Top 71 Slang For Leverage – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to navigating social situations and getting what you want, having the right words at your disposal can be a game-changer. That’s why we’ve put together a list of the top slang for leverage that will help you ace negotiations, win arguments, and come out on top. Whether you’re trying to seal the deal or simply assert yourself, these phrases will give you the upper hand. Get ready to level up your communication skills and master the art of leverage!

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1. Juice

This term refers to the influence or power that someone has, especially in a specific context or situation. It can also mean the ability to get what you want or to have an advantage over others.

  • For example, “He used his political juice to get the bill passed.”
  • In a discussion about social media, someone might say, “Having a large following gives you more juice in the industry.”
  • A person talking about negotiation tactics might advise, “Use your leverage to gain more juice in the deal.”

2. Clout

Clout refers to the influence or prestige that someone has, often due to their reputation or connections. It can also mean having a significant impact or being able to make things happen.

  • For instance, “She has a lot of clout in the fashion industry.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “The endorsement from that influential figure gave the candidate a lot of clout.”
  • A person discussing social media might comment, “Having a verified account gives you more clout on the platform.”

3. Pull

To have pull means to have influence or connections that can be used to your advantage. It can also mean being able to get someone to do something for you.

  • For example, “He used his pull with the CEO to get a promotion.”
  • In a discussion about job hunting, someone might say, “Having connections in the industry can give you a lot of pull.”
  • A person giving advice on networking might say, “Build relationships with influential people to increase your pull.”

4. Weight

Weight refers to the influence or importance that someone or something carries. It can also mean having significant authority or impact in a particular area.

  • For instance, “Her opinion carries a lot of weight in the scientific community.”
  • In a discussion about decision-making, someone might say, “Consider the opinions of those who hold more weight in the matter.”
  • A person talking about leadership might comment, “A good leader understands the weight of their decisions and takes responsibility for them.”

5. Rank

Rank refers to a person’s position or authority within a hierarchy or organization. It can also mean having a high level of influence or power.

  • For example, “He holds a high rank in the military.”
  • In a discussion about promotions, someone might say, “Your rank within the company will determine your salary.”
  • A person discussing social status might comment, “Your rank in society shouldn’t define your worth as a person.”

6. Ascendancy

This term refers to a position of power or control over others. It implies a higher level of authority or influence.

  • For example, “The company gained ascendancy in the market after acquiring its main competitor.”
  • In a political context, one might say, “The party’s ascendancy has allowed them to pass major legislation.”
  • A sports commentator might note, “The team’s ascendancy in recent years has been remarkable.”

7. Sway

Sway refers to the power to change or affect someone’s opinion or decision. It implies having a persuasive or convincing effect on others.

  • For instance, “Her charismatic personality swayed the jury to acquit the defendant.”
  • In a political context, one might say, “The senator’s speech swayed public opinion on the issue.”
  • A marketing expert might advise, “Using emotional appeals can help sway consumers to buy your product.”

8. Muscle

Muscle is a slang term used to describe the use of physical or metaphorical strength to exert power or influence over others.

  • For example, “The mob boss used his muscle to control the neighborhood.”
  • In a business context, one might say, “The company relied on its financial muscle to dominate the market.”
  • A sports commentator might note, “The team’s star player provides the muscle needed to win games.”

9. Stroke

Stroke, in this context, refers to the act of manipulating or influencing someone in order to gain an advantage or control over them.

  • For instance, “He stroked the boss’s ego to get a promotion.”
  • In a political context, one might say, “The lobbyist stroked the senator’s campaign fund to gain support for their agenda.”
  • A salesperson might use tactics like flattery to stroke a potential customer into making a purchase.

10. Swagger

Swagger refers to a confident and often arrogant or dominant manner of walking, talking, or behaving. It implies a sense of self-assuredness and superiority.

  • For example, “He walked into the room with a swagger, exuding confidence.”
  • In a sports context, one might say, “The star athlete’s swagger on the field intimidates their opponents.”
  • A teenager might describe a popular classmate as having “swagger” due to their confident demeanor.

11. Cachet

Refers to the level of respect, admiration, or recognition that someone or something has. It can be associated with having a high social standing or being seen as valuable or important.

  • For example, “The brand’s cachet comes from its reputation for luxury and exclusivity.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might say, “Wearing designer labels gives you cachet in certain circles.”
  • A person might aspire to have cachet in their career and say, “I want to build a successful business and gain cachet in my industry.”

12. Swag

Often used to describe someone or something that has a certain level of confidence, charisma, or attractiveness. It can also refer to free promotional items or goodies given out at events.

  • For instance, “He walked into the room with so much swag, all eyes were on him.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “She always dresses with swag and stands out from the crowd.”
  • A person might receive a swag bag at a conference and say, “Look at all the swag I got!”

13. Street cred

Refers to the level of recognition or admiration someone has within a specific group or subculture, often associated with the streets or urban environments.

  • For example, “He earned street cred by proving himself in the rap battle scene.”
  • In a discussion about skateboarding, someone might say, “His tricks and style give him street cred among other skaters.”
  • A person might admire someone’s street cred and say, “He’s got the respect of the neighborhood because of his actions.”

14. Street smarts

Refers to a person’s ability to navigate and thrive in urban or street environments, often associated with being savvy, resourceful, and aware of potential dangers or scams.

  • For instance, “She survived in the city by relying on her street smarts.”
  • In a conversation about traveling, someone might say, “Having street smarts is essential when exploring unfamiliar cities.”
  • A person might advise someone to use their street smarts and say, “Be aware of your surroundings and trust your instincts.”

15. Game

Refers to the ability to navigate social or professional situations effectively, often associated with charisma, confidence, and the ability to influence or persuade others.

  • For example, “He’s got game when it comes to networking and building connections.”
  • In a discussion about dating, someone might say, “You need to step up your game if you want to impress that person.”
  • A person might compliment someone’s game and say, “You’ve got the skills to succeed in any situation.”

16. Hookup

In this context, a “hookup” refers to a connection or contact that can provide an advantage or access to something. It can be used to describe a person who has the ability to provide information, resources, or opportunities.

  • For example, someone might say, “I have a hookup at the company who can get us discounted tickets.”
  • In a discussion about job searching, a person might ask, “Does anyone have a hookup at that company?”
  • A friend might offer, “I can introduce you to my hookup who works in the music industry.”

17. Plug

To “plug” something means to promote or endorse it. In the context of leverage, a “plug” refers to a person or connection that can provide access to valuable information, resources, or opportunities.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I know a plug who can get us VIP access to the event.”
  • In a conversation about finding rare items, a person might ask, “Do you have a plug for limited edition sneakers?”
  • A friend might recommend, “You should talk to my plug who works in the fashion industry.”

18. Connect

To “connect” with someone means to establish a relationship or form a bond, usually for mutual benefit. In the context of leverage, “connect” refers to establishing a contact or relationship that can provide advantages or opportunities.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to connect with influential people in the industry to expand my business.”
  • In a discussion about job searching, a person might ask, “Can you connect me with anyone at that company?”
  • A friend might offer, “I can connect you with my friend who is a successful entrepreneur.”

19. Inside track

Having the “inside track” means having an advantageous position or access to privileged information. It refers to having an edge or advantage over others in a particular situation.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have the inside track on the upcoming project, so I know what to expect.”
  • In a conversation about sports betting, a person might say, “I have the inside track on the team’s performance, so I know they will win.”
  • A friend might mention, “My cousin works at the company, so I have the inside track on job openings.”

20. Upper hand

Having the “upper hand” means having an advantage or being in a superior position in a situation. It refers to having more control or power compared to others involved.

  • For example, someone might say, “I negotiated a better deal and got the upper hand in the business transaction.”
  • In a discussion about a conflict, a person might say, “I need to gain the upper hand to resolve this issue.”
  • A friend might advise, “If you want to win the game, you need to strategize and gain the upper hand.”

21. Edge

In the context of leverage, “edge” refers to having an advantage over someone or something. It can be used to describe a situation where one person or group has a slight advantage over another.

  • For example, in a negotiation, someone might say, “I have the edge because I know their bottom line.”
  • In a competitive sport, a commentator might say, “The home team has the edge with their strong offense.”
  • A business owner might say, “Our innovative product gives us the edge in the market.”

22. Leverage point

A “leverage point” is a specific area or aspect that can be used to gain an advantage or exert influence. It refers to a strategic point that can be manipulated to achieve a desired outcome.

  • For instance, in a business negotiation, someone might say, “Finding their weak points will give us leverage in the deal.”
  • In a political campaign, a strategist might identify certain policies as leverage points to win over voters.
  • A coach might say, “Our team’s speed is a leverage point against our opponents.”

23. Trump card

A “trump card” is a metaphorical term referring to a resource or strategy that can be used to gain an advantage or secure a victory. It is often used to describe a hidden or unexpected advantage that can turn the tide in one’s favor.

  • For example, in a card game, a player might say, “I kept my best card as a trump card to win the final round.”
  • In a debate, someone might reveal a surprising statistic as their trump card to sway the audience.
  • A negotiator might say, “I’m saving this information as my trump card to use at the right moment.”

24. Say

In the context of leverage, “say” refers to having the power or ability to influence decisions or outcomes. It can be used to describe the level of control or authority one has in a situation.

  • For instance, in a group project, someone might say, “I have a say in how we allocate the tasks.”
  • In a company, a manager might have the final say in approving budgets or making important decisions.
  • A team leader might say, “Everyone’s opinion matters, but ultimately I have the final say.”

25. Command

In the context of leverage, “command” refers to having control or authority over a situation or person. It implies the ability to make decisions and have them followed.

  • For example, a military general might command their troops to execute a specific strategy.
  • In a business setting, a CEO might command their employees to implement a new policy.
  • A coach might say, “Our team needs to command the game from the start to secure a victory.”

26. Domination

This term refers to the act of taking complete control or overpowering someone or something.

  • For example, in a sports context, a team might say, “We dominated the game and won by a large margin.”
  • In a business setting, a company might aim to “dominate the market” by having the largest share and influence.
  • A person discussing their personal achievements might say, “I dominated the competition and came out on top.”

27. Grip

This term refers to a strong hold or control over a situation or object.

  • For instance, in a physical sense, a person might say, “I had a firm grip on the handle.”
  • In a metaphorical sense, someone might say, “She has a tight grip on the company’s finances.”
  • A person describing a difficult situation might say, “The situation slipped out of my grip and became chaotic.”

28. Hold

This term refers to maintaining control or possession over something.

  • For example, in a game, a team might say, “We held the lead until the end.”
  • In a negotiation, someone might say, “We need to hold our ground and not give in to their demands.”
  • A person describing their emotions might say, “I’m trying to hold back my tears.”

29. Leverage

This term refers to using an advantage or position of strength to gain more or achieve a desired outcome.

  • For instance, in a business context, someone might say, “We can leverage our existing customer base to launch a new product.”
  • In a personal context, a person might say, “I’m leveraging my network to find a job.”
  • A person discussing negotiation tactics might say, “You need to leverage your strengths to get the best deal.”

30. Advantage

This term refers to a favorable position or circumstance that gives someone an edge over others.

  • For example, in a sports context, a team might say, “We have the advantage going into the next round.”
  • In a competitive job market, a person might say, “Having a degree gives me an advantage over other applicants.”
  • A person discussing strategy might say, “We need to find our competitors’ weaknesses and use them to our advantage.”

31. Control

The act of exerting influence or authority over something or someone. “Control” is often used to describe having power or command over a situation or individual.

  • For example, a manager might say, “I need to maintain control over this project.”
  • In a discussion about personal relationships, someone might say, “She always tries to control every aspect of my life.”
  • A person discussing their own actions might admit, “I struggle with impulse control.”

32. Mastery

The state of being highly skilled or knowledgeable in a particular subject or activity. “Mastery” implies a high level of proficiency and understanding.

  • For instance, a musician might say, “After years of practice, I finally achieved mastery of the piano.”
  • In a conversation about sports, someone might comment, “Michael Jordan’s mastery of basketball is unmatched.”
  • A person discussing their career might say, “I’ve reached a point where I feel like I have mastery over my field.”

33. Supremacy

The state of being superior or having ultimate authority or control over others. “Supremacy” implies being at the top or highest position in a hierarchy.

  • For example, a political leader might declare, “Our country will strive for economic supremacy.”
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might argue, “The team with the most wins has proven their supremacy in the league.”
  • A person discussing a competition might say, “He challenged me to a game of chess, but I showed my supremacy by winning in just a few moves.”

34. Reign

The period of time during which a person holds power or authority over others. “Reign” often refers to a monarch’s rule, but can also be used metaphorically to describe someone’s influence or control.

  • For instance, a historian might say, “Queen Victoria’s reign lasted from 1837 to 1901.”
  • In a discussion about a company, someone might comment, “Under his reign, the company experienced significant growth.”
  • A person discussing their own impact might say, “During my reign as team captain, we won three championships in a row.”

35. Rule

The act of exercising authority or control over a group or situation. “Rule” implies having power or dominion over others.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “In my classroom, I set the rules and expect everyone to follow them.”
  • In a discussion about government, someone might argue, “The rule of law is essential for a functioning society.”
  • A person discussing their own behavior might admit, “I tend to break the rules and do things my own way.”

36. Authority

This refers to the power or right to give orders, make decisions, and enforce obedience. In the context of slang for leverage, “authority” can be used to describe someone who has a lot of influence and control over a situation.

  • For example, “He has the authority to make the final decision on this matter.”
  • In a discussion about leadership, someone might say, “A good leader should have both authority and empathy.”
  • A person might assert their authority by saying, “I’m in charge here, so you need to listen to me.”

37. Influence

This term refers to the ability to have an effect on someone or something. In the context of slang for leverage, “influence” can be used to describe someone who has the power to persuade or shape opinions.

  • For instance, “She has a lot of influence over her followers on social media.”
  • In a discussion about marketing, someone might say, “Influencers have become an important tool for brands to reach their target audience.”
  • A person might seek to increase their influence by saying, “I want to be able to influence people’s opinions and make a positive impact.”

38. Dominance

This term refers to having power and control over others. In the context of slang for leverage, “dominance” can be used to describe someone who is in a position of power and exerts their authority over others.

  • For example, “He asserted his dominance by winning every competition.”
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might say, “The team showed their dominance by winning the championship.”
  • A person might assert their dominance by saying, “I’m the boss here, and I expect everyone to follow my lead.”

39. Power

This term refers to the ability to do something or act in a certain way. In the context of slang for leverage, “power” can be used to describe someone who has the ability to control or influence others.

  • For instance, “She wields a lot of power in the business world.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “Those in power have the ability to make and enforce laws.”
  • A person might assert their power by saying, “I have the power to make or break your career, so be careful.”

40. Squeeze

This term refers to applying force or pressure to something. In the context of slang for leverage, “squeeze” can be used to describe a situation where someone is applying pressure or exerting influence to get what they want.

  • For example, “He tried to squeeze more money out of the deal.”
  • In a discussion about negotiations, someone might say, “You need to apply some squeeze to get a better deal.”
  • A person might use this term to describe their tactics by saying, “I know how to apply the right amount of squeeze to get what I want.”

41. Clench

To firmly grasp or hold onto something. “Clench” can also refer to exerting control or power over a situation.

  • For example, a person might say, “I clenched my fists in anger.”
  • In a negotiation, someone might clench their power by saying, “I have the upper hand in this deal.”
  • A person discussing a difficult situation might say, “She clenched her teeth and powered through the challenge.”

42. Maneuver

A strategic or skillful move made to gain an advantage or achieve a specific outcome. “Maneuver” can also refer to navigating through a complex situation or obstacle.

  • For instance, a military general might plan a maneuver to outflank the enemy.
  • In a game of chess, a player might make a clever maneuver to trap their opponent’s king.
  • A person discussing a business deal might say, “We need to maneuver carefully to secure the best terms.”

43. Stratagem

A clever or cunning plan or scheme designed to deceive or outwit someone. “Stratagem” often involves using tactics or strategies to gain an advantage or achieve a specific goal.

  • For example, a spy might employ a stratagem to infiltrate enemy lines undetected.
  • In a political campaign, a candidate might use a stratagem to discredit their opponent.
  • A person discussing a competitive situation might say, “We need to come up with a stratagem to outsmart our rivals.”

44. Ploy

A cunning or clever move made to deceive or manipulate someone. “Ploy” often refers to a strategic action taken to achieve an advantage or achieve a specific outcome.

  • For instance, a person might use a ploy to distract their opponent and gain the upper hand.
  • In a negotiation, someone might employ a ploy to get the other party to lower their offer.
  • A person discussing a game or sport might say, “His last-minute ploy secured the victory for his team.”

45. Scheme

A plan or plot, often involving clever or devious tactics, to achieve a specific outcome. “Scheme” can also refer to a systematic or organized plan of action.

  • For example, a group of criminals might devise a scheme to rob a bank.
  • In a heist movie, the main characters often come up with an elaborate scheme to carry out their plan.
  • A person discussing a project might say, “We need to come up with a scheme to streamline our workflow and increase efficiency.”

46. Gambit

A gambit refers to a strategic move or maneuver made to gain an advantage, often in a game or competition. It involves taking a calculated risk to achieve a desired outcome.

  • For example, in chess, a player might use the Queen’s Gambit to sacrifice a pawn for a positional advantage.
  • In negotiations, someone might say, “I’m going to play my trump card and use a gambit to get them to lower the price.”
  • A business executive might use a gambit to gain market share by launching a new product at a lower price point.
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47. Ruse

A ruse is a deceptive tactic or strategy used to trick or deceive someone. It involves creating a false impression or diversion to gain an advantage or achieve a specific outcome.

  • For instance, a spy might employ a ruse to infiltrate an enemy base by pretending to be a janitor.
  • In a game of poker, a player might use a ruse by bluffing and pretending to have a strong hand.
  • A salesperson might use a ruse by offering a limited-time discount to create a sense of urgency and encourage a purchase.

48. Trick

A trick refers to a deceptive action or maneuver used to deceive or outsmart someone. It involves using cunning or deceit to achieve a desired outcome.

  • For example, a magician performs tricks to create illusions and entertain an audience.
  • In a prank, someone might play a trick on their friend by hiding their keys.
  • In a competitive sport, a player might use a trick play to catch the opposing team off guard and score a goal.

49. Artifice

An artifice is a clever strategy or tactic used to manipulate or deceive someone. It involves using cunning or ingenuity to achieve a specific goal.

  • For instance, a con artist uses various artifices to trick people into giving them money.
  • In a political campaign, a candidate might use artifices to sway public opinion and gain support.
  • A business might employ artifices in their marketing to create a sense of urgency and drive sales.

50. Tactic

A tactic refers to a strategic approach or method used to achieve a specific goal or outcome. It involves making calculated decisions and taking specific actions to gain an advantage.

  • For example, in a game of soccer, a team might use a pressing tactic to put pressure on the opposing team and regain possession of the ball.
  • In a business negotiation, someone might use a bargaining tactic to gain concessions from the other party.
  • A military commander might employ different tactics to outmaneuver the enemy and win a battle.
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51. Strategy

A strategy refers to a plan of action designed to achieve a specific goal or objective. It involves making choices and decisions to allocate resources and utilize tactics effectively.

  • For example, a business might develop a marketing strategy to increase sales and reach a wider audience.
  • In a game of chess, a player might say, “My strategy is to control the center of the board and launch an attack on the opponent’s king.”
  • A military general might devise a strategy to outmaneuver the enemy and secure victory.

52. Approach

An approach refers to a particular way of dealing with a situation or problem. It involves a set of principles or methods used to tackle a task or achieve a desired outcome.

  • For instance, a teacher might adopt a hands-on approach to engage students and enhance their learning experience.
  • In a job interview, a candidate might explain their approach to problem-solving by saying, “I like to break down complex problems into smaller, manageable steps.”
  • A therapist might use a holistic approach to address a client’s mental, emotional, and physical well-being.

53. Method

A method refers to a specific procedure or process used to accomplish a task or achieve a goal. It involves a systematic approach or set of steps that are followed to produce a desired result.

  • For example, a chef might use the sauté method to quickly cook vegetables in a hot pan with oil.
  • In a scientific experiment, a researcher might employ the scientific method to test a hypothesis and gather data.
  • A musician might use the fingerpicking method to play a guitar, plucking the strings with their fingers instead of using a pick.

54. Technique

A technique refers to a skillful or specialized method used to perform a task or achieve a desired outcome. It involves a specific approach or set of actions that require practice and expertise to execute effectively.

  • For instance, a painter might use the impasto technique to apply thick layers of paint to create texture and depth in a painting.
  • In martial arts, a practitioner might use the grappling technique to immobilize an opponent during a fight.
  • A photographer might use the long exposure technique to capture light trails and create a sense of motion in a photograph.
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55. Skill

A skill refers to the ability to perform a task or activity with competence and expertise. It involves a combination of knowledge, practice, and experience that enables a person to accomplish a task effectively.

  • For example, a professional basketball player might have excellent shooting skills, allowing them to consistently make baskets from various positions on the court.
  • In the field of medicine, a surgeon’s skill is crucial in performing complex surgeries with precision and minimizing risks.
  • A chef’s knife skills are essential for chopping, slicing, and dicing ingredients quickly and accurately.

56. Expertise

This refers to a high level of skill or knowledge in a particular field or subject. Expertise implies a deep understanding and proficiency that comes from experience and practice.

  • For example, “She has years of expertise in marketing strategy.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might say, “I can bring my expertise in project management to this role.”
  • A colleague might seek advice, saying, “I need your expertise on this complex problem.”

57. Knowledge

Knowledge refers to information, facts, or skills acquired through experience, education, or training. It is the awareness or familiarity with something, often backed by factual evidence.

  • For instance, “He has extensive knowledge of ancient history.”
  • In a classroom setting, a student might say, “I’m seeking knowledge about the solar system.”
  • A trivia enthusiast might exclaim, “I have a vast knowledge of random facts!”

58. Understanding

Understanding refers to the ability to grasp or comprehend something. It involves interpreting and making sense of information or concepts.

  • For example, “She has a deep understanding of human psychology.”
  • In a philosophical discussion, someone might say, “True understanding comes from questioning and reflection.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Do you have a clear understanding of the math problem?”

59. Comprehension

Comprehension refers to the ability to understand or make sense of something. It involves mentally grasping or comprehending information, often through reading or listening.

  • For instance, “The book requires a high level of comprehension.”
  • In a language class, a teacher might say, “Let’s check your comprehension of the reading passage.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Do you have a good grasp of the concept?”

60. Grasp

Grasp refers to the ability to comprehend or understand something. It implies a firm hold on a concept or idea, often through mental or physical means.

  • For example, “He quickly grasped the complex mathematical problem.”
  • In a training session, an instructor might say, “Make sure you have a firm grasp of the safety procedures.”
  • A student might ask a teacher, “Can you help me improve my grasp of the subject?”

61. Impact

The impact refers to the influence or effect that something has on a situation or outcome.

  • For example, “The new policy had a significant impact on the company’s profits.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, one might say, “The impact of global warming is evident in the rising sea levels.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The player’s injury had a big impact on the team’s performance.”

62. Effect

The effect refers to the result or consequence of an action or event.

  • For instance, “The effect of the new law was a decrease in crime rates.”
  • In a conversation about medication, one might say, “The side effects of the drug include drowsiness and nausea.”
  • A person discussing advertising might mention, “The ad campaign had a positive effect on brand awareness.”

63. Result

The result refers to the outcome or consequence of a particular action or event.

  • For example, “The result of the election was a landslide victory for the incumbent.”
  • In a discussion about a scientific experiment, one might say, “The result of the study confirmed the hypothesis.”
  • A coach might say, “The team’s hard work and dedication led to a positive result in the championship game.”

64. Outcome

The outcome refers to the final result or consequence of a series of actions or events.

  • For instance, “The outcome of the negotiation was a mutually beneficial agreement.”
  • In a conversation about a legal case, one might say, “The outcome of the trial determined the defendant’s fate.”
  • A person discussing a business venture might mention, “The outcome of the investment was a significant return on investment.”

65. Consequence

The consequence refers to the result or effect that follows from a particular action or decision.

  • For example, “The consequence of skipping class was a failing grade.”
  • In a discussion about environmental pollution, one might say, “The consequences of pollution are far-reaching and detrimental.”
  • A parent might warn their child, “Think about the consequences of your actions before making a decision.”

66. Effectiveness

This term refers to the ability of something to produce the desired result or achieve its intended purpose. It is often used to describe how well a strategy or approach works.

  • For example, “The effectiveness of this marketing campaign can be measured by the increase in sales.”
  • A manager might say, “We need to improve the effectiveness of our team by streamlining our processes.”
  • In a performance review, a supervisor might comment, “John’s effectiveness in meeting deadlines has been outstanding.”

67. Efficacy

Similar to effectiveness, efficacy refers to the ability of something to produce the desired outcome. It is often used in a more formal or technical context, such as in medical or scientific discussions.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “The efficacy of this medication has been proven in clinical trials.”
  • A researcher might discuss the efficacy of a new treatment approach, saying, “Preliminary studies suggest high efficacy rates.”
  • In a business presentation, a speaker might highlight the efficacy of a new software system in improving productivity.

68. Streetwise

This term describes someone who is knowledgeable and savvy about the realities of city life, particularly in terms of navigating potentially dangerous or challenging situations.

  • For example, “She grew up in a rough neighborhood, so she’s streetwise and knows how to handle herself.”
  • A character in a novel might be described as “streetwise” due to their ability to navigate the city’s underground networks.
  • In a conversation about personal safety, someone might say, “Being streetwise means being aware of your surroundings and avoiding risky situations.”

69. Advantageous position

This term refers to being in a position that gives someone an advantage or favorable circumstances in a particular situation.

  • For instance, “By negotiating from a position of strength, she was able to secure an advantageous deal.”
  • In a game of chess, a player might say, “I’ve put myself in an advantageous position by controlling the center of the board.”
  • A businessperson might discuss the importance of gaining an advantageous position in the market to stay ahead of competitors.

70. Ace up one’s sleeve

This phrase originates from card games, where having an ace up one’s sleeve is a secret advantage that can be used to win a game. It is now used figuratively to describe any hidden advantage or secret resource that can be used to gain an edge in a situation.

  • For example, “He always keeps an ace up his sleeve during negotiations, so he usually gets what he wants.”
  • In a discussion about job interviews, someone might say, “Having a strong network can be your ace up your sleeve when searching for a new job.”
  • A character in a movie might reveal their ace up their sleeve at a crucial moment to turn the tide of a conflict.

71. Masterstroke

A “masterstroke” is a brilliant or strategic move that is executed with skill and precision. It refers to a decisive action that achieves a desired outcome or advantage.

  • For example, in a game of chess, a player might make a masterstroke by sacrificing a piece to gain a strategic position.
  • In a business context, a company might make a masterstroke by launching a groundbreaking product that revolutionizes the industry.
  • A sports team might pull off a masterstroke by implementing a unique strategy that catches their opponents off guard.