Top 43 Slang For Lunch – Meaning & Usage

Looking to spice up your lunchtime conversations? Look no further! We’ve rounded up the hottest slang for lunch that will have you sounding cool and trendy in no time. From “food coma” to “hangry,” this listicle is guaranteed to make your lunch breaks a lot more interesting!

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1. Grub

This term refers to food, especially when it is being consumed casually or in a relaxed setting. It is often used in a lighthearted or informal manner.

  • For example, “Let’s grab some grub before the movie.”
  • A person might say, “I’m starving. Can’t wait to get some delicious grub.”
  • In a restaurant review, someone might write, “The place served up some amazing grub.”

2. Chow

This slang term is derived from the Chinese word “cháo” meaning “food” or “meal.” It is commonly used to refer to a meal or food in a casual or playful manner.

  • For instance, “What’s for chow tonight?”
  • Someone might say, “I’m going to grab some chow before heading out.”
  • In a recipe discussion, a person might ask, “Any recommendations for quick and easy chow?”

3. Nosh

This Yiddish term refers to a light meal or snack. It is often used in a casual or playful way to describe eating or enjoying food.

  • For example, “I’m just going to have a quick nosh before the meeting.”
  • Someone might say, “I love noshing on some chips and salsa.”
  • In a food blog, a person might write, “Here are some delicious nosh ideas for your next party.”

4. Eats

This term is a casual way of referring to food or a meal. It is often used in a laid-back or informal context.

  • For instance, “Let’s go grab some eats at that new burger joint.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in the mood for some Mexican eats.”
  • In a restaurant recommendation, someone might write, “This place has the best eats in town.”

5. Feed

This slang term is used to refer to a meal or food. It can be used in a general or playful manner.

  • For example, “I’m starving. Let’s go get some feed.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to find some feed for my hungry kids.”
  • In a cooking group, a person might ask, “Any ideas for a budget-friendly feed for a large gathering?”

6. Munchies

When someone has the munchies, it means they have a strong craving for food, usually as a result of consuming marijuana.

  • For example, “After smoking a joint, I always get the munchies and raid the fridge.”
  • A person might say, “I have a case of the munchies. Let’s order some pizza.”
  • Someone might post on social media, “Just smoked a bowl and now I have the munchies. Time for some snacks!”

7. Chow down

To chow down means to eat a meal or food quickly and heartily.

  • For instance, “I was so hungry after work that I chowed down on a whole pizza.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s chow down on these burgers before they get cold.”
  • Someone might post a picture of their meal with the caption, “About to chow down on this delicious plate of pasta!”

8. Dig in

Dig in means to start eating with enthusiasm or gusto.

  • For example, “The food looks amazing. Let’s dig in!”
  • A person might say, “I’m starving. Time to dig in!”
  • Someone might post a picture of their meal with the caption, “Can’t wait to dig in and enjoy this feast!”

9. Fill up

To fill up means to eat until one is satisfied or full.

  • For instance, “I’m going to fill up on this buffet of delicious food.”
  • A person might say, “I haven’t eaten all day. I need to fill up on some good food.”
  • Someone might post a picture of their plate with the caption, “Time to fill up on this mouthwatering meal!”

10. Grab a bite

To grab a bite means to eat a small amount of food, typically as a snack or light meal.

  • For example, “I’m just going to grab a bite to eat before the movie starts.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t have much time for lunch, so I’ll just grab a quick bite.”
  • Someone might post a picture of their snack with the caption, “Just grabbed a bite of this delicious sandwich!”

11. Fuel up

This phrase is often used to describe the act of eating to refuel or gain energy. It can refer to having a full meal or simply grabbing a quick snack.

  • For example, “I need to fuel up before my workout.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s fuel up with a big breakfast before our road trip.”
  • Another might suggest, “I’m feeling hungry, let’s fuel up at the nearest restaurant.”

12. Chow time

This phrase is used to indicate that it is time to eat, often in a playful or lighthearted manner.

  • For instance, a parent might say to their child, “Chow time! Dinner is ready.”
  • A group of friends might exclaim, “Chow time! Let’s dig in.”
  • Someone might announce, “It’s chow time, everyone. The buffet is open!”

13. Lunchtime

This term refers to the specific time of day when it is customary to eat lunch. It is often used to indicate the midpoint of the day when people take a break to have a meal.

  • For example, “It’s lunchtime, let’s go grab something to eat.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Is it lunchtime yet? I’m getting hungry.”
  • Someone might suggest, “During lunchtime, we should try that new restaurant.”

14. Munch

This word is commonly used to describe the act of eating or snacking, especially when consuming small or light food items.

  • For instance, “I’m just going to munch on some chips while watching TV.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling peckish, I need something to munch on.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you want to munch on some popcorn during the movie?”

15. Snack attack

This phrase is used to describe a sudden and intense desire or craving for snacks or small food items.

  • For example, “I had a serious snack attack in the middle of the night.”
  • A person might say, “Whenever I’m stressed, I get a snack attack.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I can’t resist the snack aisle at the grocery store. It’s a snack attack waiting to happen!”

16. Tuck in

This phrase is used to describe someone who is eating a meal with great enthusiasm or gusto. It implies that the person is enjoying their food and is fully engaged in the act of eating.

  • For example, “I was so hungry that I couldn’t wait to tuck into my burger.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m going to tuck into this pizza, it looks amazing!”
  • Someone might comment on a delicious meal by saying, “Wow, I really tucked into that steak!”

17. Chow hall

This term is commonly used in military or institutional settings to refer to a large dining facility where meals are served to a large number of people. It is often used in the context of the military to describe the main dining area on a military base or in a barracks.

  • For instance, a soldier might say, “I’ll meet you at the chow hall for breakfast.”
  • A military member might complain about the food by saying, “The chow hall always serves the same thing.”
  • In a discussion about military life, someone might ask, “What’s the best meal you’ve had in a chow hall?”

18. Lunch break

This term refers to a designated period of time during the workday when employees are allowed to take a break and eat their lunch. It is a common phrase used in professional settings to indicate the time allotted for lunch.

  • For example, “I’m going to take my lunch break at 12:30.”
  • A coworker might ask, “What time is your lunch break?”
  • Someone might comment on the length of their lunch break by saying, “I only have a 30-minute lunch break, so I need to eat quickly.”

19. Lunchbox

This term refers to a container, typically made of plastic or metal, that is used to carry a packed lunch. It is commonly used by students or workers who bring their own lunch from home.

  • For instance, “I packed my sandwich in my lunchbox this morning.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Did you remember to bring your lunchbox to school?”
  • Someone might comment on the design of their lunchbox by saying, “I have a cool superhero lunchbox.”

20. Lunchables

Lunchables is a brand of pre-packaged lunch kits that contain various types of food, such as crackers, cheese, and meat. They are popular among children and are often seen as a convenient and easy-to-eat lunch option.

  • For example, “I bought a Lunchables kit for my son’s lunch.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Do you want a Lunchables for lunch today?”
  • Someone might comment on the taste of Lunchables by saying, “I used to love eating Lunchables as a kid.”

21. Lunch money

This term refers to the money that a person brings to school or work specifically to purchase lunch. It can also be used more broadly to refer to any money that is used to buy food.

  • For example, a student might say, “I forgot my lunch money today, can I borrow some from you?”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might mention, “I set aside a specific amount of money each week for lunch money.”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Do you have enough lunch money for the week, or do you need me to give you some more?”

22. Lunch date

This term refers to a social outing where two people meet for lunch. It can be a casual get-together or a planned meeting.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Let’s have a lunch date tomorrow and catch up.”
  • In a discussion about dating, someone might mention, “I prefer lunch dates because they’re less formal than dinner dates.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Are you free for a lunch date next week to discuss the project?”

23. Lunch hour

This term refers to the period of time, typically one hour, that is set aside during the workday for employees to have their lunch break.

  • For example, a worker might say, “I always look forward to my lunch hour because it’s a chance to relax and recharge.”
  • In a conversation about work-life balance, someone might mention, “I make it a priority to take my full lunch hour every day.”
  • A manager might remind their team, “Don’t forget to clock out for your lunch hour.”

24. Lunch bag

This term refers to a bag or container specifically designed for carrying a packed lunch. It is often insulated to keep food at the desired temperature.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “Make sure you pack your lunch in your lunch bag before school.”
  • In a conversation about meal prepping, someone might mention, “I always pack my lunches in individual containers and store them in my lunch bag.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Where did you get that cute lunch bag? I need one for myself.”

25. Lunch tray

This term refers to a tray, typically made of plastic or metal, that is used to carry food in a cafeteria or other dining setting. It usually has separate compartments for different food items.

  • For example, a student might say, “I dropped my lunch tray in the cafeteria and made a big mess.”
  • In a discussion about school lunches, someone might mention, “The lunch trays in our cafeteria are color-coded to help us choose a balanced meal.”
  • A cafeteria worker might ask, “Do you need a lunch tray, or are you just getting a drink?”

26. Lunch wagon

A lunch wagon, also known as a food truck, is a mobile kitchen that sells prepared meals, snacks, or beverages. These trucks often park in busy areas, providing a convenient option for people to grab a quick bite to eat.

  • For example, “Let’s grab lunch from the lunch wagon parked outside the office.”
  • A person might say, “I love trying different dishes from different lunch wagons.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you know any good lunch wagons in this area?”

27. Bites

In the context of slang for lunch, “bites” refers to small portions of food. It can be used to describe appetizers, snacks, or any type of food that is meant to be eaten in small quantities.

  • For instance, “I’m just going to grab a few bites before my meeting.”
  • A person might say, “I love ordering a variety of bites when I go out for lunch.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you have any recommendations for tasty bites in this area?”

28. Sustenance

Sustenance refers to the food or drink that provides nourishment and sustains life. In the context of lunch slang, it can be used to describe a satisfying and filling meal that provides energy and sustains the body.

  • For example, “I need some sustenance after a long morning of work.”
  • A person might say, “A hearty bowl of soup is the perfect sustenance for a cold day.”
  • Another might ask, “What’s your go-to sustenance for a productive workday?”

29. Fare

Fare is a term used to refer to food or a specific type of food. In the context of lunch slang, it can be used to describe the food options available or the dishes served during lunchtime.

  • For instance, “What’s the fare like at this new restaurant?”
  • A person might say, “I’m not a fan of the fare served in the cafeteria.”
  • Another might ask, “What’s your favorite fare for a quick and easy lunch?”

30. Cuisine

Cuisine refers to a specific style of cooking or the food associated with a particular region or culture. In the context of lunch slang, it can be used to describe the type of food or cuisine that someone is in the mood for.

  • For example, “I’m craving Italian cuisine for lunch today.”
  • A person might say, “I love exploring different cuisines during my lunch breaks.”
  • Another might ask, “What’s your favorite cuisine for a special lunch outing?”

31. Tuck

This slang term refers to the act of eating. It can be used to describe any meal or snack.

  • For example, “I’m going to tuck into this delicious sandwich.”
  • A person might say, “I’m starving, let’s tuck in!”
  • Someone might ask, “What are you tucking into for lunch today?”

32. Chowdown

This slang term means to eat a large amount of food in a short period of time. It is often used to describe a hearty or indulgent meal.

  • For instance, “I’m going to chow down on this burger and fries.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t wait to chow down at the buffet.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “I’m so hungry, let’s chow down!”

33. Grubbery

This slang term refers to a place where food is served, such as a restaurant or cafe. It can also be used to describe a specific meal or food establishment.

  • For example, “Let’s go to that new grubbery for dinner.”
  • A person might say, “I had a delicious meal at that little grubbery downtown.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you know any good grubberies in this area?”

34. Chowtime

This slang term is used to indicate that it is time to eat. It can be used as a playful or informal way to announce mealtime.

  • For instance, “Chowtime, everyone! Dinner is served.”
  • A person might say, “I’m hungry, it’s chowtime.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “Chowtime! Let’s dig in!”

35. Nibble

This slang term means to eat small amounts of food, typically in a slow or leisurely manner. It can also be used to describe snacking or tasting food.

  • For example, “I’m just going to nibble on this cheese and crackers.”
  • A person might say, “I like to nibble on snacks throughout the day.”
  • Someone might ask, “Would you like to nibble on some appetizers before dinner?”

36. Luncheon

Refers to a formal or fancy lunch, often associated with special occasions or events. It is typically a sit-down meal with multiple courses.

  • For example, “The company hosted a luncheon to celebrate their success.”
  • A person might say, “I have a luncheon meeting with a client today.”
  • During a wedding, someone might announce, “Please join us for a luncheon reception after the ceremony.”

37. Bite

Used to refer to a small amount of food or a quick snack. It can also be used as a verb to describe the act of taking a small piece or taste of something.

  • For instance, “I’m just going to grab a bite to eat before we leave.”
  • A person might say, “I need a bite of chocolate to satisfy my sweet tooth.”
  • When sharing food, someone might ask, “Can I have a bite of your sandwich?”

38. Morsel

Refers to a small piece or portion of food. It is often used to describe a delicacy or a small, tasty treat.

  • For example, “She savored every morsel of the decadent dessert.”
  • A person might say, “I only have a morsel of cake left.”
  • When enjoying a dish, someone might comment, “Every morsel of this pasta is bursting with flavor.”

39. Grub down

Used to describe eating a large amount of food or eating with enthusiasm. It implies a hearty and satisfying meal.

  • For instance, “After a long day of hiking, we were ready to grub down on a big meal.”
  • A person might say, “I’m so hungry, let’s find a place to grub down.”
  • When enjoying a delicious meal, someone might exclaim, “This food is so good, I can’t stop grubbing down!”

40. Have a bite

Used to suggest eating a small amount of food or tasting something. It can be used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, “Would you like to have a bite of my dessert?”
  • A person might ask, “Can I have a bite of your sandwich?”
  • When sharing food, someone might offer, “Here, have a bite of this pizza.”

41. Snack

A snack is a small portion of food typically eaten between meals. It can be a light meal or a small food item that is consumed for a quick boost of energy or to satisfy cravings.

  • For example, “I’m feeling hungry, I’ll grab a snack from the vending machine.”
  • Someone might say, “I love snacking on carrot sticks and hummus.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you want to share a snack with me?”

42. Scoff

To scoff means to eat something quickly and greedily. It often implies that the person is eating in a voracious or indulgent manner.

  • For instance, “He scoffed down his sandwich and rushed back to work.”
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t resist, I scoffed the whole bag of chips.”
  • Someone might comment, “She scoffs her food so fast, it’s impressive.”

43. Munch on

To munch on means to eat something steadily and with enjoyment. It often suggests eating in a relaxed and leisurely manner, savoring the flavors.

  • For example, “I like to munch on popcorn while watching movies.”
  • Someone might say, “Let’s grab some sandwiches and munch on them in the park.”
  • A person might comment, “I’m just munching on some grapes to satisfy my sweet tooth.”
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