Top 43 Slang For Liquor – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to indulging in our favorite alcoholic beverages, sometimes we like to spice things up with a bit of slang. From timeless classics to trendy new terms, we’ve got you covered with our list of the top slang for liquor. Whether you’re a seasoned drinker or just looking to impress your friends at the next party, this listicle will have you speaking the language of the spirits in no time. So grab a glass, sit back, and get ready to raise the bar with our comprehensive guide to the world of liquor slang. Cheers!

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1. Booze

This term is a general slang word for any type of alcoholic beverage. It is commonly used to refer to any type of liquor or alcoholic drink.

  • For example, “Let’s go grab some booze at the bar.”
  • Someone might ask, “What’s your favorite type of booze?”
  • A person might say, “I need a drink. I’m craving some good old-fashioned booze.”

2. Hooch

Hooch is a slang term for homemade or illegally produced alcohol, often referring to moonshine specifically. Moonshine is high-proof distilled spirits that are typically produced in small quantities and without government regulation.

  • For instance, “He makes his own hooch in his backyard.”
  • In a discussion about prohibition, someone might mention, “During the Prohibition era, people turned to hooch as a way to get their fix.”
  • A person might say, “I tried some homemade hooch once, and it was so strong.”

3. Sauce

Sauce is a slang term used to refer to any type of alcoholic beverage. It is often used in a casual or humorous context.

  • For example, “I had a few too many sauces last night and woke up with a headache.”
  • Someone might say, “Let’s go out and get some sauce tonight!”
  • A person discussing a party might ask, “Is there going to be plenty of sauce at the event?”

4. Firewater

Firewater is a slang term for whiskey, particularly strong or potent whiskey. It is often used in a playful or exaggerated manner to describe the effects of drinking whiskey.

  • For instance, “He took a swig of firewater and instantly felt the burn.”
  • In a discussion about different types of whiskey, someone might say, “I prefer a smooth bourbon over firewater.”
  • A person might joke, “Careful with that firewater, it’s known to make people do crazy things!”

5. Hard stuff

Hard stuff is a slang term used to refer to strong or high-proof alcoholic beverages. It is often used to distinguish these types of drinks from lighter or less potent options.

  • For example, “I need a shot of the hard stuff to forget about my day.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you prefer beer or the hard stuff?”
  • A person might say, “I can handle a few beers, but the hard stuff always gets me.”

6. Moonshine

Moonshine refers to illicitly distilled or homemade alcohol, typically high in alcohol content. It is often made in small batches and lacks regulation or quality control. Moonshine is known for its strong and potent taste.

  • For example, “He brought a jar of moonshine to the party, and it was so strong it knocked everyone off their feet.”
  • In a conversation about bootleg alcohol, someone might say, “Moonshine was a popular choice during Prohibition.”
  • A person reminiscing about their hometown might mention, “Back in the day, my grandpa used to make his own moonshine in the backyard.”

7. Liquid courage

Liquid courage is a slang term used to describe alcohol, particularly when consumed to overcome shyness or boost confidence in social situations. It implies that alcohol can help someone feel more bold or outgoing.

  • For instance, “I needed a shot of liquid courage before getting on stage to perform.”
  • In a discussion about first dates, someone might say, “A glass of wine can provide a little liquid courage.”
  • A person jokingly admitting their fear of public speaking might say, “I always need a dose of liquid courage before giving a presentation.”

8. Juice

Juice is a slang term used to refer to any type of alcoholic beverage. It is a casual and general term that can be used to describe various types of liquor.

  • For example, “Let’s grab some juice and celebrate tonight!”
  • In a conversation about party planning, someone might ask, “What kind of juice should we have at the bar?”
  • A person suggesting a night out might say, “I’m in the mood for some juice. Let’s hit the club.”

9. Brewski

Brewski is a slang term used to refer to beer. It is a lighthearted and casual term often used among friends or in a relaxed setting.

  • For instance, “I’m craving a cold brewski after a long day at work.”
  • In a conversation about different types of drinks, someone might say, “I prefer a brewski over a cocktail.”
  • A person inviting their friends to a casual gathering might say, “Come over for some brewskis and BBQ this weekend.”

10. Vino

Vino is a slang term used to refer to wine. It is derived from the Italian word for wine, “vino.” The term is often used in a playful or informal context.

  • For example, “Let’s have a glass of vino with dinner tonight.”
  • In a discussion about different types of alcoholic beverages, someone might say, “I’m more of a beer person, but I enjoy a good glass of vino occasionally.”
  • A person suggesting a wine tasting outing might say, “Let’s go explore some local vineyards and try different vinos.”

11. Whiskey

A type of distilled alcoholic beverage made from fermented grain mash. Whiskey is typically aged in wooden casks, which gives it its distinct flavor and color.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I enjoy sipping on a glass of whiskey after a long day.”
  • In a bar, a customer might ask the bartender, “Can I have a whiskey on the rocks, please?”
  • A whiskey enthusiast might discuss the different types of whiskey, such as bourbon, scotch, or rye.
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12. Tequila

A distilled alcoholic beverage made from the blue agave plant, primarily in the region surrounding the city of Tequila, Mexico. Tequila is known for its distinctive flavor and is often consumed in shots or used as a base for cocktails.

  • For example, someone might say, “Let’s do some tequila shots to celebrate!”
  • In a bar, a customer might order a margarita and ask, “Can I have it made with tequila, please?”
  • A tequila connoisseur might discuss the different types of tequila, such as blanco, reposado, or añejo.

13. Rum

A distilled alcoholic beverage made from sugarcane byproducts, such as molasses or sugarcane juice. Rum is often associated with tropical or Caribbean cultures and is used as a base for many popular cocktails.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I love sipping on a daiquiri made with rum by the beach.”
  • In a bar, a customer might order a piña colada and ask, “Can I have it made with rum, please?”
  • A rum enthusiast might discuss the different types of rum, such as light, dark, or spiced.

14. Gin

A distilled alcoholic beverage made from juniper berries and other botanicals. Gin is known for its herbal and floral flavors and is a key ingredient in classic cocktails such as the martini and the gin and tonic.

  • For example, someone might say, “I enjoy a refreshing gin and tonic on a hot summer day.”
  • In a bar, a customer might order a negroni and ask, “Can I have it made with gin, please?”
  • A gin enthusiast might discuss the different styles of gin, such as London dry gin, Plymouth gin, or Old Tom gin.

15. Vodka

A distilled alcoholic beverage made from fermented grains or potatoes. Vodka is known for its neutral flavor and is often used as a base for cocktails or consumed neat or on the rocks.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I like my vodka martini shaken, not stirred.”
  • In a bar, a customer might order a screwdriver and ask, “Can I have it made with vodka, please?”
  • A vodka enthusiast might discuss the different brands and flavors of vodka, such as flavored vodkas or premium vodkas.

16. Bourbon

Bourbon is a type of whiskey that is primarily made from corn. It is known for its distinct flavor and is often associated with the American South.

  • For example, a person might say, “I enjoy sipping on a glass of bourbon after a long day.”
  • In a discussion about different types of whiskey, someone might ask, “What’s the difference between bourbon and scotch?”
  • A bartender might recommend, “If you like sweet and smooth flavors, try a bourbon old fashioned.”

17. Scotch

Scotch is a type of whiskey that is made in Scotland. It is known for its smoky and peaty flavor, which comes from the traditional process of drying malted barley over a peat fire.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I prefer drinking scotch neat to fully appreciate its flavors.”
  • In a conversation about whiskey, a person might ask, “Do you prefer bourbon or scotch?”
  • A whiskey connoisseur might recommend, “If you’re new to scotch, try a single malt from the Highlands.”

18. Brandy

Brandy is a spirit that is made by distilling wine or fermented fruit juice. It is typically aged in oak barrels, which gives it a unique flavor and aroma.

  • For example, someone might say, “I love sipping on a glass of brandy by the fireplace.”
  • In a discussion about different types of spirits, a person might ask, “What’s the difference between brandy and whiskey?”
  • A bartender might suggest, “If you like fruity and aromatic flavors, try a brandy sour cocktail.”

19. Sip

To sip means to drink slowly or in small quantities. It is often used to describe the act of enjoying a beverage, such as liquor, by taking small sips.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I like to sip on my whiskey to savor the flavors.”
  • In a conversation about drinking habits, a person might ask, “Do you sip or gulp your drinks?”
  • A bartender might recommend, “If you want to fully appreciate the flavors of the cocktail, take small sips.”

20. Swig

To swig means to drink quickly and in large quantities. It is often used to describe the act of consuming a beverage, such as liquor, in one swift motion.

  • For example, someone might say, “After a long day, I like to swig a shot of tequila to unwind.”
  • In a discussion about drinking preferences, a person might ask, “Do you prefer to sip or swig your drinks?”
  • A partygoer might exclaim, “Let’s swig some vodka shots and get the party started!”

21. Nip

A “nip” refers to a small amount of liquor, typically consumed quickly. It can also refer to a small bottle of alcohol, usually containing about 50 milliliters.

  • For example, “I’ll just have a nip of whiskey to warm up.”
  • In a conversation about drinking habits, someone might say, “I like to have a nip of vodka before bed.”
  • A bartender might ask, “Would you like a nip of tequila to go with your beer?”

22. Chaser

A “chaser” is a beverage consumed after taking a shot of liquor, usually to mitigate the strong taste or burn of the alcohol. It is typically a non-alcoholic drink, such as water, soda, or juice.

  • For instance, “After taking a shot of tequila, I always need a chaser to wash it down.”
  • In a discussion about drinking games, someone might suggest, “Take a shot of vodka and then chase it with a glass of cranberry juice.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer to have a chaser ready before I take a shot of whiskey.”

23. Rotgut

“Rotgut” is a slang term used to describe low-quality or cheap liquor. It often refers to spirits that are harsh, poorly distilled, or of inferior taste and quality.

  • For example, “I wouldn’t recommend drinking that rotgut whiskey.”
  • In a conversation about preferences, someone might say, “I’d rather pay more for a good bourbon than drink rotgut.”
  • A person might comment, “The bar down the street serves rotgut vodka. I wouldn’t go there for a decent drink.”

24. Swill

“Swill” is a slang term used to describe poor-quality or unpleasant-tasting liquor. It refers to alcohol that is considered cheap, low-grade, or of inferior taste and quality.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe they serve that swill as their house wine.”
  • In a discussion about favorite drinks, someone might say, “I’d rather have a craft beer than drink that swill.”
  • A person might comment, “The bar down the street has a reputation for serving swill. I wouldn’t recommend it.”

25. Tipple

To “tipple” means to drink alcohol, especially in small quantities or casually. It often refers to enjoying alcoholic beverages without excessive consumption.

  • For example, “I like to tipple on a glass of wine in the evenings.”
  • In a conversation about socializing, someone might say, “Let’s meet up for a tipple at the local pub.”
  • A person might comment, “I enjoy tipping a few beers with friends on the weekends.”

26. Giggle water

Giggle water is a playful term for alcoholic beverages, often used to describe drinks that are fun and enjoyable. The term originated in the 1920s during the Prohibition era when alcohol was illegal in the United States.

  • For example, a person might say, “Let’s go out for some giggle water tonight!”
  • In a conversation about partying, someone might ask, “Do you have any giggle water for the night?”
  • A cocktail enthusiast might share a recipe for a giggle water cocktail, saying, “This drink is sure to make you laugh!”

27. Nectar of the gods

Nectar of the gods refers to an alcoholic beverage that is exceptionally delicious and enjoyable. The term is often used to describe drinks that are highly regarded and considered to be of superior quality.

  • For instance, a person might say, “This fine wine is truly the nectar of the gods.”
  • In a discussion about craft beers, someone might exclaim, “I’ve found the nectar of the gods in this IPA!”
  • A cocktail connoisseur might describe a well-made martini as the nectar of the gods.
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28. Sipper

Sipper is a term used to describe someone who drinks alcohol slowly and takes small sips to savor the flavors. It can also refer to a drink that is meant to be sipped slowly rather than consumed quickly.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m not a chugger, I’m a sipper. I like to enjoy my drink.”
  • In a discussion about whiskey, someone might say, “This is a great sipper, perfect for savoring.”
  • A bartender might recommend a sipper cocktail to a customer who prefers a slower drinking experience.

29. Brown bottle flu

Brown bottle flu is a colloquial term for a hangover, specifically one that is caused by drinking alcohol from a brown bottle, such as a beer bottle. The term is often used humorously to describe the unpleasant symptoms that can occur after a night of heavy drinking.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I had a few too many last night and now I’ve got a case of the brown bottle flu.”
  • In a conversation about partying, someone might ask, “Did you wake up with the brown bottle flu this morning?”
  • A person complaining about their hangover might say, “I’ve got a serious case of the brown bottle flu today.”

30. Liquid gold

Liquid gold is a term used to describe a high-quality and valuable alcoholic beverage. The term is often used to emphasize the excellence and desirability of a particular drink.

  • For example, a person might say, “This vintage wine is liquid gold.”
  • In a discussion about rare and expensive liquors, someone might say, “I’ve got a bottle of liquid gold in my collection.”
  • A bartender might describe a top-shelf whiskey as liquid gold, saying, “It’s worth every penny.”

31. Plonk

This term is often used to describe inexpensive or low-quality wine. It can also refer to any alcoholic beverage that is considered of poor quality.

  • For example, “I can’t believe they’re serving plonk at this fancy restaurant.”
  • A wine connoisseur might comment, “I wouldn’t waste my time on that plonk.”
  • Someone might say, “I’ll bring a bottle of plonk to the party since it’s just for mixing cocktails.”

32. Saucebox

This slang term is used to describe someone who frequently drinks alcohol, especially to excess. It can also refer to someone who is intoxicated or under the influence of alcohol.

  • For instance, “He’s such a saucebox, he’s always drunk.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “You’re turning into quite the saucebox lately.”
  • Someone might comment, “I can’t believe she showed up to work as a saucebox.”

33. Snort

This term is used to refer to an alcoholic beverage, particularly hard liquor. It can also be used as a verb to describe the act of consuming alcohol.

  • For example, “Let’s go grab a snort at the bar.”
  • A person might say, “I need a snort to relax after a long day.”
  • Someone might ask, “Want to come over for a snort and watch a movie?”

34. Tonic

In the context of slang for liquor, “tonic” refers to a mixed drink that includes alcohol. It can also refer to any alcoholic beverage in general.

  • For instance, “I’ll have a gin and tonic, please.”
  • A bartender might ask, “What kind of tonic would you like in your cocktail?”
  • Someone might say, “I need a tonic to take the edge off.”

35. Grog

This term originated from British naval slang and refers to any alcoholic beverage, particularly rum. It can also be used to describe a strong or heavily alcoholic drink.

  • For example, “They served grog at the pirate-themed party.”
  • A sailor might say, “I could use a mug of grog after a long day at sea.”
  • Someone might comment, “That cocktail is a real grog, be careful.”

36. Nectar

Nectar is a term used to describe a sweet liquid, often referring to a delicious or high-quality alcoholic beverage. It is often used to emphasize the enjoyable taste of a particular drink.

  • For example, “This cocktail is pure nectar, it’s so smooth and flavorful.”
  • When describing a tasty wine, someone might say, “This bottle is like nectar from the gods.”
  • In a review of a craft beer, a drinker might comment, “The brewery’s IPA is a hoppy nectar that’s bursting with flavor.”

37. Brew

Brew is a slang term for beer, specifically referring to the process of brewing it. It is commonly used to describe a cold, refreshing alcoholic beverage made from fermented grains.

  • For instance, “Let’s grab a brew at the local pub.”
  • When discussing different types of beer, someone might say, “I prefer a hoppy brew with a strong flavor.”
  • In a conversation about craft breweries, a beer enthusiast might mention, “I love trying new brews and supporting local businesses.”

38. Libation

Libation is a term used to describe an alcoholic drink that is offered as a ritual offering, often in religious or ceremonial contexts. It can also refer to any beverage, especially an alcoholic one, that is consumed in celebration or as a form of tribute.

  • For example, “The priest poured a libation as part of the ceremony.”
  • During a toast at a wedding, someone might say, “Let’s raise our glasses in libation to the happy couple.”
  • When describing a festive gathering, a partygoer might exclaim, “There was music, dancing, and plenty of libations!”

39. Zythum

Zythum is an ancient Egyptian term for beer. It specifically refers to a type of beer that was brewed in ancient Egypt using a unique fermentation process. The term is rarely used today but can be encountered in historical or archaeological contexts.

  • For instance, “The ancient Egyptians enjoyed zythum as a staple beverage.”
  • In a discussion about ancient civilizations, a historian might mention, “Zythum played a significant role in Egyptian culture.”
  • When studying ancient brewing techniques, an archaeologist might say, “We’ve discovered evidence of zythum production in this ancient brewery.”

40. Hard liquor

Hard liquor is a term used to describe strong alcoholic beverages, typically those with a high alcohol content. It is often contrasted with beer and wine, which have lower alcohol percentages.

  • For example, “I prefer hard liquor over beer because it gives me a stronger buzz.”
  • When ordering a drink at a bar, someone might say, “I’ll have a glass of hard liquor, please.”
  • In a discussion about cocktail recipes, a mixologist might recommend, “Use hard liquor if you want a more potent drink.”

41. Sip of the devil

This term refers to a strong alcoholic beverage, often with a high alcohol content. It implies that consuming too much of it can have negative consequences.

  • For example, at a party, someone might say, “I can’t handle another sip of the devil.”
  • A person discussing their favorite drinks might say, “I enjoy a good sip of the devil every now and then.”
  • In a cautionary conversation about alcohol, someone might warn, “Be careful with the sip of the devil, it can sneak up on you.”

42. Tottie

This term is used to refer to a small amount of liquor, typically in the context of a shot or a small glass.

  • For instance, at a bar, someone might order, “Give me a tottie of whiskey.”
  • A person discussing their drinking habits might say, “I like to have a tottie of rum before bed.”
  • In a conversation about alcoholic beverages, someone might ask, “Do you prefer a tottie or a full-sized drink?”

43. Zobo

This term is used to describe inexpensive or low-quality wine.

  • For example, at a party, someone might say, “I brought a bottle of zobo.”
  • A person discussing their preferences might say, “I don’t mind drinking zobo, as long as it gets the job done.”
  • In a conversation about wine, someone might ask, “Have you tried any zobo lately?”