Top 66 Slang For Let’S Go – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing excitement and readiness to embark on a new adventure, there are countless ways to say “let’s go!” But which slang terms are the most popular? Well, look no further because we’ve got you covered. In this article, we’ve gathered the top slang expressions for “let’s go” that will have you pumped up and ready to take on anything! So buckle up and get ready to add some fresh phrases to your vocabulary.

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1. GTG

This acronym is used to express the need to leave or end a conversation quickly. It is often used in text messages or online chats.

  • For example, “Sorry, GTG. Talk to you later!”
  • A person might say, “I have a meeting in 5 minutes, GTG.”
  • In a group chat, someone might announce, “GTG, have a great day everyone!”

2. LFG

This phrase is commonly used in online gaming to indicate that a player is searching for a group or team to join for a specific activity or game.

  • For instance, “LFG for a raid, need 2 more players.”
  • A player might say, “Anyone LFG for PvP matches?”
  • In a gaming forum, someone might post, “LFG for a competitive team, DM me if interested!”

3. G2G

Similar to GTG, this acronym is used to express the need to leave or end a conversation quickly. It is often used in text messages or online chats.

  • For example, “I have to catch my bus, G2G!”
  • A person might say, “G2G, dinner’s ready.”
  • In a group chat, someone might announce, “G2G, see you all tomorrow!”

4. CYA

This acronym is used to say goodbye or indicate that you will see someone again in the future. It is commonly used in informal conversations.

  • For instance, “I’m heading out, CYA!”
  • A person might say, “CYA next week at the party.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “Gotta go, CYA soon!”

5. CUL8R

This abbreviation is a playful way of saying “See you later.” It is often used in casual conversations, especially in text messages or online chats.

  • For example, “I’m off to class, CUL8R!”
  • A person might say, “CUL8R, have a great day.”
  • In a group chat, someone might write, “CUL8R, enjoy your weekend!”

6. BAI

A shortened version of “goodbye,” used to bid farewell to someone.

  • For example, “I have to go now, bai!”
  • When leaving a chatroom, a user might say, “Nice talking to you all, bai!”
  • A person might send a text saying, “Leaving work now, bai!”

7. TTYL

An abbreviation used to indicate that the speaker will talk to the listener at a later time.

  • For instance, “I have to go to a meeting now, ttyl!”
  • When ending a phone call, a person might say, “I’ll catch up with you later, ttyl!”
  • A text message might read, “I’m busy right now, but I’ll text you later, ttyl!”

8. TTFN

A playful way of saying goodbye, indicating that the speaker will see the listener later.

  • For example, “I’m off to the movies, ttfm!”
  • When leaving a gathering, a person might say, “Thanks for having me over, ttfn!”
  • A text message might read, “I’m heading out for dinner, ttfn!”

9. BRB

Used to indicate that the speaker will be away for a short period of time and will return soon.

  • For instance, “I need to grab a drink, brb!”
  • When stepping away from the computer, a person might say, “I’ll be right back, brb!”
  • A text message might read, “Gotta take the dog out, brb!”

10. AFK

An abbreviation used to indicate that the speaker will be away from their computer or device for a period of time.

  • For example, “I’m going to get some food, afk!”
  • When taking a break from gaming, a person might say, “I’ll be afk for a few minutes.”
  • A text message might read, “I’m stepping away from my desk, afk!”

11. IDK

This is an abbreviation for “I don’t know.” It is commonly used in casual conversations or text messages when someone is unsure about something.

  • For example, if someone asks, “What time is the party?” a person might reply, “IDK, I haven’t heard anything about it.”
  • In a group chat, someone might say, “IDK about going to the concert, it depends on my schedule.”
  • A person might use IDK as a response to a difficult question, saying, “Sorry, IDK the answer to that.”

12. NVM

NVM is short for “never mind.” It is used to dismiss or retract something that was previously said or asked, indicating that it is no longer important or relevant.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Did you finish your homework?” and the person realizes they actually didn’t, they might say, “NVM, I still have to do it.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “NVM, I found the answer myself.”
  • A person might use NVM to correct a mistake, saying, “I said the wrong thing, NVM what I just said.”

13. OMG

OMG is an abbreviation for “Oh my God.” It is often used to express surprise, excitement, or disbelief.

  • For example, if someone sees a cute puppy, they might say, “OMG, it’s so adorable!”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “OMG, I can’t believe I won the lottery!”
  • A person might use OMG to express shock, saying, “OMG, I just found out my favorite band is coming to town!”

14. LOL

LOL is an abbreviation for “laugh out loud.” It is used to indicate that something is funny or amusing.

  • For instance, if someone tells a joke, someone might respond with “LOL, that’s hilarious!”
  • In an online conversation, someone might write, “LOL, I can’t believe that just happened.”
  • A person might use LOL to lighten the mood, saying, “LOL, thanks for making me laugh.”

15. OMW

OMW is an abbreviation for “on my way.” It is used to indicate that someone is currently traveling or heading to a specific location.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you coming to the party?” a person might reply, “OMW, be there soon!”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “OMW, just got in the car.”
  • A person might use OMW to let someone know they are en route, saying, “OMW, should be there in 10 minutes.”

16. WYD

This is a shorthand way to ask someone what they are currently doing or what their plans are.

  • For instance, you might text a friend, “WYD tonight?”
  • In a group chat, someone might ask, “WYD this weekend?”
  • If you see a friend online, you could message them, “Hey, WYD right now?”

17. HBU

This is a phrase used to inquire about the other person’s thoughts, feelings, or plans after sharing your own.

  • For example, if you say, “I’m going to the beach. HBU?”
  • In a conversation about favorite movies, you might say, “Mine is ‘The Shawshank Redemption.’ HBU?”
  • If you’re discussing weekend plans, you could ask, “I’m thinking of going hiking. HBU?”

18. LMK

This is a way to express that you want the other person to inform you or provide you with information.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you’re available for a meeting, you might respond, “LMK the time and place.”
  • If a friend suggests grabbing dinner together, you could say, “Sure, LMK where you want to go.”
  • In a group chat about a party, you might say, “I can bring drinks. LMK what else is needed.”

19. HMU

This is an invitation for someone to contact you or reach out to you, often for socializing or making plans.

  • For example, if you want to hang out with a friend, you might say, “HMU this weekend.”
  • If you’re looking for recommendations for a restaurant, you could post on social media, “New to the area, HMU with your favorite spots.”
  • In a conversation about a job opening, you might say, “I heard there’s an opening at your company. HMU with the details.”

20. YOLO

This phrase is used to encourage someone to take risks or live life to the fullest, as life is short and should be enjoyed.

  • For instance, if someone suggests going skydiving, you might respond, “Sure, YOLO!”
  • In a conversation about travel, you could say, “I’m thinking of booking a spontaneous trip. YOLO, right?”
  • If someone hesitates to try a new activity, you might say, “Come on, YOLO! Give it a shot!”

21. BFF

This acronym is used to refer to close friends who are like family. It emphasizes the strong bond and loyalty between friends.

  • For example, “I’m going out with my BFF tonight.”
  • A person might post a picture with their best friend and caption it, “Me and my BFF, partners in crime.”
  • When talking about a lifelong friend, one might say, “We’ve been BFFs since kindergarten.”

22. FOMO

This term describes the feeling of anxiety or unease that arises when one feels they are missing out on exciting or interesting experiences happening elsewhere.

  • For instance, “I didn’t go to the party and now I have serious FOMO.”
  • A person might mention, “I always end up scrolling through social media to avoid FOMO.”
  • When discussing weekend plans, someone might say, “I want to go to the concert to avoid FOMO.”

23. GTHO

This phrase is used to express the urgency or insistence to leave a place or situation immediately.

  • For example, “This party is terrible, let’s GTHO.”
  • A person might say, “When the fire alarm went off, everyone started shouting GTHO.”
  • When discussing an uncomfortable situation, someone might suggest, “We should GTHO before things get worse.”

24. Giddy up

This phrase is used to express enthusiasm or encouragement to start a task or activity.

  • For instance, “We have a long day ahead, so giddy up!”
  • A person might say, “Giddy up, it’s time to get this party started.”
  • When motivating a team, someone might shout, “Giddy up, let’s win this game!”

25. On your marks

This phrase is often used in a competitive context to indicate that participants should prepare themselves for an upcoming event or activity.

  • For example, a race official might say, “On your marks, get set, go!”
  • A coach might instruct their team, “On your marks, get ready to start the drill.”
  • When preparing for a challenge, someone might say, “On your marks, get focused and give it your all!”

26. Time to roll

This phrase is used to express the readiness to leave or start a journey or activity. It implies a sense of excitement and anticipation.

  • For example, before leaving for a road trip, someone might say, “Time to roll, everyone!”
  • In a sports team huddle, the coach might motivate the players by saying, “It’s game time, time to roll!”
  • When a group of friends is about to head out for a night on the town, one might exclaim, “Alright, time to roll, let’s have some fun!”

27. Hit the road

This phrase is used to indicate the beginning of a journey or trip. It suggests the action of hitting the road or starting the travel.

  • For instance, when leaving for a vacation, someone might say, “Bags are packed, let’s hit the road!”
  • In a travel vlog, the host might say, “Today, we’re hitting the road and exploring a new destination.”
  • When a group of friends is ready to leave a party, one might announce, “Alright, guys, time to hit the road and head home.”

28. Off we go

This phrase is used to signal the beginning of an action or journey. It conveys a sense of excitement and eagerness to start.

  • For example, when embarking on a hike, someone might say, “Alright, off we go!”
  • In a children’s book about a magical adventure, the characters might say, “Hold on tight, off we go!”
  • When a group of friends is about to start a road trip, one might cheerfully announce, “Buckle up, everyone, off we go!”

29. Take off

This phrase is used to indicate the start of a journey or activity. It implies the action of taking off, like an airplane leaving the ground.

  • For instance, before starting a race, a coach might say, “On your marks, get set, take off!”
  • In a travel documentary, the host might say, “As the sun rises, we’re ready to take off and explore this beautiful city.”
  • When a group of friends is about to leave a restaurant, one might say, “Alright, everyone, time to take off and find the next adventure!”

30. Hop on

This phrase is used to invite someone to join in or start a journey or activity. It suggests a sense of inclusion and excitement.

  • For example, when boarding a bus, someone might say, “Hop on, there’s plenty of space!”
  • In a music festival, the performer might say, “Come on, everyone, hop on the dance floor!”
  • When a group of friends is about to go on a road trip, one might say, “Alright, hop on, let’s hit the open road together!”

31. Buckle up

This phrase is used to express the idea of preparing oneself for what is about to happen. It can be used in various situations to indicate that it’s time to get ready for something exciting or challenging.

  • For example, before going on a roller coaster, someone might say, “Buckle up, it’s going to be a wild ride!”
  • In a motivational speech, a speaker might say, “Buckle up, because success is just around the corner.”
  • When starting a new project, a team leader might say, “Buckle up, we have a lot of work ahead of us.”

32. Strap in

This phrase is similar to “buckle up” and is used to indicate that it’s time to prepare oneself for what is about to happen. It can be used in various contexts to express excitement or anticipation.

  • For instance, before a race, someone might say, “Strap in, it’s going to be a fast and intense competition!”
  • When preparing for a roller coaster ride, a friend might say, “Strap in tight, this ride is known for its twists and turns.”
  • In a military operation, a commander might say, “Strap in, we’re about to embark on a mission of great importance.”

33. Ready, set, go

This phrase is commonly used in races or competitions to signal the start of an event. It’s a way to prepare participants for action and create a sense of excitement.

  • For example, before a track race, the announcer might say, “Ready, set, go!”
  • In a children’s game, one child might yell, “Ready, set, go!” to start a race with their friends.
  • When starting a timed challenge, a coach might say, “Ready, set, go! Let’s see who can finish first!”

34. All aboard

This phrase is often used in the context of transportation, especially when boarding a vehicle like a train or a bus. It’s a way to signal that it’s time for everyone to get on board and prepare for departure.

  • For instance, a train conductor might announce, “All aboard, the train is about to leave!”
  • When boarding a tour bus, a guide might say, “All aboard, we’re about to embark on a journey through the city.”
  • In a playful manner, a parent might say, “All aboard the bedtime train, it’s time to go to sleep!”

35. Let’s bounce

This phrase is used to suggest leaving or moving on to the next activity or location. It’s a casual way to indicate that it’s time to go or depart from the current situation.

  • For example, when leaving a party, someone might say, “Let’s bounce, it’s getting late.”
  • In a group chat, someone might suggest, “Let’s bounce from this boring conversation and find something more interesting to do.”
  • When finishing a meeting, a team leader might say, “Let’s bounce and start working on the next task.”

36. Get moving

This phrase is used to encourage someone to start moving or take action. It can be used in various contexts.

  • For example, a coach might say to their team, “Come on, get moving! We need to win this game.”
  • When trying to motivate a friend to start a project, you might say, “Stop procrastinating and get moving on that assignment.”
  • If someone is taking too long to get ready to go out, you could say, “We’re going to be late, get moving!”

37. Start the engines

This phrase is often used metaphorically to mean starting or initiating something, similar to how engines are started before a vehicle can move.

  • For instance, before a big presentation, someone might say, “Let’s start the engines and give it our best.”
  • When planning a party, you might say, “We need to start the engines on the preparations if we want everything ready in time.”
  • If a group of friends is planning a road trip, someone might say, “Okay, everyone, start the engines and let’s hit the road!”

38. Push off

This phrase is used to indicate that it’s time to leave or depart from a place.

  • For example, when leaving a party, you might say, “Well, it’s getting late. Let’s push off.”
  • If you’re ready to leave a meeting, you could say, “I think we’ve covered everything. Let’s push off.”
  • When ending a phone call, you might say, “I’ve got to go now. Let’s push off and talk later.”

39. Make a move

This phrase is often used to encourage someone to take action or make a decision, especially in a situation where they have been hesitant or indecisive.

  • For instance, if someone is unsure about whether to ask someone out on a date, a friend might say, “Come on, make a move and ask them already.”
  • When playing a board game and it’s someone’s turn, you might say, “It’s your move. Make a move and keep the game going.”
  • If a person is contemplating a career change, someone might say, “You’ve been talking about it for a while. It’s time to make a move and pursue your passion.”

40. WYG

This acronym stands for “What You Got” and is often used as a slang expression to ask someone what they have or what they can bring to a situation.

  • For example, if you’re planning a potluck dinner, you might ask a friend, “WYG? What can you bring to the party?”
  • When discussing a group project, someone might ask, “WYG? What skills or resources can you contribute?”
  • In a conversation about talents or abilities, someone might ask, “WYG? What are you good at?”

41. GOGO

This slang term is used to express excitement or encouragement to start moving or take action. It is often used to motivate or cheer someone on.

  • For example, “GOGO, we’re running late!”
  • During a race, a spectator might shout, “GOGO, you can do it!”
  • When a friend is hesitating to try something new, you might say, “GOGO, don’t be afraid to take a chance!”

42. BBL

This abbreviation is commonly used in online messaging to indicate that the person will be away for a short period of time and will return later. It is a quick way to let others know that you will be back.

  • For instance, “I need to grab some groceries, BBL!”
  • A student might say, “I have to go to class, BBL for lunch.”
  • When leaving a virtual meeting, someone might type, “Thanks for the discussion, BBL!”

43. Onward

This word is used to express the idea of moving forward or continuing with a task or journey. It can be used as an exclamation or a motivational phrase.

  • For example, “Onward, to victory!”
  • When faced with a challenge, someone might say, “Onward, we can do this!”
  • A coach might inspire their team by saying, “Onward, don’t give up!”

44. Move it

This phrase is used to tell someone to hurry or move faster. It is often used in a slightly impatient or urgent tone.

  • For instance, “Move it, we’re going to be late!”
  • When trying to catch a bus, someone might shout, “Move it, the bus is about to leave!”
  • During a workout, a trainer might say, “Come on, move it! Push yourself!”

45. Get a move on

This phrase is used to tell someone to start moving or to get going. It is often used when there is a sense of urgency or impatience.

  • For example, “Get a move on, we don’t have much time!”
  • When waiting for someone to leave, you might say, “Get a move on, we need to lock up.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Get a move on, or we’ll be late for school!”

46. Go time

This phrase is used to indicate that it is time to start or begin a particular activity or event.

  • For example, before a race begins, someone might say, “It’s go time!”
  • In a business meeting, a team leader might say, “We’ve prepared everything, it’s go time.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “This is the championship game, it’s go time, give it your all!”

47. Full steam ahead

This phrase is used to express a strong commitment to moving forward with enthusiasm and determination.

  • For instance, when starting a new project, someone might say, “Let’s go full steam ahead!”
  • In a military context, a commander might give the order, “Full steam ahead, troops!”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “Don’t hold back, go full steam ahead towards your goals!”

48. Let’s get cracking

This phrase is used to suggest that it is time to start or begin a task or activity.

  • For example, before a group starts a project, someone might say, “Let’s get cracking!”
  • When preparing for a party, a host might say, “Time is running out, let’s get cracking on the decorations.”
  • A teacher might say to their students, “We have a lot to cover today, so let’s get cracking!”

49. Let’s get this show on the road

This phrase is used to indicate that it is time to start or begin a particular activity or event, especially when there has been a delay or hesitation.

  • For instance, when a group of friends is getting ready to leave for a trip, someone might say, “Alright, let’s get this show on the road!”
  • In a theater production, the director might say, “We’ve rehearsed enough, let’s get this show on the road.”
  • A coach might say to their team before a game, “We’ve trained hard, now let’s get this show on the road!”

50. On your marks, get set, go

This phrase is used to signal the start of a race or competition. It is a countdown that indicates the participants should prepare and be ready to start.

  • For example, before a race begins, the announcer might say, “On your marks, get set, go!”
  • In a school sports day, a teacher might use this phrase to start a race among students.
  • A parent might use this phrase to start a friendly race between their children in the backyard.
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51. Let’s hit the road

This phrase is used to express the idea of beginning a journey or trip, usually by car or other means of transportation.

  • For example, a group of friends might say, “Let’s hit the road and go on a road trip this weekend!”
  • A family might use this phrase when starting a vacation, saying, “Everyone ready? Let’s hit the road!”
  • In a movie, a character might say, “We’ve got a long drive ahead of us. Let’s hit the road and get going.”

52. Let’s make tracks

This phrase is used to suggest leaving a place or starting a journey, often with a sense of urgency or excitement.

  • For instance, if a group of friends is ready to leave a party, they might say, “It’s getting late. Let’s make tracks.”
  • In a work setting, someone might say, “We’ve finished our meeting. Let’s make tracks and get back to work.”
  • A character in a book might say, “We’ve stayed here long enough. Let’s make tracks and find a new adventure.”

53. Let’s get going

This phrase is used to suggest starting or beginning something, often with a sense of urgency or enthusiasm.

  • For example, if a group of friends is planning an activity, someone might say, “It’s getting late. Let’s get going!”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “We can’t waste any more time. Let’s get going and start practicing.”
  • A character in a TV show might say, “We have a lot to do. Let’s get going and tackle these tasks.”

54. Let’s get the ball rolling

This phrase is used to suggest starting or initiating an action or project, often with the intention of getting others involved or moving forward.

  • For instance, in a meeting, someone might say, “We’ve discussed this enough. Let’s get the ball rolling and start implementing our plan.”
  • In a group project, a team member might say, “We need to take the first step. Let’s get the ball rolling and assign tasks.”
  • A character in a play might say, “We can’t wait any longer. Let’s get the ball rolling and rehearse our scenes.”

55. Let’s get moving

This phrase is used to suggest starting or beginning something, often with a sense of urgency or motivation.

  • For example, if a group of friends is planning an outing, someone might say, “We’re running out of time. Let’s get moving!”
  • In a fitness class, an instructor might say, “We need to warm up. Let’s get moving and start stretching.”
  • A character in a novel might say, “We can’t stay here any longer. Let’s get moving and find a safer place.”

56. Let’s get started

This phrase is used to express the desire or intention to start or initiate something. It is often used to motivate or encourage others to start a task or activity.

  • For example, a coach might say, “Alright team, let’s get started with our warm-up drills.”
  • A teacher might say, “Class, let’s get started with today’s lesson.”
  • A friend might say, “We have a lot to do, let’s get started and finish this project.”

57. Let’s rock and roll

This phrase is used to express excitement and readiness to start a task or activity. It is often used to pump up or energize a group of people before starting something.

  • For instance, before a concert, the lead singer might shout, “Are you ready to rock and roll? Let’s go!”
  • A coach might say to their team, “Alright, everyone, let’s rock and roll and give it our all.”
  • A group of friends getting ready for a night out might say, “Let’s rock and roll and have an amazing time!”

58. Let’s kick it

This phrase is used to suggest spending time together or engaging in a casual activity. It is often used to invite someone to relax or have fun.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Hey, let’s kick it at my place and watch a movie.”
  • A group of friends planning a weekend might say, “Let’s kick it at the beach and soak up the sun.”
  • Someone might text their friend, “I’m bored, let’s kick it and grab some coffee.”

59. Let’s get in gear

This phrase is used to encourage action or progress. It is often used to motivate or push someone to start or continue a task or activity.

  • For instance, a coach might say to their team, “Come on, let’s get in gear and give it our all.”
  • A teacher might say to their students, “Time to get in gear and start working on your assignments.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “We have a busy day ahead, let’s get in gear and get ready.”

60. Let’s go on an adventure

This phrase is used to suggest going on a journey or exploring new places. It is often used to invite someone to have an exciting or memorable experience.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I’m in the mood for an adventure, let’s go on an adventure and discover something new.”
  • A couple planning a vacation might say, “Let’s go on an adventure and travel to a place we’ve never been before.”
  • A parent might say to their children, “Put on your hiking shoes, let’s go on an adventure and explore the great outdoors.”

61. VAMOS

Vamos is a Spanish word that translates to “Let’s Go” in English. It is often used to express excitement or enthusiasm to start or begin something.

  • For example, a group of friends might say, “Vamos!” before heading out for a night on the town.
  • In a sports context, a coach might shout, “Vamos, team!” to motivate their players.
  • A person might use it to encourage someone to take action, saying, “Vamos, don’t be afraid to try something new!”

62. HURRY UP

Hurry up is a phrase used to urge someone to move or act quickly. It is often used when there is a sense of urgency or a need to finish something promptly.

  • For instance, a parent might say to their child, “Hurry up, we’re going to be late for school!”
  • In a work setting, a boss might tell an employee, “Hurry up and finish that report before the deadline.”
  • A friend might say to another friend, “Hurry up and get ready, the movie starts in 10 minutes!”

63. CHOP CHOP

Chop chop is a phrase used to tell someone to hurry up or get moving. It is often used in a playful or lighthearted manner, but can also convey a sense of urgency.

  • For example, a teacher might say to their students, “Alright class, chop chop, let’s finish our assignments.”
  • A parent might use it to motivate their child, saying, “Chop chop, we need to clean up before guests arrive.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say to another colleague, “Chop chop, we have a deadline to meet!”

64. ROLL OUT

Roll out is a phrase used to suggest that it’s time to go or get started with something. It can be used in various contexts to indicate the beginning of an activity or event.

  • For instance, a team leader might say, “Alright everyone, let’s roll out and start the project.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might announce, “The food is ready, let’s roll out and grab a plate!”
  • A coach might use it to motivate their team, saying, “Time to roll out onto the field and show them what we’re made of!”

65. GET CRACKING

Get cracking is a phrase used to encourage someone to start or begin something immediately. It implies a sense of urgency or the need to take action promptly.

  • For example, a teacher might say to their students, “Alright class, let’s get cracking on our assignments.”
  • A supervisor might use it to motivate their team, saying, “We have a tight deadline, so let’s get cracking and finish this project.”
  • A friend might say to another friend, “We’ve been talking about it for too long, let’s get cracking and make it happen!”

66. TIME TO BOUNCE

This phrase is used to indicate that it’s time to leave or go to a different location. It can be used in various situations to express the desire to move on or change the current setting.

  • For example, if a group of friends is at a party that’s getting boring, someone might say, “Time to bounce, this place is dead.”
  • When a concert is over and people are leaving, someone might shout, “Time to bounce, let’s beat the crowd.”
  • If a person is tired of waiting at a restaurant for their order, they might say, “I’ve had enough, time to bounce and find another place to eat.”