Top 59 Slang For Maintain – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to staying on top of the latest slang, we’ve got you covered. Whether you’re trying to fit in with the cool kids or simply want to understand what your younger colleagues are saying, our team at FluentSlang has compiled a list of the top slang for “maintain”. From phrases that describe keeping things in order to words that signify staying true to oneself, this listicle will ensure you’re in the know and ready to impress with your up-to-date vocabulary.

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1. Keep up

To continue doing something or to stay informed about something.

  • For example, “I need to keep up with the latest fashion trends.”
  • A teacher might say, “Make sure you keep up with your assignments.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you keep up with the fast pace of this game?”

2. Hold down

To maintain control or responsibility for something.

  • For instance, “She’s able to hold down a full-time job and take care of her family.”
  • A manager might say, “I trust you to hold down the fort while I’m away.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you hold down the fort while I run to the store?”

3. Stay on top of

To stay informed or updated about something.

  • For example, “I need to stay on top of my emails to avoid falling behind.”
  • A student might say, “I have to stay on top of my assignments to maintain good grades.”
  • A supervisor might remind their team, “Make sure you stay on top of the project timeline.”

4. Keep in check

To control or manage something to prevent it from becoming a problem or getting out of hand.

  • For instance, “Regular exercise helps keep my weight in check.”
  • A teacher might say, “Please keep your behavior in check during class.”
  • A parent might remind their child, “You need to keep your emotions in check when you’re upset.”

5. Preserve

To maintain or protect something in its original or existing state.

  • For example, “We need to preserve this historical building for future generations.”
  • A chef might say, “Preserve the freshness of the ingredients by storing them properly.”
  • A nature enthusiast might advocate for preserving wildlife habitats.

6. Sustain

To sustain something means to keep it going or maintain it over a period of time. It can refer to both physical and abstract things.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need to sustain my energy for the marathon.”
  • In a discussion about environmental conservation, someone might argue, “We need to sustain our natural resources for future generations.”
  • A teacher might encourage their students, “Keep studying and sustain your effort throughout the semester.”

7. Manage

To manage something means to handle it or take care of it in an organized or efficient manner. It can refer to tasks, responsibilities, or resources.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to manage my time better to get everything done.”
  • In a business setting, someone might discuss their role, saying, “I manage a team of employees.”
  • A parent might advise their child, “Learn how to manage your money wisely.”

8. Upkeep

Upkeep refers to the regular maintenance or care required to keep something in good condition.

  • For example, a homeowner might say, “I need to do some upkeep on the house this weekend.”
  • In a discussion about car ownership, someone might mention, “Regular oil changes are part of the vehicle’s upkeep.”
  • A facility manager might discuss the importance of upkeep, saying, “We prioritize the upkeep of our equipment to ensure smooth operations.”

9. Look after

To look after something means to take care of it or be responsible for its well-being.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Can you look after my dog while I’m out of town?”
  • In a discussion about elderly parents, someone might mention, “I have to look after my mom and make sure she’s okay.”
  • A babysitter might tell the parents, “I’ll look after your kids and make sure they’re safe.”

10. Watch over

To watch over something means to guard or protect it, keeping a close eye on it to ensure its safety or well-being.

  • For example, a security guard might say, “I’m here to watch over the building and prevent any unauthorized access.”
  • In a discussion about a neighborhood watch program, someone might mention, “We take turns watching over the community and reporting any suspicious activity.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “I’ll watch over you while you play at the park to make sure you’re safe.”

11. Care for

Taking care of something or someone, ensuring their well-being and maintenance. “Care for” is often used when referring to the maintenance of physical objects or the well-being of living things.

  • For example, a parent might say, “I need to care for my plants by watering them regularly.”
  • When discussing the upkeep of a car, someone might say, “You need to care for your vehicle by getting regular oil changes.”
  • A pet owner might say, “I care for my dog by taking him for walks and feeding him nutritious food.”

12. Guard

To watch over and protect something or someone from harm or damage. “Guard” is often used when referring to the maintenance of security or the protection of valuable assets.

  • For instance, a security guard might say, “I guard this building to ensure its safety.”
  • When discussing the protection of personal information, someone might say, “You need to guard your passwords and personal data.”
  • A parent might say, “I guard my children by teaching them about safety and monitoring their activities.”

13. Tend to

To give attention to and take care of something or someone. “Tend to” is often used when referring to the maintenance of tasks or responsibilities.

  • For example, a gardener might say, “I tend to the plants by watering them and removing weeds.”
  • When discussing household chores, someone might say, “I tend to the laundry by sorting, washing, and folding the clothes.”
  • A manager might say, “I tend to my team by providing guidance, feedback, and support.”

14. Hold together

To maintain the structure, stability, or coherence of something. “Hold together” is often used when referring to the maintenance of physical objects or the cohesion of a group.

  • For instance, a carpenter might say, “I need to hold this table together with strong glue.”
  • When discussing a team or organization, someone might say, “Effective communication is crucial to hold the team together.”
  • A parent might say, “I try to hold our family together by fostering open communication and resolving conflicts.”

15. Carry on

To continue an action, task, or behavior despite difficulties or challenges. “Carry on” is often used when referring to the maintenance of perseverance or resilience.

  • For example, a student might say, “I need to carry on studying even when the material is challenging.”
  • When discussing a project, someone might say, “We must carry on despite setbacks to achieve our goals.”
  • A coach might say, “I encourage my athletes to carry on and give their best effort, even when they face tough opponents.”

16. Stick with

This phrase means to persist or remain committed to something.

  • For example, if someone is trying to lose weight, they might say, “I’m going to stick with my diet and exercise routine.”
  • In a conversation about career goals, someone might advise, “Find something you’re passionate about and stick with it.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “No matter what happens, stick with the game plan.”

17. Keep going

This phrase means to continue or carry on with something.

  • For instance, if someone is feeling tired during a workout, they might say, “I just need to push through and keep going.”
  • In a discussion about overcoming challenges, someone might say, “No matter what obstacles come your way, keep going.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage their audience by saying, “Remember, success is all about perseverance and the ability to keep going.”

18. Keep intact

This phrase means to maintain or preserve something in its original or proper condition.

  • For example, when moving fragile items, someone might say, “Be careful to keep the boxes intact.”
  • In a discussion about historical artifacts, a curator might emphasize the importance of keeping them intact for future generations.
  • A homeowner might take precautions to keep their furniture intact during a renovation project.
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19. Keep in shape

This phrase means to maintain physical fitness or a healthy condition.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I try to exercise regularly to keep in shape.”
  • In a conversation about health and wellness, someone might advise, “Eating a balanced diet and staying active are key to keeping in shape.”
  • A fitness trainer might recommend specific exercises to help individuals keep in shape.

20. Keep in order

This phrase means to maintain or ensure that something remains organized or arranged properly.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Please keep your desks in order.”
  • In a discussion about time management, someone might emphasize the importance of keeping tasks and priorities in order.
  • A supervisor might advise their team to keep their workstations in order to improve efficiency.

21. Keep functioning

This phrase means to ensure that something continues to operate or perform its intended function without any issues.

  • For example, if a computer is experiencing technical problems, a person might say, “I need to figure out how to keep it functioning.”
  • In a discussion about a car’s engine, someone might ask, “What can I do to keep it functioning at its best?”
  • A manager might tell their employees, “It’s important to follow the maintenance schedule to keep the equipment functioning properly.”

22. Keep alive

This slang phrase means to maintain or preserve something, often in a figurative sense, to ensure it continues to exist or remain relevant.

  • For instance, in a conversation about a dying art form, someone might say, “We need to do something to keep it alive.”
  • When discussing a struggling business, a person might suggest, “We need to come up with new ideas to keep it alive.”
  • A music lover might encourage others, “Support your favorite artists to keep their music alive.”

23. Keep steady

This phrase means to maintain a consistent or stable state or condition.

  • For example, in a discussion about financial investments, someone might advise, “Keep steady and don’t panic during market fluctuations.”
  • When giving driving advice, a person might say, “Keep steady pressure on the brakes to maintain control of the vehicle.”
  • A coach might instruct their team, “Focus on your technique and keep steady to improve your performance.”

24. Keep on track

This slang phrase means to stay focused and maintain progress towards a goal or objective.

  • For instance, in a project management context, someone might say, “We need to keep on track to meet the deadline.”
  • When discussing personal development, a person might advise, “Set clear goals and take consistent action to keep on track.”
  • A teacher might remind their students, “Review your notes regularly to keep on track with the curriculum.”

25. Keep in line

This phrase means to ensure compliance or adherence to rules, guidelines, or expectations.

  • For example, in a classroom setting, a teacher might say, “Please keep in line and follow the instructions.”
  • When discussing organizational behavior, a manager might emphasize, “Employees need to keep in line with company policies.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Behave and keep in line with the rules at school.”

26. Keep under control

To maintain control or supervision over something or someone. This phrase is often used to describe keeping a situation or person in check.

  • For example, a parent might say to their child, “You need to keep your emotions under control.”
  • In a workplace setting, a manager might tell their team, “We need to keep the project under control to meet the deadline.”
  • A coach might instruct their players, “Keep the game under control and play smart.”

27. Hold it down

To keep a situation or place calm and under control. This phrase is often used to describe maintaining order in a specific environment.

  • For instance, a bouncer at a club might say, “I need you to hold it down and prevent any fights.”
  • In a household, a parent might tell their children, “While I’m gone, you need to hold it down and behave.”
  • A team captain might say to their teammates, “We need to hold it down and stay focused on winning.”

28. Stick with it

To continue doing something despite challenges or difficulties. This phrase is often used to encourage someone to maintain their commitment or effort.

  • For example, a teacher might say to a struggling student, “Don’t give up, stick with it and you’ll improve.”
  • In a fitness class, an instructor might say, “It’s tough, but stick with it and you’ll see results.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “We’re behind, but if we stick with it, we can turn the game around.”

29. Stay in the game

To continue participating or being active in a particular situation or endeavor. This phrase is often used to encourage someone to stay engaged and not give up.

  • For instance, a mentor might advise their mentee, “Even when things get tough, stay in the game and keep learning.”
  • In a competitive sport, a coach might say to their player, “You’re struggling, but stay in the game and give it your all.”
  • A supervisor might tell their employee, “We’re going through changes, but I want you to stay in the game and contribute your ideas.”

30. Keep the ball rolling

To continue progress or activity in a positive direction. This phrase is often used to encourage the continuation of a successful or productive situation.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “Great job on the first task, let’s keep the ball rolling and tackle the next one.”
  • In a brainstorming session, someone might suggest, “We have some good ideas, let’s keep the ball rolling and build on them.”
  • A project manager might remind their team, “We’re making good progress, let’s keep the ball rolling and meet our deadlines.”

31. Stay in the loop

This phrase means to stay updated or aware of the latest information or developments regarding a particular situation or topic.

  • For example, in a work setting, a colleague might say, “Make sure to stay in the loop on this project so you know what’s going on.”
  • In a group chat, someone might ask, “Can you keep me in the loop about the party details?”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll keep you in the loop about any changes to our plans for the weekend.”

32. Keep the faith

This phrase is used to encourage someone to continue believing in something or to not lose hope, especially in difficult or challenging situations.

  • For instance, during a tough time, a friend might say, “Keep the faith, things will get better.”
  • In a religious context, a pastor might say, “Even in times of doubt, it’s important to keep the faith.”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “No matter what obstacles you face, remember to keep the faith and believe in yourself.”

33. Hold the fort

This phrase means to maintain control or stability in a particular situation, especially when faced with challenges or in someone’s absence.

  • For example, if a manager goes on vacation, they might say to a colleague, “Can you hold the fort while I’m away?”
  • In a sports game, a coach might say, “We’re ahead, so let’s hold the fort and not let the opposing team score.”
  • In a team meeting, a leader might say, “We’re going through some changes, but we need to hold the fort and stay focused on our goals.”

34. Keep it together

This phrase means to maintain composure or control in a situation, especially when facing stress, pressure, or emotional challenges.

  • For instance, if someone is feeling overwhelmed, a friend might say, “Take a deep breath and keep it together.”
  • In a high-pressure job, a supervisor might say, “During busy times, it’s important to keep it together and stay focused.”
  • A parent might say to their child before a performance, “You’ve practiced a lot, so just relax and keep it together on stage.”

35. Stay the course

This phrase means to continue on the same path or course of action, especially when faced with obstacles or challenges.

  • For example, in a long-term project, a team leader might say, “We’re facing some setbacks, but we need to stay the course and keep working towards our goal.”
  • In a relationship, a partner might say, “We’re going through a rough patch, but let’s stay the course and work through it together.”
  • A coach might say to their team, “We’re behind, but if we stay the course and give it our all, we can still win the game.”

36. Hold your ground

This phrase means to maintain your position or stance, especially in the face of opposition or pressure. It can be used both literally and figuratively.

  • For example, during a debate, someone might say, “I will hold my ground and defend my point of view.”
  • In a physical confrontation, a person might shout, “Hold your ground!” as a way to encourage others to maintain their positions.
  • In a difficult situation, a friend might advise, “Stay strong and hold your ground.”

37. Stay on target

This phrase is often used to remind someone to stay focused on their goal or objective. It emphasizes the importance of maintaining concentration and not getting distracted.

  • For instance, during a project meeting, a team leader might say, “Let’s stay on target and not lose sight of our end goal.”
  • When studying for an exam, a student might remind themselves, “Stay on target and don’t get sidetracked by social media.”
  • In a sports competition, a coach might encourage their team, “Stay on target and give it your all until the final whistle.”

38. Keep it alive

This phrase means to keep something going or in existence. It can refer to a variety of situations where continued effort is needed to sustain or preserve something.

  • For example, in a relationship, someone might say, “We need to keep the spark alive by going on dates and making an effort.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “We need to keep the momentum alive by consistently delivering high-quality products.”
  • When talking about a tradition or custom, someone might say, “We must keep it alive by passing it down to future generations.”

39. Hold the line

This phrase is often used in a military or strategic context to mean holding a defensive position and not retreating. It can also be used more generally to mean maintaining a position or stance in any situation.

  • For instance, during a negotiation, someone might say, “We need to hold the line and not give in to their demands.”
  • In a sports game, a coach might shout, “Hold the line!” as a way to encourage the defense to maintain their position.
  • In a discussion or debate, someone might say, “I will hold the line on this issue and not waver in my stance.”

40. Stay in touch

This phrase means to maintain communication or connection with someone. It emphasizes the importance of staying connected and not losing contact.

  • For example, when saying goodbye to a friend, someone might say, “Stay in touch!” as a way to express the desire to maintain the friendship.
  • In a professional setting, a colleague might say, “Let’s stay in touch and continue collaborating on future projects.”
  • When traveling, a person might remind their loved ones, “Stay in touch and let me know how you’re doing.”

41. Keep things running smoothly

This phrase means to maintain the smooth functioning of something, such as a project, organization, or system. It implies the need to prevent any disruptions or issues that could hinder progress or efficiency.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “We need to keep things running smoothly to meet our deadlines.”
  • In a business context, a manager might emphasize the importance of this by stating, “Our goal is to keep things running smoothly to provide excellent customer service.”
  • A teacher might remind students, “If we all contribute and work together, we can keep things running smoothly in the classroom.”

42. Hold the balance

This phrase refers to maintaining a state of balance or stability. It can be used in various contexts, such as in relationships, decision-making, or managing conflicting interests.

  • For instance, a mediator might say, “We need to hold the balance between the needs of both parties.”
  • In a discussion about work-life balance, someone might share, “I try to hold the balance between my career and personal life.”
  • A politician might emphasize the importance of holding the balance in policy-making by stating, “We must consider all perspectives to hold the balance and make fair decisions.”

43. Stay in shape

This phrase is commonly used to refer to the act of maintaining physical fitness through exercise and healthy habits. It implies the need to take care of one’s body and overall well-being.

  • For example, a fitness instructor might encourage their class by saying, “Let’s all stay in shape and reach our fitness goals together!”
  • In a conversation about health, someone might share their routine by saying, “I try to stay in shape by going for a run and eating nutritious meals.”
  • A doctor might advise a patient, “Regular exercise and a balanced diet are essential to stay in shape and prevent health issues.”

44. Keep the momentum

This phrase means to continue or sustain the progress or forward movement of something. It is often used in contexts where progress or momentum is crucial for achieving goals or success.

  • For instance, a coach might motivate their team by saying, “Let’s keep the momentum and win this game!”
  • In a business setting, a manager might emphasize the need to keep the momentum by stating, “We need to maintain our current pace to achieve our targets.”
  • A student might remind themselves, “I need to keep the momentum in my studies to stay on track and succeed.”

45. Hold onto

This phrase means to maintain possession or control of something. It is often used when referring to physical objects, relationships, or personal beliefs.

  • For example, a parent might advise their child, “Hold onto your dreams and never give up.”
  • In a conversation about personal belongings, someone might say, “I always hold onto sentimental items because they hold special memories.”
  • A coach might instruct their team, “We need to hold onto the ball and maintain possession to secure our victory.”

46. Stay in control

This phrase means to remain in a position of control or power. It is often used in situations where someone needs to maintain authority or dominance.

  • For example, a coach might say to their team, “Stay in control of the game and don’t let the opponent dictate the pace.”
  • In a business setting, a manager might advise their employees, “Stay in control of your workload and prioritize tasks.”
  • A parent might remind their child, “Stay in control of your emotions and think before you react.”

47. Keep it steady

This expression means to keep something stable or steady. It is often used in reference to maintaining a consistent level or state.

  • For instance, a driver might say to their passenger, “Keep it steady while I park the car.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might advise, “Keep it steady and don’t make any impulsive purchases.”
  • A person giving advice on relationships might say, “If you want to build a strong foundation, keep it steady and communicate openly.”

48. Uphold

To uphold means to maintain or support something, often referring to principles, values, or standards. It involves keeping something in its proper or desired condition.

  • For example, a judge might say, “It is my duty to uphold the law and ensure justice is served.”
  • In a discussion about ethics, someone might argue, “We must uphold moral values and hold ourselves to a higher standard.”
  • A teacher might remind their students, “It is important to uphold academic integrity and avoid plagiarism.”

49. Retain

Retain means to keep or hold onto something. It is often used in the context of preserving or maintaining possession of something.

  • For instance, a business owner might say, “We need to retain our customers and build loyalty.”
  • In a conversation about memory, someone might say, “To retain information, it helps to actively engage with the material.”
  • A coach might advise their team, “Focus on retaining possession of the ball and minimizing turnovers.”

50. Nurture

To nurture means to care for and encourage the growth or development of something. It is often used in reference to maintaining or fostering a positive environment or relationship.

  • For example, a parent might say, “We need to nurture our child’s talents and provide support.”
  • In a discussion about a company’s culture, someone might argue, “We should nurture a collaborative and inclusive environment.”
  • A mentor might advise their mentee, “Nurture your professional network and build meaningful connections.”

51. Conserve

To use something carefully in order to prevent waste or depletion. “Conserve” can also mean to protect and preserve something.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m trying to conserve water by taking shorter showers.”
  • In a discussion about environmentalism, someone might argue, “We need to conserve our natural resources for future generations.”
  • A teacher might advise their students, “Remember to conserve your energy for the final exam.”

52. Support

To provide assistance or help to someone or something. “Support” can also mean to endorse or advocate for a particular cause or belief.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I’ll support you in whatever decision you make.”
  • In a political context, a person might state, “I support this candidate because of their stance on healthcare.”
  • A coach might encourage their team by saying, “We’re here to support each other and work towards our common goal.”

53. Stand by

To be ready and available to help or support someone or something. “Stand by” can also mean to remain loyal or committed to a person or cause.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’ll stand by you no matter what.”
  • In a crisis situation, a dispatcher might instruct, “Stay on the line and stand by for further instructions.”
  • A soldier might pledge, “I will always stand by my fellow soldiers and protect our country.”

54. Stick to

To follow or remain loyal to a particular plan, idea, or course of action. “Stick to” can also mean to persist or continue with something.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m going to stick to my diet and avoid junk food.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “We should stick to the facts and avoid personal attacks.”
  • A teacher might remind their students, “Stick to the topic and avoid going off on tangents.”

55. Keep on top

To stay organized and in control of a situation or task. “Keep on top” can also mean to stay informed or up to date on a particular subject.

  • For example, a manager might say, “We need to keep on top of our deadlines and ensure everything is running smoothly.”
  • In a fast-paced industry, a person might advise, “Stay on top of the latest trends and technologies to remain competitive.”
  • A parent might remind their child, “Keep on top of your homework assignments and study regularly.”

56. Keep the rhythm

To continue playing or moving in a steady rhythm or pace. This phrase is often used in music or dance contexts.

  • For example, a music teacher might say, “Make sure to keep the rhythm steady throughout the song.”
  • A dance instructor might instruct their students, “Focus on keeping the rhythm while performing the choreography.”
  • In a band rehearsal, a drummer might remind the other musicians, “Let’s all keep the rhythm tight during this section.”

57. Keep an eye on

To pay attention to or closely observe something or someone. This phrase is often used when there is a need to watch over or ensure the safety or well-being of someone or something.

  • For instance, a parent might tell their child, “Keep an eye on your younger sibling while I’m out.”
  • A supervisor might instruct an employee, “Please keep an eye on the production line and report any issues.”
  • In a neighborhood watch meeting, a member might say, “Let’s all keep an eye on each other’s houses to prevent break-ins.”

58. Hold on

To pause or wait for a moment. This phrase is often used to ask someone to wait or to indicate that the speaker needs a moment to complete a task or gather their thoughts.

  • For example, if someone is on the phone and needs to find a pen, they might say, “Hold on, let me grab a pen.”
  • A person rushing to catch a bus might shout, “Hold on, I’m coming!”
  • In a conversation, if someone needs to answer a call, they might say, “Hold on, I have to take this.”

59. Carry through

To see something through to completion or to follow through with a task or plan. This phrase is often used to emphasize the importance of finishing what one has started.

  • For instance, a coach might motivate their team, saying, “We’ve come this far, let’s carry through and win the championship.”
  • A project manager might remind their team, “We need to carry through with our original timeline to meet the deadline.”
  • In a personal goal-setting discussion, someone might say, “I’m determined to carry through with my fitness routine and reach my target weight.”