Top 40 Slang For Loud – Meaning & Usage

Loud, whether it’s in the form of music, laughter, or conversation, is a vibrant expression of energy and excitement. From the boisterous to the thunderous, we’ve rounded up the top slang words and phrases that capture the essence of being loud. So, get ready to turn up the volume and explore this listicle that celebrates the power and intensity of all things loud!

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1. Bullhorn

A bullhorn is a portable loudspeaker that amplifies sound, allowing the user to project their voice over a long distance. It is often used by law enforcement, event organizers, or protest leaders to address a large crowd.

  • For example, during a protest, a leader might shout into a bullhorn, “We demand justice now!”
  • In a sports event, a coach might use a bullhorn to give instructions to their team.
  • A person attending a rally might comment, “The speaker’s voice sounded so powerful through the bullhorn.”

2. Babblemouth

A babblemouth is someone who talks excessively or without much purpose, often loudly. This term is used to describe someone who can’t seem to stop talking, even when it may be annoying or disruptive.

  • For instance, in a classroom, a teacher might say, “Please be quiet, babblemouth, so we can continue with the lesson.”
  • A friend might jokingly tease, “You’re such a babblemouth, you never let anyone else get a word in.”
  • Someone might complain about a coworker, saying, “I can’t concentrate with that babblemouth constantly talking.”

3. Blabbermouth

A blabbermouth is someone who can’t keep a secret and tends to share information or gossip without discretion. This term is often used to describe someone who talks loudly and impulsively, revealing things they shouldn’t.

  • For example, a person might warn a friend, “Don’t tell Sarah anything important, she’s a blabbermouth.”
  • In a group setting, someone might say, “Keep it to yourself, blabbermouth, we don’t need everyone knowing.”
  • A frustrated coworker might comment, “I can’t trust that blabbermouth with any confidential information.”

4. Bag of wind

A bag of wind is a derogatory term used to describe someone who talks a lot but says very little of substance. It implies that the person’s words are empty and lack meaning or value.

  • For instance, during a meeting, someone might sarcastically say, “Thanks for your input, bag of wind.”
  • A person might describe a politician, saying, “All they do is make promises, but they’re just a bag of wind.”
  • Someone frustrated with a long-winded speaker might mutter, “Get to the point already, you bag of wind.”

5. Windbag

A windbag is someone who talks excessively and often self-importantly, without considering the interests or needs of others. This term suggests that the person’s words are full of hot air and lack substance.

  • For example, during a team meeting, a coworker might whisper, “Here comes the windbag, get ready for a long monologue.”
  • A person might complain about a lecturer, saying, “I couldn’t stay awake during their class, they’re such a windbag.”
  • Someone might comment on a politician’s speech, “All they do is talk, but they’re just a windbag.”

6. Chatterbox

A “chatterbox” is someone who talks a lot or is constantly chattering. It is often used to describe someone who speaks without thinking or who can’t stop talking.

  • For example, “She’s such a chatterbox, she never stops talking.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “Let’s hear from someone other than the chatterbox.”
  • A parent might say, “My child is a chatterbox, they never run out of things to say.”

7. Gabber

A “gabber” is someone who talks quickly or excessively. It is often used to describe someone who talks a lot but may not have much substance to say.

  • For instance, “He’s such a gabber, he never pauses for breath.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Stop gabbing and let me speak.”
  • A friend might tease, “You’re such a gabber, you could talk for hours without stopping.”

8. Blabber

A “blabber” is someone who talks too much, especially about things that should be kept private. It is often used to describe someone who can’t keep a secret or who shares confidential information.

  • For example, “She’s such a blabber, I can’t trust her with anything.”
  • In a situation where someone reveals a secret, someone might say, “Don’t be a blabber, keep it to yourself.”
  • A friend might warn, “Watch what you say around him, he’s a blabber.”

9. Big mouth

A “big mouth” is someone who talks a lot, often without thinking or without considering the consequences. It is often used to describe someone who can’t keep a secret or who shares personal information without permission.

  • For instance, “Don’t tell her anything, she’s a big mouth.”
  • In a situation where someone accidentally reveals something, someone might say, “Nice job, big mouth.”
  • A parent might scold, “Keep your big mouth shut and listen for once.”

10. Chatter

“Chatter” refers to casual and often meaningless or unimportant conversation. It is often used to describe the sound of people talking in the background.

  • For example, “I could hear the chatter of people at the party.”
  • In a noisy environment, someone might say, “I can’t hear anything over all the chatter.”
  • A person might comment, “The chatter in the office is distracting, I can’t concentrate.”

11. Gab

To “gab” means to talk excessively or loudly. It is often used to describe someone who talks a lot or can’t stop talking.

  • For example, “She was gabbing on the phone for hours.”
  • A person might say, “Stop gabbing and let me concentrate.”
  • Another might comment, “He’s always gabbing about his weekend adventures.”

12. Yammer

To “yammer” means to talk loudly and persistently, often in a complaining or annoying manner.

  • For instance, “The kids were yammering in the backseat the whole trip.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t concentrate with all the yammering in the office.”
  • Another might comment, “He yammers on and on about his problems.”

13. Tatava yapmak

In Turkish slang, “tatava yapmak” means to make a lot of noise or create a commotion.

  • For example, “The party next door was tatava yapmak all night.”
  • A person might say, “Why are you tatava yapmak in the middle of the night?”
  • Another might comment, “The construction workers were tatava yapmak all day long.”

14. Yak

To “yak” means to yell or shout loudly.

  • For instance, “They were yaking at each other during the argument.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t yak at me, I’m right here.”
  • Another might comment, “The coach was yaking instructions to the team.”

15. Anirmak

In Turkish slang, “anirmak” means to make a loud noise or bang.

  • For example, “The door slammed shut and anirmed throughout the house.”
  • A person might say, “Stop anirming, you’re scaring the dog.”
  • Another might comment, “The thunderstorm anirmed all night long.”

16. Blaring

Blaring refers to a sound that is extremely loud and can be heard from a distance. It is often used to describe music or other noises that are overpowering.

  • For example, “The music at the concert was blaring so loud that I could feel the vibrations.”
  • A person might complain, “The car next to me had their blaring music on full volume.”
  • Someone might say, “I could hear the blaring sirens from several blocks away.”

17. Ear-splitting

Ear-splitting is a term used to describe a sound that is so loud that it feels as if it could cause physical pain or damage to the ears. It implies a sound that is piercing and overwhelming.

  • For instance, “The fireworks were so ear-splitting that I had to cover my ears.”
  • A person might exclaim, “The alarm in the building was ear-splitting and gave me a headache.”
  • Someone might say, “The thunder during the storm was ear-splitting and shook the entire house.”

18. Thunderous

Thunderous describes a sound that is loud and powerful, similar to the sound of thunder during a storm. It conveys a sense of strength and intensity.

  • For example, “The applause for the performer was thunderous and echoed throughout the theater.”
  • A person might say, “The explosion was thunderous and could be heard for miles.”
  • Someone might comment, “The roar of the crowd at the sports game was thunderous and energizing.”

19. Deafening

Deafening refers to a sound that is so loud that it temporarily or permanently impairs one’s ability to hear. It suggests a level of volume that is overwhelming and can drown out other sounds.

  • For instance, “The concert was so deafening that I couldn’t hear anything for hours afterward.”
  • A person might complain, “The construction noise outside my window is deafening.”
  • Someone might say, “The gunshot was deafening and startled everyone in the vicinity.”

20. Roaring

Roaring describes a sound that is loud, deep, and powerful, similar to the roar of a lion. It conveys a sense of strength and intensity.

  • For example, “The waves crashing against the shore were roaring and created a soothing sound.”
  • A person might say, “The engine of the sports car was roaring as it accelerated.”
  • Someone might comment, “The crowd at the concert was roaring with excitement and anticipation.”

21. Booming

Booming refers to a loud and deep sound that carries a lot of power or intensity.

  • For example, “The booming thunder shook the entire house.”
  • A person might say, “The booming music at the concert was incredible.”
  • Another might describe a voice as, “He had a booming laugh that filled the room.”

22. Piercing

Piercing describes a sound that is very sharp and high-pitched, often causing discomfort or pain.

  • For instance, “The piercing scream of the fire alarm startled everyone.”
  • A person might say, “Her piercing voice could be heard from across the room.”
  • Another might describe a dog’s bark as, “The piercing bark echoed through the neighborhood.”

23. Racket

A racket refers to a loud and chaotic noise, often associated with a lot of commotion or disturbance.

  • For example, “The kids were making a racket in the backyard.”
  • A person might say, “The construction site was a constant racket.”
  • Another might describe a party as, “The music was blaring and there was a real racket going on.”

24. Clamorous

Clamorous refers to a sound that is loud, noisy, and filled with a lot of activity or chaos.

  • For instance, “The clamorous crowd cheered and shouted in excitement.”
  • A person might say, “The clamorous argument could be heard from down the street.”
  • Another might describe a busy marketplace as, “The clamorous sounds of vendors and customers filled the air.”

25. Noisy

Noisy simply means a sound that is loud and disruptive, often causing a disturbance or annoyance.

  • For example, “The noisy neighbors kept me up all night with their loud music.”
  • A person might say, “The classroom was always noisy with students talking.”
  • Another might describe a construction site as, “The noisy machinery made it hard to concentrate.”

26. Resounding

This term describes a sound that is loud and echoes or reverberates.

  • For example, “The resounding applause filled the concert hall.”
  • A person might say, “The resounding crash of thunder startled me.”
  • In a review of a concert, a writer might describe the music as “resounding and powerful.”

27. Shouting

Shouting refers to speaking in a loud and forceful manner, usually to convey strong emotions or to be heard over a distance.

  • For instance, “She was shouting at the top of her lungs.”
  • During an argument, someone might say, “Stop shouting at me!”
  • A coach might yell, “Keep shouting those instructions on the field!”

28. Screaming

Screaming refers to making a loud, high-pitched sound, often as a result of fear, excitement, or pain.

  • For example, “The child let out a piercing scream.”
  • Someone might say, “I couldn’t sleep because the neighbors were screaming all night.”
  • In a horror movie, a character might scream in terror.
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29. Blasting

Blasting refers to playing music or sound at an extremely loud volume.

  • For instance, “The party next door was blasting music all night.”
  • A person might say, “I had to ask my neighbor to turn down their blasting stereo.”
  • In a review of a concert, a writer might comment, “The band’s music was blasting and energetic.”

30. Bellowing

Bellowing refers to shouting or yelling in a deep and loud voice, often with a sense of anger or frustration.

  • For example, “The coach was bellowing instructions to the team.”
  • During an argument, someone might say, “Stop bellowing at me!”
  • In a nature documentary, the narrator might describe a lion’s roar as bellowing.

31. Hooting

Hooting refers to a loud and raucous sound, often made by an owl or a person imitating an owl. It can also be used to describe a loud and enthusiastic applause or cheering.

  • For example, “The owl hooted loudly in the night.”
  • During a concert, the crowd started hooting and cheering for the band.
  • A group of friends hooted and celebrated when their team scored a goal.

32. Screeching

Screeching is a high-pitched and piercing sound, often associated with tires screeching on the road or a person screaming loudly.

  • For instance, “The car screeched to a halt.”
  • A frightened person might screech in response to a sudden jump scare in a horror movie.
  • The sound of a screeching violin added tension to the suspenseful scene in the movie.

33. Clanging

Clanging refers to a loud, metallic noise produced by the collision of metal objects or surfaces.

  • For example, “The pots and pans were clanging loudly in the kitchen.”
  • Construction workers were clanging hammers and metal pipes as they built the structure.
  • The sound of clanging chains echoed through the abandoned warehouse.
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34. Howling

Howling is a long, loud, and mournful cry, often associated with wolves or dogs. It can also be used to describe a person singing or shouting loudly.

  • For instance, “The wolf howled at the moon.”
  • During a concert, the crowd started howling along with the singer.
  • A group of friends howled with laughter at a funny joke.

35. Stentorian

Stentorian describes a voice or sound that is extremely loud and powerful, often used to convey authority or dominance.

  • For example, “The teacher’s stentorian voice filled the classroom.”
  • The stentorian roar of the crowd could be heard from miles away during the sports event.
  • The politician delivered a stentorian speech that captivated the audience.

36. Searing

This term describes a sound that is extremely loud and intense, often causing discomfort or pain to the ears. “Searing” can also be used to describe a loud and screeching sound.

  • For example, “The searing sound of the fire alarm made everyone cover their ears.”
  • In a concert review, one might write, “The guitarist’s searing solo was the highlight of the show.”
  • A person describing a loud explosion might say, “The searing sound of the blast echoed throughout the neighborhood.”

37. Boisterous

This word describes a loud and energetic sound, often associated with a lively or noisy atmosphere. “Boisterous” can also be used to describe a person or a group of people who are loud and exuberant.

  • For instance, “The children’s boisterous laughter filled the playground.”
  • In a party scene, one might say, “The boisterous music and dancing created a festive mood.”
  • A person describing a loud argument might say, “The boisterous shouting match could be heard from across the street.”

38. Clashing

This term describes a sound that is loud and harsh, often resulting from a combination of conflicting or discordant elements. “Clashing” can also be used to describe a loud and jarring sound.

  • For example, “The clashing cymbals created a dramatic effect in the symphony.”
  • In a music review, one might write, “The clashing guitars added an edgy quality to the song.”
  • A person describing a loud collision might say, “The clashing of metal echoed throughout the room.”

39. Resonant

This word describes a sound that is loud and rich, often characterized by a deep and vibrant tone. “Resonant” can also be used to describe a sound that lingers or reverberates in a space.

  • For instance, “The singer’s resonant voice captivated the audience.”
  • In a theater review, one might write, “The resonant sound effects created an immersive experience.”
  • A person describing a loud thunder might say, “The resonant boom shook the windows of the house.”

40. Shrill

This term describes a sound that is loud, high-pitched, and often unpleasant to the ears. “Shrill” can also be used to describe a voice or a sound that is sharp and piercing.

  • For example, “The shrill scream of the whistle signaled the end of the game.”
  • In a critique of a singer, one might write, “The shrill notes in the performance were off-putting.”
  • A person describing a loud alarm might say, “The shrill sound woke up the entire neighborhood.”