used to describe the act of making something leaner or more streamlined.

  • For example, if someone wants to lose weight, they might say, “I need to trim down my portion sizes and eat healthier.”
  • In a budgeting context, someone might say, “I need to trim down my expenses to save more money.”
  • A person organizing their belongings might say, “I’m going to trim down my wardrobe and donate clothes I no longer wear.”

25. Step down

To voluntarily relinquish a position or role of authority. “Step down” is often used in the context of someone voluntarily giving up a position or responsibility.

  • For instance, if a company’s CEO decides to retire, they might announce, “I have decided to step down as CEO.”
  • In politics, a leader might say, “After serving two terms, it’s time for me to step down and let someone else take the reins.”
  • A team captain might announce, “I’ve decided to step down as captain and pass the role to someone else.”

26. Drop off

To decrease or reduce something.

  • For example, “I need to drop off my workload before I can relax.”
  • A teacher might say, “The students’ attention tends to drop off after lunch.”
  • A coach might instruct their team, “We need to drop off the intensity in our training to avoid burnout.”

27. Cut back

To reduce the amount or frequency of something.

  • For instance, “I need to cut back on my spending to save money.”
  • A doctor might advise a patient, “You should cut back on your sugar intake to improve your health.”
  • A manager might say, “We need to cut back on meetings to increase productivity.”

28. Let off

To decrease or lessen the intensity or severity of something.

  • For example, “The boss let me off the hook for being late.”
  • A parent might say to a child, “I’ll let you off this time, but don’t do it again.”
  • A teacher might let off a student for a minor offense without punishment.
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29. Dampen

To make something less intense or strong.

  • For instance, “The rain dampened our plans for a picnic.”
  • A disappointing news might dampen someone’s mood.
  • A speaker might dampen the excitement of the audience by delivering a boring presentation.

30. Quell

To put an end to something or reduce its intensity.

  • For example, “The police quelled the protest before it turned violent.”
  • A leader might quell rumors by addressing them directly.
  • A teacher might quell disruptive behavior in the classroom by implementing strict rules.

31. Relieve

This term means to alleviate or lessen something, often in the context of reducing stress or discomfort. It can also refer to making a situation easier or more manageable.

  • For example, “I took a hot bath to relieve my sore muscles.”
  • Someone might say, “Listening to music helps me relieve stress after a long day.”
  • A person discussing work might say, “Hiring an assistant has relieved some of my workload.”

32. Moderate

To moderate something means to make it less extreme or intense. It can also refer to exercising self-control or finding a middle ground.

  • For instance, “She moderated her tone of voice to avoid sounding confrontational.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might argue, “We need to find a candidate who can appeal to both liberals and conservatives and take a moderate stance.”
  • A person discussing diet might say, “I try to moderate my intake of sugary foods.”

33. Reduce

To reduce something means to make it smaller, decrease its quantity, or diminish its intensity. It can refer to various aspects such as size, amount, or impact.

  • For example, “I’m trying to reduce my carbon footprint by using public transportation.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “We need to reduce our spending in order to save more money.”
  • A person discussing weight loss might say, “I’m trying to reduce my portion sizes to shed some pounds.”

34. Scale down

To scale down means to decrease the size, extent, or importance of something. It often refers to making something smaller or more manageable.

  • For instance, “The company had to scale down its operations due to financial difficulties.”
  • In a discussion about renovations, someone might say, “We decided to scale down our plans and focus on a smaller project.”
  • A person discussing a project might say, “We need to scale down our ambitions and set more realistic goals.”

35. Trim

To trim means to remove excess or unnecessary parts of something, usually in order to make it more efficient or reduce its size.

  • For example, “I trimmed the bushes in my backyard to make them look neater.”
  • In a conversation about editing a document, someone might say, “We need to trim down the content to make it more concise.”
  • A person discussing budgeting might say, “I trimmed my expenses by canceling unnecessary subscriptions.”

36. Dwindle

To gradually become smaller, weaker, or less in quantity or intensity.

  • For example, “The number of attendees dwindled as the event went on.”
  • In a discussion about a failing business, someone might say, “The company’s profits have been dwindling for months.”
  • A person describing their energy levels might say, “My motivation tends to dwindle by the end of the day.”

37. Shrink

To become smaller in size, amount, or value.

  • For instance, “The budget for the project shrank after unexpected expenses.”
  • In a conversation about weight loss, someone might say, “I need to shrink my waistline before summer.”
  • A person discussing the economy might say, “When consumer spending shrinks, it can lead to a recession.”

38. Ease off

To become less intense, severe, or strict.

  • For example, “The rain finally eased off after a heavy storm.”
  • In a discussion about work expectations, someone might say, “I hope my boss eases off on the deadlines.”
  • A person describing their stress levels might say, “I need the weekend to ease off and relax.”

39. Taper

To gradually decrease in intensity, volume, or amount.

  • For instance, “The music slowly tapered off at the end of the song.”
  • In a conversation about training for a race, someone might say, “I’m going to taper my running mileage leading up to the event.”
  • A person discussing medication might say, “It’s important to taper off certain medications to avoid withdrawal symptoms.”

40. Slacken

To become less tight, firm, or strict.

  • For example, “The rope slackened as he released his grip.”
  • In a discussion about a company’s policies, someone might say, “Management needs to slacken the dress code.”
  • A person describing their productivity might say, “My focus tends to slacken in the afternoon.”

41. Soften

To make something less intense or severe. When you soften something, you reduce its impact or make it less harsh.

  • For example, “She tried to soften the blow by delivering the bad news gently.”
  • In a negotiation, one might say, “Let’s soften our demands to reach a compromise.”
  • When giving feedback, a manager might suggest, “Softening your tone could make your message more constructive.”

42. Subdue

To bring something under control or make it less intense. When you subdue something, you suppress or restrain it.

  • For instance, “The police used force to subdue the rioters.”
  • In a conflict, one might say, “We need to find a way to subdue our anger and have a productive conversation.”
  • When dealing with a difficult customer, a salesperson might try to subdue their frustration by offering a solution.
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