Top 45 Slang For Major – Meaning & Usage

Choosing a major in college is a big decision, and it’s important to stay up-to-date with the latest lingo in order to fit in with your fellow students. Whether you’re a freshman trying to navigate your way through the college slang jungle or a senior looking to brush up on your knowledge, we’ve got you covered. In this article, we’ve compiled a list of the top slang terms for major that will have you speaking the language of your chosen field in no time. Get ready to impress your classmates and show off your major swag!

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1. Skipper

A term used to refer to the person in charge or the leader of a group or organization. It can also be used to address someone with authority or a high rank.

  • For example, in the military, a skipper is the commander of a ship or a boat.
  • In a sports team, the skipper is usually the captain or the coach.
  • A person might say, “Ask the skipper for permission before making any decisions.”

2. Top Brass

This term is used to describe the highest-ranking officers or officials in a military or organizational hierarchy. It refers to those individuals who hold the most authority or power.

  • For instance, in the military, the top brass refers to the highest-ranking officers, such as generals or admirals.
  • In a corporate setting, the top brass may refer to the CEO or other high-level executives.
  • A person might say, “The top brass will be making the final decision on this matter.”

3. Big Cheese

This slang term is used to refer to someone who is important, influential, or in a position of power or authority. It is often used in a lighthearted or informal manner.

  • For example, in a company, the big cheese might be the CEO or the president.
  • In a group of friends, the big cheese might be the person who makes all the decisions.
  • A person might say, “I need to talk to the big cheese about this issue.”

This term is used to refer to the person in charge or the leader of a group or organization. It is often used in a playful or informal way.

  • For instance, in a company, the head honcho might be the CEO or the manager.
  • In a group project, the head honcho is the person who takes charge and makes decisions.
  • A person might say, “Let’s ask the head honcho for approval before moving forward.”

5. Big Kahuna

This slang term is used to refer to someone who is important, influential, or in a position of power or authority. It is often used in a lighthearted or informal manner.

  • For example, in a company, the big kahuna might be the CEO or the top executive.
  • In a group of friends, the big kahuna might be the person who has the final say.
  • A person might say, “I’ll have to check with the big kahuna before making a decision.”

6. Bigwig

A bigwig is a person with a high level of importance or influence in a particular field or organization.

  • For example, “The bigwig in the company made all the major decisions.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “The bigwigs in Washington are the ones pulling the strings.”
  • A journalist might write, “The bigwig in the entertainment industry is rumored to be stepping down from their position.”

7. Top Dog

The term “top dog” refers to the person who holds the highest position or has the most authority in a particular group or organization.

  • For instance, “The top dog in the company is the CEO.”
  • In a sports team, the top dog might be the coach or captain.
  • A person discussing politics might say, “The top dog in the country is the president.”

8. Big Shot

A big shot is a person who holds a position of power or influence and is often well-known or respected in their field.

  • For example, “He’s a big shot in the music industry.”
  • In a discussion about business, someone might say, “The big shots in the company make all the major decisions.”
  • A journalist might write, “The big shot politician is running for re-election.”

9. High Muckety-Muck

This term is often used in a sarcastic or humorous way to refer to someone who is perceived as being overly important or self-important.

  • For instance, “The high muckety-muck thinks they can boss everyone around.”
  • In a discussion about office politics, someone might say, “The high muckety-mucks always get the best assignments.”
  • A person jokingly referring to themselves might say, “I’m just a high muckety-muck around here.”

10. Big Enchilada

The term “big enchilada” is often used to refer to the person or thing that holds the highest level of importance or influence in a particular situation.

  • For example, “He’s the big enchilada in the company.”
  • In a discussion about a sports team, someone might say, “The quarterback is the big enchilada.”
  • A person discussing politics might say, “The president is the big enchilada in the country.”

11. Big Fish

This term refers to someone who holds a position of power or influence. It is often used to describe someone who is successful or has achieved a high level of status.

  • For example, in a business context, one might say, “He’s a big fish in the industry.”
  • In a social setting, someone might comment, “She’s a big fish in this town.”
  • A journalist might write, “The CEO of the company is a big fish in the corporate world.”

12. Big Wheel

Similar to “big fish,” this term also refers to someone who holds a position of power or influence. It is often used to describe someone who is well-connected or has a lot of authority.

  • For instance, in a political context, one might say, “He’s a big wheel in the government.”
  • In a professional setting, someone might comment, “She’s a big wheel in the industry.”
  • A journalist might write, “The mayor of the city is a big wheel in local politics.”

13. Top Banana

This term refers to the most important or influential person in a group or organization. It is often used to describe someone who is the leader or the highest-ranking individual.

  • For example, in a theater production, one might say, “He’s the top banana in the cast.”
  • In a business setting, someone might comment, “She’s the top banana in the company.”
  • A journalist might write, “The president of the organization is the top banana in the industry.”

14. Big Wigwam

This term refers to someone who is highly influential or important. It is often used to describe someone who has a lot of power or authority in a particular field.

  • For instance, in a legal context, one might say, “He’s a big wigwam in the courtroom.”
  • In a professional setting, someone might comment, “She’s a big wigwam in the industry.”
  • A journalist might write, “The CEO of the company is a big wigwam in the business world.”

15. Big Banana

This term refers to someone who is significant or important. It is often used to describe someone who has a lot of influence or control over a situation.

  • For example, in a political context, one might say, “He’s the big banana in the party.”
  • In a professional setting, someone might comment, “She’s the big banana in the department.”
  • A journalist might write, “The director of the organization is the big banana in the industry.”

16. Chief

This term refers to someone who is in charge or holds a position of authority. It can be used to address someone directly or to describe their role.

  • For example, in a military setting, a soldier might say, “Yes, Chief!” to acknowledge a command from their superior.
  • In a workplace, a colleague might say, “Our team is lucky to have such a great chief.”
  • A friend might introduce their boss by saying, “This is our chief, the one who keeps the office running smoothly.”

17. Main man

This phrase is used to refer to someone who is the most important or influential person in a particular situation or group.

  • For instance, in a group project, someone might say, “Let’s check with the main man before making any decisions.”
  • In a sports team, a player might be referred to as the main man if they consistently perform at a high level.
  • A fan might say, “LeBron James is the main man of the NBA.”

18. Boss

This word is commonly used to describe someone who is in charge or has authority over others. It can be used both formally and informally.

  • For example, an employee might say, “I need to ask the boss for permission.”
  • In a group of friends, someone might jokingly say, “I’m the boss around here.”
  • A colleague might compliment their supervisor by saying, “Our boss is really supportive and understanding.”

19. Captain

This term is often used in a military or sports context to refer to someone who is in charge or has authority over a team or group.

  • For instance, in a soccer team, the captain is usually the player who leads the team on the field and represents them in official matters.
  • In a military setting, a captain is an officer who holds a rank above a lieutenant and is responsible for leading a unit or company.
  • A colleague might say, “Our captain always knows how to motivate the team and get the job done.”

20. Commander

This word is commonly used in a military context to refer to someone who holds a high rank and is in charge of a group of soldiers or a specific operation.

  • For example, in the Navy, a commander is a rank above a lieutenant commander and below a captain.
  • In a war movie, a character might say, “The commander gave the order to attack.”
  • A military veteran might refer to their former commander with respect and admiration.
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21. Leader

This term refers to someone who has authority or is in charge of a group or organization. It can also be used to describe someone who takes the lead in a particular situation or task.

  • For example, in a team project, someone might say, “Let’s follow the leader’s instructions.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “The team’s leader is stepping up and taking control of the game.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage the audience by saying, “Be a leader, not a follower.”

This term is used to refer to someone who is in charge or has authority over others. It can also be used to describe someone who is the most important or influential person in a particular group or organization.

  • For instance, in a workplace, someone might say, “I need to check with the head before making any decisions.”
  • In a school setting, a student might say, “The head of the student council organized a charity event.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “Listen to the head, or else!”

23. Chief executive

This term is an abbreviation for “Chief Executive Officer.” It refers to the highest-ranking executive in a company or organization. The CEO is responsible for making major corporate decisions and managing the overall operations of the company.

  • For example, in a business article, you might read, “The CEO of the company announced a new strategic plan.”
  • In a conversation about career goals, someone might say, “My dream is to become a CEO someday.”
  • A business student might study the leadership style of famous CEOs and say, “Steve Jobs was a visionary CEO who transformed the tech industry.”

24. Principal

This term is often used to refer to the person who holds the highest position or has the most authority in a school. It can also be used more generally to describe someone who is in charge or has a position of leadership.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I got called to the principal’s office today.”
  • In a workplace, someone might say, “The principal of the company has a clear vision for its future.”
  • A friend might playfully say, “You’re the principal of this group project, make sure everyone does their part!”

25. Director

This term is used to refer to someone who is in charge or has authority over a particular department or organization. It can also be used more generally to describe someone who is the leader or decision-maker in a given situation.

  • For example, in a film production, someone might say, “The director is responsible for bringing the script to life.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might ask, “When will the director make a final decision on this proposal?”
  • A friend might say, “You’re the director of this road trip, decide where we’re going!”

26. General

In military slang, a “General” refers to a high-ranking officer in the army, air force, or marines. It is also used more broadly to describe someone in a position of authority or power.

  • For example, “The general gave the orders for the troops to advance.”
  • In a workplace setting, someone might say, “I need to speak with the general about this issue.”
  • A person might describe their boss as “the general” when talking about their management style.
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27. Colonel

In military slang, a “Colonel” is a senior officer rank in the army, air force, or marines. It is often used to refer to someone who is in charge or has a position of authority.

  • For instance, “The colonel made the final decision on the mission plan.”
  • In a corporate setting, someone might say, “The colonel of the department is a tough but fair leader.”
  • A person might use the term “bird colonel” to emphasize someone’s high rank or authority.

28. Commander-in-chief

In military slang, “Commander-in-chief” refers to the highest-ranking officer of a military force or organization. It is often used to describe someone who has ultimate authority or control.

  • For example, “The commander-in-chief gave the order to mobilize the troops.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “The commander-in-chief is responsible for making decisions about national security.”
  • A person might use the term “top brass” to refer to high-ranking military officials.

29. Admiral

In military slang, an “Admiral” is a high-ranking officer in the navy or coast guard. It is also used more broadly to describe someone who is highly skilled or experienced in their field.

  • For instance, “The admiral oversees the naval operations in the region.”
  • In a sports context, someone might say, “He’s the admiral of the basketball team, leading them to victory.”
  • A person might use the term “top gun” to emphasize someone’s expertise or skill.

30. Lieutenant

In military slang, a “Lieutenant” is a junior officer rank in the army, air force, or marines. It is often used to refer to someone who is second in command or has a position of authority.

  • For example, “The lieutenant led the platoon into battle.”
  • In a business setting, someone might say, “The lieutenant is responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operations.”
  • A person might use the term “second-in-command” to describe someone who is next in line for a leadership role.

31. Major general

This is a high-ranking military officer rank, above a brigadier general and below a lieutenant general. The term “top brass” is often used to refer to high-ranking officers in general.

  • For example, during a military briefing, someone might say, “We received orders from the top brass to proceed with the mission.”
  • In a discussion about military strategy, one might mention, “The major general played a key role in planning the operation.”
  • A soldier might say, “I hope the top brass recognizes our efforts and promotes us.”

32. Brigadier

This is a military rank above colonel and below major general. The term “one-star” refers to the insignia worn by a brigadier, which consists of a single star.

  • For instance, a soldier might say, “I was just promoted to one-star. I’m now a brigadier.”
  • In a discussion about military hierarchy, one might explain, “A brigadier is responsible for commanding a brigade.”
  • Someone might ask, “Who’s the one-star in charge of this operation?”

33. Sergeant major

This is a senior non-commissioned officer rank in the armed forces. The term “top sergeant” is often used to refer to a sergeant major, who holds a leadership position within a unit.

  • For example, a soldier might say, “I have a lot of respect for the top sergeant. He’s a great leader.”
  • In a discussion about military structure, one might explain, “The sergeant major serves as a bridge between enlisted personnel and officers.”
  • A sergeant might ask, “What does it take to become a top sergeant?”

34. First sergeant

This is a senior non-commissioned officer rank in the armed forces, above a sergeant and below a sergeant major. The term “top kick” is often used to refer to a first sergeant, who is responsible for the morale, welfare, and discipline of the enlisted personnel within a unit.

  • For instance, a soldier might say, “The top kick is always looking out for us. He’s a great leader.”
  • In a discussion about military roles, one might explain, “The first sergeant serves as a liaison between the enlisted personnel and the unit’s officers.”
  • Someone might ask, “Who’s the top kick of this platoon?”

35. Master sergeant

This is a senior non-commissioned officer rank in the armed forces, above a sergeant first class and below a sergeant major. The term “top enlisted” is often used to refer to a master sergeant, who holds a leadership position within a unit.

  • For example, a soldier might say, “I aspire to be a top enlisted like the master sergeant.”
  • In a discussion about military ranks, one might explain, “A master sergeant is highly respected for their experience and expertise.”
  • A sergeant might ask, “What does it take to become a top enlisted like the master sergeant?”

36. Chief warrant officer

This term is used to refer to a chief warrant officer, which is a rank in the military. It is often used in a lighthearted or teasing manner.

  • For example, a fellow soldier might say, “Hey, cherry, can you grab me a coffee?”
  • In a military setting, someone might say, “The cherry over there just got promoted.”
  • A chief warrant officer might introduce themselves by saying, “I’m Chief Warrant Officer Johnson, but you can just call me cherry.”

37. Warrant officer

This term is used to refer to a warrant officer, which is a rank in the military. It is a shortened version of their official rank title.

  • For instance, a soldier might say, “I need to talk to Warrant about my leave request.”
  • In a military conversation, someone might ask, “Have you seen Warrant around?”
  • A warrant officer might sign an email with, “Regards, Warrant Officer Thompson.”

38. Staff sergeant

This term is used to refer to a staff sergeant, which is a rank in the military. It is a shortened version of their official rank title.

  • For example, a soldier might say, “Staff wants everyone in formation in 10 minutes.”
  • In a military conversation, someone might ask, “Did you hear what Staff said about the mission?”
  • A staff sergeant might introduce themselves by saying, “I’m Staff Sergeant Davis, nice to meet you.”

39. Technical sergeant

This term is used to refer to a technical sergeant, which is a rank in the military. It is a shortened version of their official rank title.

  • For instance, a soldier might say, “Tech is in charge of maintenance for our unit.”
  • In a military conversation, someone might ask, “Did you see what Tech did to fix that equipment?”
  • A technical sergeant might introduce themselves by saying, “I’m Technical Sergeant Parker, but you can call me Tech.”

40. Senior airman

This term is used to refer to a senior airman, which is a rank in the Air Force. It is a shortened version of their official rank title.

  • For example, a fellow airman might say, “Senior, can you help me with this task?”
  • In an Air Force conversation, someone might ask, “Did you hear what Senior said during the meeting?”
  • A senior airman might introduce themselves by saying, “I’m Senior Airman Johnson, nice to meet you.”

41. Airman first class

This is a rank in the United States Air Force that is above Airman and below Senior Airman. It is typically abbreviated as “A1C”.

  • For example, a conversation might go, “Congratulations on your promotion to Airman first class!”
  • In a discussion about military ranks, one might say, “Airman first class is the third enlisted rank in the Air Force.”
  • A member of the Air Force might mention, “I was recently promoted from Airman to Airman first class.”

42. Airman

This is a rank in the United States Air Force that is above Airman Basic and below Airman First Class. It is typically abbreviated as “Amn”.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just enlisted in the Air Force as an Airman.”
  • In a conversation about military service, a person might mention, “I started as an Airman and worked my way up.”
  • A member of the Air Force might say, “As an Airman, I am responsible for maintaining aircraft and equipment.”

43. Private first class

This is a rank in the United States Army and Marine Corps that is above Private and below Specialist. It is typically abbreviated as “PFC”.

  • For example, in a military movie, a character might say, “I just got promoted to Private first class!”
  • In a discussion about military ranks, one might explain, “Private first class is the third enlisted rank in the Army and Marine Corps.”
  • A soldier might mention, “I was recently promoted from Private to Private first class.”

44. Specialist

This is a rank in the United States Army and Marine Corps that is above Private First Class and below Corporal. It is typically abbreviated as “SPC”.

  • For instance, a soldier might say, “I am currently serving as a Specialist in the Army.”
  • In a conversation about military ranks, one might mention, “Specialist is the fourth enlisted rank in the Army and Marine Corps.”
  • A member of the military might say, “I recently achieved the rank of Specialist.”

45. Corporal

This is a rank in the United States Army and Marine Corps that is above Specialist and below Sergeant. It is typically abbreviated as “CPL”.

  • For example, in a military setting, a superior might say, “Congratulations on your promotion to Corporal!”
  • In a discussion about military ranks, one might explain, “Corporal is the fifth enlisted rank in the Army and Marine Corps.”
  • A soldier might mention, “I recently advanced from Specialist to Corporal.”