Top 39 Slang For Look – Meaning & Usage

In a world where first impressions matter, having the right words to describe someone’s appearance can make all the difference. That’s why we’ve put together a list of the top slang for “look” that will help you stay in the loop and up your style game. From head to toe, we’ve got you covered with the trendiest expressions that will have you slaying your looks in no time. Don’t miss out on this must-read article if you want to stay ahead of the fashion pack and impress your friends with your word game.

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1. Peep

To peep means to take a quick or secretive look at something or someone, often to satisfy curiosity or to observe without being noticed.

  • For example, “I couldn’t help but peep through the window to see what was going on.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll just peep at the menu before deciding what to order.”
  • In a conversation about celebrities, someone might ask, “Did you peep the latest gossip about Taylor Swift?”

2. Check out

To check out means to take a look at or admire someone or something, often in a casual or appreciative manner.

  • For instance, “Check out that new car in the parking lot!”
  • A person might say, “I need to check out that new restaurant everyone’s been talking about.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might comment, “Check out her outfit, it’s so stylish!”

3. Scope

To scope means to examine or survey a situation or location, often to gather information or assess the surroundings.

  • For example, “I need to scope out the competition before the game.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s scope the area before deciding where to set up camp.”
  • In a conversation about job opportunities, someone might suggest, “You should scope out the job market before making a decision.”

4. Glance

To glance means to take a quick or brief look at something or someone, often without focusing or giving full attention.

  • For instance, “I just glanced at the newspaper headlines.”
  • A person might say, “I glanced at my watch and realized I was running late.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might comment, “I couldn’t help but glance at that beautiful painting.”

5. Glimpse

To glimpse means to catch a brief or fleeting look of something or someone, often when it is difficult to see or when it happens unexpectedly.

  • For example, “I glimpsed a shooting star in the night sky.”
  • A person might say, “I caught a glimpse of her walking down the street.”
  • In a conversation about wildlife, someone might share, “I was lucky enough to glimpse a rare bird during my hike.”

6. Eyeball

To look at someone or something with a focused and intense gaze. “Eyeball” is often used to describe a prolonged or intense look.

  • For example, a person might say, “I couldn’t help but eyeball that new car in the parking lot.”
  • In a crowded room, someone might comment, “He was eyeballing everyone who walked in.”
  • A friend might ask, “Why are you eyeballing my plate? Do you want some of my food?”

7. Stare

To look at someone or something for an extended period of time without averting one’s gaze. “Stare” typically implies a certain intensity or focus in the act of looking.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He just sat there and stared at me without saying a word.”
  • In a suspenseful movie scene, a character might stare at something in fear or anticipation.
  • If someone catches you staring, you might apologize and say, “Sorry, I was lost in thought.”

8. Gawk

To stare openly and rudely at someone or something, often with one’s mouth open in surprise or awe. “Gawk” suggests a sense of astonishment or curiosity in the act of looking.

  • For example, a person might say, “I couldn’t help but gawk at the extravagant display in the store window.”
  • If someone is dressed in a unique or unusual way, you might hear, “People couldn’t stop gawking at her outfit.”
  • A friend might tease you and say, “Stop gawking at that cute puppy and pet it already!”

9. Ogle

To look at someone with strong desire or sexual interest, often in an obvious and inappropriate manner. “Ogle” implies a certain objectification or lewdness in the act of looking.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He couldn’t help but ogle the attractive person across the room.”
  • In a movie scene, a character might ogle someone walking by in a revealing outfit.
  • If someone catches you ogling, you might feel embarrassed and quickly look away.
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10. Peek

To take a quick and discreet look at someone or something, often by briefly opening or lifting a cover or barrier. “Peek” suggests a sense of curiosity or sneakiness in the act of looking.

  • For example, a person might say, “I couldn’t resist taking a peek at my birthday present before the party.”
  • In a game of hide-and-seek, a child might peek around a corner to see if anyone is coming.
  • If you catch someone peeking at your phone screen, you might playfully say, “Trying to see what I’m texting, huh?”

11. Spy

To spy means to observe someone or something secretly, usually without their knowledge or consent. It can also refer to gathering information or keeping a close watch on someone or something.

  • For example, a detective might say, “I need to spy on the suspect to gather evidence.”
  • In a playful context, someone might say, “I spy with my little eye something green!”
  • A person discussing privacy might caution, “Be careful, your neighbor might be spying on you.”

12. Scan

To scan means to quickly look over or examine something. It involves a quick visual inspection to gather information or get an overview of a situation.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “Scan the text and look for the main idea.”
  • When searching for a specific word in a document, someone might say, “Scan the page for the keyword.”
  • In a crowded room, a person might scan the crowd to find their friend.

13. Size up

To size up means to assess or evaluate someone or something, often by looking them up and down to form an opinion or estimate their characteristics or abilities.

  • For example, a coach might say, “Size up the competition and see where we stand.”
  • When meeting someone new, a person might try to size them up to determine their personality.
  • In a job interview, an interviewer might size up the candidate’s qualifications and suitability for the role.

14. Cast an eye

To cast an eye means to take a quick look at something or someone. It implies a brief and casual observation.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “Cast an eye on the kids and make sure they’re behaving.”
  • When browsing through a store, someone might cast an eye on the display to see if anything catches their attention.
  • In a meeting, a participant might cast an eye at their watch to check the time.

15. Lay eyes on

To lay eyes on means to see or look at something or someone, often for the first time or after a long absence.

  • For example, a person might say, “I can’t wait to lay my eyes on the beautiful sunset.”
  • When meeting a celebrity, someone might say, “I finally laid eyes on my favorite actor!”
  • After being away for a while, a person might say, “It feels good to lay eyes on my hometown again.”

16. Take a gander

This phrase is a colloquial way to ask someone to look at something or someone. It is often used in a casual or playful manner.

  • For example, “Take a gander at that new car. It’s a beauty!”
  • A person might say, “I took a gander at the menu before deciding what to order.”
  • Another might ask, “Mind taking a gander at my outfit? Do you think it looks good?”

17. Catch sight of

This phrase means to suddenly or unexpectedly see something or someone. It implies that the person was not actively searching for the thing they saw.

  • For instance, “I caught sight of a rare bird while hiking in the forest.”
  • A person might say, “I caught sight of my favorite celebrity at the airport.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I caught sight of the sunset just in time. It was breathtaking!”

18. Behold

“Behold” is an exclamation used to draw attention to something impressive or remarkable. It is often used in a dramatic or poetic manner.

  • For example, “Behold the stunning view from the mountaintop!”
  • A person might say, “Behold the power of modern technology!” before demonstrating a new gadget.
  • Another might use the word humorously, “Behold, my masterpiece!” when presenting a homemade dish.

19. View

This word is a more formal or neutral term for looking at something or someone. It can be used in various contexts and is often used to describe a visual experience.

  • For instance, “The balcony offers a beautiful view of the ocean.”
  • A person might say, “I would love to view the art exhibition at the museum.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you want to view the latest episode of our favorite show together?”

20. Witness

This word implies actively seeing or experiencing something significant or noteworthy. It can be used in both literal and figurative contexts.

  • For example, “I witnessed a car accident on my way to work.”
  • A person might say, “I witnessed the birth of my niece. It was a truly special moment.”
  • Another might use the word metaphorically, “I witnessed the rise and fall of that company. It was quite a journey.”

21. Scope out

This phrase means to carefully look at or investigate something or someone. It is often used when trying to gather information or assess a situation.

  • For example, “I’m going to scope out the new restaurant before deciding to eat there.”
  • In a spy movie, a character might say, “I need to scope out the target’s location before making a move.”
  • A person looking for a new car might say, “I’m going to scope out the different dealerships to find the best deal.”

22. Peruse

To peruse means to look at or read something in a thorough and careful manner. It implies taking the time to understand or appreciate the details.

  • For instance, “She sat down to peruse the latest issue of her favorite magazine.”
  • A student might say, “I need to peruse the textbook before the exam to make sure I understand the material.”
  • Someone browsing in a bookstore might say, “I like to peruse the shelves and see what catches my eye.”

23. Catch a glimpse

When you catch a glimpse, it means you see something or someone briefly or for a short moment. It often implies a quick or unexpected sighting.

  • For example, “I caught a glimpse of a shooting star before it disappeared.”
  • A person might say, “I caught a glimpse of my favorite celebrity as they walked by.”
  • Someone might excitedly say, “I caught a glimpse of the beautiful sunset before it disappeared behind the mountains.”

24. Set eyes on

To set eyes on something or someone means to see or look at them for the first time. It often implies a sense of anticipation or excitement.

  • For instance, “When I set eyes on the view from the mountaintop, I was in awe.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t wait to set eyes on the new art exhibit at the museum.”
  • Someone might describe a memorable experience by saying, “The moment I set eyes on the Eiffel Tower was truly magical.”

25. Feast your eyes on

To feast your eyes on something means to look at it with great pleasure or enjoyment. It often implies being captivated or enthralled by what you see.

  • For example, “Feast your eyes on this stunning sunset over the ocean.”
  • A person might say, “You have to feast your eyes on the beautiful architecture in this city.”
  • Someone might describe a delicious meal by saying, “Feast your eyes on this mouthwatering dish.”

26. Have a look-see

This phrase is used to suggest taking a quick look or examining something briefly. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, “Have a look-see at this new gadget I bought.”
  • A friend might say, “Hey, have a look-see at this funny video I found.”
  • In a shop, a salesperson might say, “Feel free to have a look-see around and let me know if you need any assistance.”

27. Give a look

This phrase is used to ask someone to look at something or examine it. It is a more direct and informal way of asking someone to look.

  • For instance, “Give a look at this beautiful sunset.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Give a look at this cute puppy.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you give a look at this picture and tell me what you think?”

28. Take a glance

This phrase is used to suggest taking a brief or cursory look at something. It implies a quick observation rather than a thorough examination.

  • For example, “Take a glance at the menu and see what you want to order.”
  • A teacher might say to a student, “Take a glance at the textbook and find the answer to question 5.”
  • In a museum, a visitor might say, “Let’s take a glance at this exhibit before moving on.”

29. Lay your peepers on

This phrase is used to ask someone to look at something, often with a sense of excitement or anticipation. It implies that the person will be seeing something interesting or impressive.

  • For instance, “Lay your peepers on this amazing view.”
  • A friend might say, “You have to lay your peepers on this hilarious video.”
  • In a store, a salesperson might say, “Come over here and lay your peepers on this new product.”

30. Give a once-over

This phrase is used to suggest taking a quick and cursory look at something or someone. It implies a brief inspection or assessment.

  • For example, “Give the document a once-over before submitting it.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Give your room a once-over and make sure it’s clean.”
  • A colleague might ask, “Can you give this report a once-over and check for any errors?”

31. Cast a glance

To cast a glance means to take a quick look at something or someone. It implies a brief and casual observation.

  • For example, “She cast a glance at her phone to check the time.”
  • In a crowded room, you might say, “He cast a glance around to see if he recognized anyone.”
  • When passing by a store window, you could say, “I cast a glance at the display, but nothing caught my eye.”

32. Have a gander

To have a gander means to take a look or have a glance at something. It is a more informal and colloquial way of expressing the act of looking.

  • For instance, “Let’s have a gander at the new menu and decide what to order.”
  • When someone shows you a photo, you might say, “I’ll have a gander at that picture you’re so excited about.”
  • In a shop, you could ask the salesperson, “Can I have a gander at that dress in the window?”

33. Give an eyeball

To give an eyeball means to take a quick look or glance at something. It implies a casual and brief observation, similar to casting a glance.

  • For example, “He gave an eyeball to the document to see if it was important.”
  • When someone shows you a new gadget, you might say, “I’ll give it an eyeball and see what I think.”
  • In a crowded street, you could say, “I gave an eyeball to the street performer, but didn’t stop to watch.”

34. Take a squiz

To take a squiz means to have a look or glance at something. It is an informal term often used in Australian slang.

  • For instance, “I’ll take a squiz at the map and figure out the directions.”
  • When someone shows you a photo, you might say, “Let me take a squiz at that picture you’re talking about.”
  • In a museum, you could say, “I took a squiz at the painting, but it didn’t really capture my attention.”

35. Eye up

To eye up means to look at someone or something with interest or desire. It implies a more intense and focused observation, often with a specific intention.

  • For example, “He couldn’t help but eye up the delicious dessert on the menu.”
  • When someone walks into a room, you might say, “Everyone started eyeing him up, wondering who he was.”
  • In a clothing store, you could say, “She was eyeing up that beautiful dress, debating whether to try it on.”

36. Peer

This term refers to taking a quick look or glance at something or someone. It often implies a curious or interested observation.

  • For example, “She peered out the window to see who was knocking.”
  • In a crowded room, someone might say, “I’m trying to peer through the crowd to find my friend.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you peer over my shoulder and see if I made any mistakes?”

37. Spot

To spot something means to notice or see it, often when it is not immediately obvious or easy to see.

  • For instance, “She spotted a typo in the document.”
  • A person might say, “I spotted a rare bird in the park today.”
  • In a game of hide-and-seek, someone might exclaim, “I spotted you hiding behind the tree!”

38. Watch

To watch means to observe something or someone closely and attentively.

  • For example, “She watched the sunset from her balcony.”
  • A person might say, “I enjoy watching people walk by and imagining their stories.”
  • In a nature documentary, the narrator might say, “Watch as the lioness stalks her prey.”

39. Study

Studying something means to examine it carefully and in detail, often with the intention of gaining knowledge or understanding.

  • For instance, “He studied the painting, trying to decipher its meaning.”
  • A student might say, “I need to study for my upcoming exam.”
  • In a scientific experiment, a researcher might study the effects of a new drug.
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