Top 32 Slang For Lieutenant – Meaning & Usage

Lieutenant is a term commonly used in military contexts, but did you know that there are also slang words and phrases that refer to this rank? From the lingo of the armed forces to pop culture references, we’ve compiled a list of the top slang for lieutenant that will surely make you feel like you’re part of the squad. So gear up and get ready to learn some new lingo that will have you standing tall and proud!

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1. LT

This is a common abbreviation for “lieutenant,” a military rank below captain. It is often used to refer to a lieutenant in any branch of the armed forces.

  • For example, “The LT led the platoon into battle.”
  • In a discussion about military ranks, someone might ask, “What’s the difference between a LT and a captain?”
  • A soldier might say, “I’m hoping to be promoted to LT soon.”

2. Skipper

Although “skipper” is typically used to refer to the captain of a ship, it is sometimes used as slang for a lieutenant. This term is often used in a more informal or lighthearted context.

  • For instance, “The skipper gave the orders for the mission.”
  • In a conversation about naval ranks, someone might ask, “Who outranks a skipper?”
  • A sailor might say, “I’m proud to serve under the skipper.”

3. Top

“Top” is a slang term used to refer to a first lieutenant, which is the highest-ranking lieutenant. It is often used in a military or organizational context to indicate a position of authority or leadership.

  • For example, “The top called for a meeting to discuss the mission.”
  • In a discussion about lieutenant ranks, someone might ask, “What’s the difference between a top and a LT?”
  • A soldier might say, “I’m hoping to become a top one day.”

4. Sir

Although “sir” is a more general term of respect, it can also be used as a slang term for a lieutenant. It is often used to show respect or deference to someone of higher rank.

  • For instance, “Yes, sir. I’ll complete the mission as ordered.”
  • In a conversation about military etiquette, someone might ask, “When should I address a lieutenant as sir?”
  • A soldier might say, “I always show respect to my sir.”

5. Boss

While “boss” is not a specific term for a lieutenant, it can be used as slang to refer to someone in a leadership position, including a lieutenant. It is often used in a more informal or colloquial context.

  • For example, “The boss gave us our assignments for the day.”
  • In a discussion about military leadership, someone might ask, “Is a lieutenant considered a boss?”
  • A soldier might say, “I’m lucky to have a great boss like my lieutenant.”

6. Skip

A nickname for a lieutenant, often used in a naval or maritime context. The term “skipper” is a casual and familiar way to refer to a lieutenant, emphasizing their role as the leader or captain of a ship or boat.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “The skipper is in charge of the ship.”
  • In a conversation about naval ranks, someone might ask, “Is a skipper the same as a lieutenant?”
  • A person discussing their experience in the navy might mention, “I served under a great skipper during my time at sea.”

7. Chief

In some military contexts, “chief” can be used as slang for a lieutenant. The term “top brass” is a colloquial expression that refers to high-ranking officers, including lieutenants.

  • For instance, a soldier might say, “The chief gave us clear orders for the mission.”
  • In a discussion about military hierarchy, someone might ask, “Who is considered top brass in the army?”
  • A person sharing their military experience might mention, “I had the opportunity to work closely with the top brass during my time in the service.”

8. Captain

In certain contexts, “captain” can be used as slang for a lieutenant. The term “skipper” is a casual and familiar way to refer to a lieutenant, highlighting their role as the leader or captain of a unit or team.

  • For example, a soldier might say, “The captain gave us clear instructions for the mission.”
  • In a conversation about military ranks, someone might ask, “Is a captain the same as a lieutenant?”
  • A person discussing their time in the army might mention, “I had the opportunity to serve under a great skipper during my deployment.”

9. El-Tee

A shortened version of “lieutenant,” “El-Tee” is a slang term often used to refer to a lieutenant in informal or conversational settings. The term is derived from the pronunciation of the letters “L” and “T” in “LT.”

  • For instance, a soldier might say, “I reported to the El-Tee for my assignment.”
  • In a discussion about military ranks, someone might ask, “What’s the abbreviation for lieutenant?” and another person might reply, “It’s ‘El-Tee’.”
  • A person sharing their experience in the armed forces might mention, “I had the privilege of serving alongside some exceptional El-Tees during my time in the military.”

10. Lieutenant Commander

A lieutenant commander is a high-ranking officer in the military, often abbreviated as “LC.” While not strictly slang, “LC” is a shortened form commonly used in spoken language or informal writing to refer to a lieutenant commander.

  • For example, a sailor might say, “The LC gave us strategic guidance for the mission.”
  • In a conversation about naval ranks, someone might ask, “What does ‘LC’ stand for?” and another person might reply, “It’s short for lieutenant commander.”
  • A person discussing their naval career might mention, “I had the privilege of serving under some exceptional LCs during my time in the navy.”

11. LTJG

This is a naval rank used in the United States Navy and Coast Guard. LTJG is the abbreviation for Lieutenant Junior Grade, which is equivalent to the rank of First Lieutenant in the Army and Marine Corps.

  • For example, “LTJG Smith is in charge of navigation on the ship.”
  • In a conversation about military ranks, one might say, “LTJG is the first rank where officers are referred to as ‘Lieutenant’.”
  • A naval officer might introduce themselves as, “I’m LTJG Johnson, pleased to meet you.”

12. XO

The XO is the second-in-command on a ship or military unit. The term “XO” is an abbreviation for Executive Officer, and they are responsible for assisting the commanding officer in managing the unit.

  • For instance, “The XO coordinates the daily operations of the ship.”
  • In a discussion about military leadership, one might say, “The XO is crucial in maintaining the unit’s efficiency and morale.”
  • A sailor might ask, “When will the XO be back from shore leave?”

13. LTCDR

This is a naval rank used in the United States Navy and Coast Guard. LTCDR is the abbreviation for Lieutenant Commander, which is equivalent to the rank of Major in the Army and Marine Corps.

  • For example, “LTCDR Johnson is in charge of the engineering department.”
  • In a conversation about military ranks, one might say, “LTCDR is the rank between Lieutenant and Commander.”
  • A naval officer might introduce themselves as, “I’m LTCDR Smith, pleased to meet you.”

14. LT COL

This is a military rank used in the United States Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps. LT COL is the abbreviation for Lieutenant Colonel, which is equivalent to the rank of Commander in the Navy and Coast Guard.

  • For instance, “LT COL Davis is the commanding officer of the battalion.”
  • In a discussion about military hierarchy, one might say, “LT COL is the rank between Major and Colonel.”
  • A soldier might ask, “When will LT COL Smith be back from deployment?”

15. LTGEN

This is a military rank used in the United States Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps. LTGEN is the abbreviation for Lieutenant General, which is equivalent to the rank of Vice Admiral in the Navy and Coast Guard.

  • For example, “LTGEN Johnson is the highest-ranking officer in the division.”
  • In a conversation about military ranks, one might say, “LTGEN is the rank between Major General and General.”
  • A military officer might introduce themselves as, “I’m LTGEN Smith, pleased to meet you.”

16. Cap

This slang term is used to refer to a Lieutenant, specifically a Lieutenant who has been promoted to the rank of Captain. It is often used in military contexts.

  • For example, in a military conversation, someone might say, “I reported to Cap for my assignment.”
  • In a discussion about military ranks, one might mention, “A Lieutenant can eventually be promoted to Cap.”
  • A soldier might express respect for their superior by saying, “Cap is a great leader.”

17. LTCOL

This slang term is used to refer to a Lieutenant, specifically a Lieutenant who has been promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. It is often used in military contexts.

  • For instance, in a military discussion, someone might say, “LTCOL Smith has years of experience.”
  • In a conversation about military hierarchy, one might explain, “A Lieutenant can progress to the rank of LTCOL.”
  • A soldier might express admiration for their superior by saying, “LTCOL is a highly respected position.”

18. LTADM

This slang term is used to refer to a Lieutenant, specifically a Lieutenant who has been promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Admiral. It is often used in naval contexts.

  • For example, in a naval conversation, someone might say, “LTADM Johnson oversees the fleet.”
  • In a discussion about naval ranks, one might mention, “A Lieutenant can rise to the rank of LTADM.”
  • A sailor might express loyalty to their superior by saying, “LTADM is the highest rank I’ve ever served under.”

19. LTMAJ

This slang term is used to refer to a Lieutenant, specifically a Lieutenant who has been promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Major. It is often used in military contexts.

  • For instance, in a military discussion, someone might say, “LTMAJ Thompson is in charge of training.”
  • In a conversation about military hierarchy, one might explain, “A Lieutenant can advance to the rank of LTMAJ.”
  • A soldier might express confidence in their superior by saying, “LTMAJ always knows how to lead us.”

20. LTSGT

This slang term is used to refer to a Lieutenant, specifically a Lieutenant who has been promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Sergeant. It is often used in military contexts.

  • For example, in a military conversation, someone might say, “LTSGT Davis is responsible for discipline.”
  • In a discussion about military hierarchy, one might mention, “A Lieutenant can be promoted to LTSGT.”
  • A soldier might express appreciation for their superior by saying, “LTSGT always keeps us in line.”

21. LTCDT

This term refers to a cadet who holds the rank of lieutenant. It is often used in military or law enforcement contexts.

  • For example, “LTCDT Johnson is the top-ranking cadet in his class.”
  • In a discussion about officer training, someone might ask, “What are the requirements to become an LTCDT?”
  • A cadet might mention, “I hope to be promoted to LTCDT after completing my training.”

22. LTJNR

This term is used to refer to a junior lieutenant, typically in military or law enforcement settings. It indicates a lower rank than a regular lieutenant.

  • For instance, “LTJNR Smith is responsible for leading a small unit.”
  • In a conversation about military ranks, someone might ask, “What’s the difference between a lieutenant and an LTJNR?”
  • A junior officer might say, “I’m proud to serve as an LTJNR in the army.”

23. Louie

This is a nickname for a lieutenant, often used in informal or casual settings.

  • For example, “Hey Louie, can you help me with this task?”
  • In a military-themed movie, a character might say, “Lieutenant Johnson, or as we call him, Louie, is a great leader.”
  • A soldier might mention, “Louie is a friendly and approachable officer.”

24. Butterbar

This term is used to describe a newly commissioned or inexperienced lieutenant. It refers to the single gold bar insignia worn by lieutenants.

  • For instance, “Watch out for the butterbar, he’s still learning the ropes.”
  • In a conversation about military ranks, someone might ask, “Why do they call new lieutenants butterbars?”
  • A seasoned officer might say, “I remember when I was a butterbar, just starting my career.”

25. LT Colonel

This term refers to the rank of lieutenant colonel, which is above the rank of lieutenant. It is often used in military or law enforcement contexts.

  • For example, “LT Colonel Davis is in charge of the battalion.”
  • In a discussion about military promotions, someone might ask, “How long does it take to become an LT Colonel?”
  • A lieutenant colonel might mention, “I’ve served as an LT Colonel for over five years now.”

26. LT Commander

A rank in the military, typically in the Navy, that is above a Lieutenant and below a Commander. The term “LT Commander” is a shortened version of “Lieutenant Commander”.

  • For example, “LT Commander Smith is in charge of the ship’s navigation.”
  • In a discussion about military ranks, someone might ask, “What is the difference between a Lieutenant and a LT Commander?”
  • A person might refer to a LT Commander as “LT CMDR” for short.
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27. First Louie

A rank in the military, typically in the Army or Marine Corps, that is above a Second Lieutenant and below a Captain. “First Louie” is a slang term for “First Lieutenant”.

  • For instance, “First Louie Johnson is leading the platoon.”
  • In a conversation about military promotions, someone might say, “It’s a big step from Second Lieutenant to First Louie.”
  • A soldier might mention, “Being a First Louie comes with more responsibility than being a Second Louie.”

28. Second Louie

A rank in the military, typically in the Army or Marine Corps, that is below a First Lieutenant. “Second Louie” is a slang term for “Second Lieutenant”.

  • For example, “Second Louie Smith just graduated from officer training.”
  • In a discussion about military ranks, someone might ask, “What is the difference between a Second Lieutenant and a First Lieutenant?”
  • A soldier might say, “I’m hoping to get promoted from Second Louie to First Louie soon.”

29. First Lieutenant

A rank in the military, typically in the Army or Marine Corps, that is above a Second Lieutenant and below a Captain. The term “First Lieutenant” is the official title for this rank.

  • For instance, “First Lieutenant Johnson is leading the platoon.”
  • In a conversation about military promotions, someone might say, “It’s a big step from Second Lieutenant to First Lieutenant.”
  • A soldier might mention, “Being a First Lieutenant comes with more responsibility than being a Second Lieutenant.”

30. Second Lieutenant

A rank in the military, typically in the Army or Marine Corps, that is below a First Lieutenant. The term “Second Lieutenant” is the official title for this rank.

  • For example, “Second Lieutenant Smith just graduated from officer training.”
  • In a discussion about military ranks, someone might ask, “What is the difference between a Second Lieutenant and a First Lieutenant?”
  • A soldier might say, “I’m hoping to get promoted from Second Lieutenant to First Lieutenant soon.”

31. LT CMDR

A rank in the military, specifically in the Navy and Coast Guard, above Lieutenant and below Commander. The abbreviation “LT CMDR” stands for Lieutenant Commander.

  • For example, “LT CMDR Johnson led the naval operation with precision.”
  • In a conversation about military promotions, one might say, “After serving as Lieutenant for several years, he was promoted to LT CMDR.”
  • A military enthusiast might explain, “Lieutenant Commanders often hold important leadership positions on ships and in specialized units.”

32. LT GEN

A high-ranking military officer rank, typically in the Army and Marine Corps, above Major General and below General. The abbreviation “LT GEN” stands for Lieutenant General.

  • For instance, “LT GEN Smith is responsible for overseeing multiple divisions in the Army.”
  • In a discussion about military strategy, one might mention, “LT GEN Jones is known for his innovative tactics.”
  • A military historian might explain, “Lieutenant Generals often play a crucial role in planning and executing large-scale military operations.”