Top 25 Slang For Manage – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to the workplace, knowing the right slang can make you sound like a seasoned professional. Whether you’re a newbie or a seasoned pro, keeping up with the latest slang for “manage” is essential for effective communication. That’s why we’ve compiled a list of the top slang terms that will help you navigate the world of management like a boss. Get ready to level up your managerial vocabulary and impress your colleagues with our expertly curated selection of the most popular slang for “manage”.

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1. Handle

To “handle” something means to take charge or control of a situation or task. It can also refer to managing or dealing with something.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “I’ll handle the meeting with the clients.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, someone might say, “I can handle the pressure.”
  • A person discussing their workload might say, “I have a lot to handle this week.”

2. Run the show

To “run the show” means to be in control or in charge of a situation. It refers to taking the lead and making decisions.

  • For instance, a project manager might say, “I’ll run the show and make sure everything stays on track.”
  • In a discussion about a successful event, someone might say, “She really ran the show and made it a memorable experience.”
  • A person describing their role in a team might say, “I’m the one who runs the show and keeps everyone organized.”

3. Boss

To “boss” means to be the leader or supervisor in a situation. It refers to having authority and making decisions.

  • For example, a manager might say, “I’m the boss around here, so listen to what I say.”
  • In a conversation about a strict supervisor, someone might say, “He’s a real boss, always telling us what to do.”
  • A person describing their leadership style might say, “I like to be a boss who empowers my team and leads by example.”

4. Juggle

To “juggle” means to handle or manage multiple tasks or responsibilities at the same time. It refers to balancing different commitments.

  • For instance, a working parent might say, “I have to juggle my job, taking care of the kids, and household chores.”
  • In a discussion about time management, someone might say, “I’m really good at juggling multiple projects and meeting deadlines.”
  • A person describing their busy schedule might say, “I’m constantly juggling work, school, and my social life.”

5. Rock

To “rock” means to handle something exceptionally well or to excel at it. It refers to performing with skill or success.

  • For example, a musician might say, “I can rock the guitar like no one else.”
  • In a conversation about a successful presentation, someone might say, “She really rocked the presentation and impressed the audience.”
  • A person describing their ability to handle pressure might say, “I thrive in high-stress situations and rock under pressure.”

6. Steer

To “steer” means to guide or control a situation or group of people. It implies taking charge and making decisions.

  • For example, in a team meeting, a leader might say, “I will steer this project towards success.”
  • A manager might advise their employees, “You need to steer clear of any distractions and focus on the task at hand.”
  • In a discussion about leadership, someone might comment, “A good leader knows how to steer their team in the right direction.”

To “navigate” means to find a way through a difficult situation or to successfully manage a complex task.

  • For instance, a person facing a challenging problem might say, “I need to navigate this issue and find a solution.”
  • In a conversation about career advancement, someone might mention, “Navigating the corporate ladder requires strategic planning and networking.”
  • A project manager might explain, “My role is to navigate the team through the various stages of the project.”

8. Pull off

To “pull off” means to successfully accomplish or achieve something, often despite challenges or obstacles.

  • For example, a person might say, “I managed to pull off the event despite the bad weather.”
  • In a discussion about difficult tasks, someone might comment, “It takes skill and determination to pull off a successful product launch.”
  • A coach might praise their team by saying, “They really pulled off an impressive comeback in the game.”

9. Call the shots

To “call the shots” means to be in charge or have the authority to make decisions.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m the boss here, I call the shots.”
  • In a discussion about leadership, someone might comment, “A good leader knows when to delegate and when to call the shots.”
  • A manager might explain their role by saying, “I oversee the team and call the shots on important projects.”

10. Handle like a pro

To “handle like a pro” means to manage a task or situation with expertise and skill.

  • For example, a person might say, “He handled the difficult customer complaint like a pro.”
  • In a conversation about multitasking, someone might mention, “She can handle multiple projects at once and still deliver quality work.”
  • A supervisor might commend their employee by saying, “You handled the challenging situation with professionalism and grace.”

11. Keep it together

To remain calm and composed in a challenging or stressful situation. “Keep it together” is often used as a reminder to maintain control and not let emotions or stress overwhelm oneself.

  • For example, during a difficult presentation, a colleague might whisper, “Just keep it together, you’re doing great.”
  • In a high-pressure sports game, a coach might yell, “Stay focused and keep it together, we can win this!”
  • A friend might offer support by saying, “I know it’s tough, but you can keep it together and get through this.”

12. Keep on top of

To stay informed or up-to-date on a particular situation or task. “Keep on top of” implies actively monitoring and managing something to ensure it is under control and progress is being made.

  • For instance, a project manager might say, “I need to keep on top of the deadlines to ensure everything is on track.”
  • In a discussion about current events, someone might mention, “It’s important to keep on top of the latest news to stay informed.”
  • A teacher might advise their students, “Make sure to keep on top of your assignments and study regularly.”

13. Keep things in check

To ensure that a situation or task remains under control and does not spiral out of hand. “Keep things in check” implies actively monitoring and managing various elements to prevent any issues or problems from arising.

  • For example, a manager might say, “I need to keep things in check to ensure a smooth workflow.”
  • In a discussion about personal finances, someone might advise, “It’s important to keep your expenses in check to avoid overspending.”
  • A parent might remind their child, “You need to keep your behavior in check and follow the rules.”

14. Keep the ship afloat

To manage and maintain a situation or organization in a way that ensures its survival or success, especially during challenging times. “Keep the ship afloat” implies taking necessary actions to prevent failure or collapse.

  • For instance, a CEO might say, “During the economic downturn, our priority is to keep the ship afloat and avoid layoffs.”
  • In a discussion about a struggling business, someone might suggest, “We need to come up with a plan to keep the ship afloat and turn things around.”
  • A team leader might motivate their colleagues by saying, “Let’s work together and keep the ship afloat during this difficult project.”

15. Keep the wheels turning

To ensure that progress is being made and things are moving forward smoothly. “Keep the wheels turning” implies actively managing and overseeing tasks and processes to prevent any delays or disruptions.

  • For example, a project manager might say, “We need to keep the wheels turning to meet the project deadline.”
  • In a discussion about productivity, someone might mention, “Having a well-organized schedule helps me keep the wheels turning throughout the day.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “Let’s give it our all and keep the wheels turning until the final whistle.”

16. Rule

To have authority or control over a situation or group of people. This slang term implies being in charge and making decisions.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “I rule this project, and we’re going to finish on time.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might declare, “I rule when it comes to choosing the restaurant for lunch.”
  • A manager might assert their authority by saying, “I rule this department, and I expect everyone to follow my instructions.”

17. Direct

Similar to “rule,” this slang term means to be in control or have authority over a situation or group of people. It implies giving clear instructions and guiding others.

  • For instance, a director might say, “I direct this play, and I expect everyone to follow my vision.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might declare, “I direct this team, and I want everyone to stay focused on the task at hand.”
  • A teacher might assert their authority by saying, “I direct this classroom, and I expect everyone to listen and participate.”

18. Lead

To be at the forefront or take charge of a group or project. This slang term implies guiding and influencing others.

  • For example, a team captain might say, “I lead this team, and we’re going to win the championship.”
  • In a discussion about a group project, someone might assert, “I lead the research efforts, and I’ll make sure we gather all the necessary information.”
  • A manager might declare, “I lead this company, and I’m committed to its success.”

19. Organize

To arrange or structure things in a systematic way. This slang term implies bringing order and efficiency to a situation or task.

  • For instance, a project manager might say, “I organize the workflow, and I make sure everyone knows their roles.”
  • In a discussion about event planning, someone might declare, “I organize all the logistics, from venue selection to guest invitations.”
  • A teacher might assert, “I organize the classroom, ensuring a conducive learning environment for my students.”

20. Coordinate

To harmonize or synchronize different elements or people. This slang term implies aligning and integrating various aspects to achieve a common goal.

  • For example, a wedding planner might say, “I coordinate all the vendors, ensuring everything runs smoothly on the big day.”
  • In a discussion about a team project, someone might declare, “I coordinate the efforts of each team member, making sure we’re all on the same page.”
  • A manager might assert, “I coordinate the different departments, ensuring collaboration and synergy within the organization.”

21. Govern

To govern means to have the authority and control over a group of people or a specific area. It implies making decisions and setting rules or regulations.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “I govern this project and make all the final decisions.”
  • In a political context, a statement like, “The President governs the country and sets the national agenda.”
  • Someone might use this slang in a casual conversation, saying, “I’m the one who calls the shots around here.”

22. Superintend

Superintend means to oversee or supervise a particular activity or process. It implies taking charge and ensuring that everything runs smoothly.

  • For instance, a construction manager might say, “I superintend the entire building project and ensure all tasks are completed on time.”
  • In a school setting, a principal might state, “I superintend the daily operations of the school and ensure a safe learning environment.”
  • A team leader might use this slang to express their role, saying, “I’m the one who oversees and superintends the team’s work.”

23. Administer

Administer means to manage or handle a particular task, responsibility, or situation. It implies taking care of necessary actions or procedures.

  • For example, a nurse might say, “I administer medication to patients and monitor their health.”
  • In a business context, someone might state, “I administer the company’s finances and ensure proper budgeting.”
  • A team member might use this slang to describe their role, saying, “I’m the one who administers the project and keeps everything organized.”

24. Conduct

Conduct means to organize and carry out a particular activity or event. It implies being in charge and leading the proceedings.

  • For instance, a conductor might say, “I conduct the orchestra and guide the musicians during performances.”
  • In a research setting, someone might state, “I conduct experiments and analyze the data to draw conclusions.”
  • A team leader might use this slang to describe their role, saying, “I’m the one who runs the show and ensures the project’s success.”

25. Regulate

Regulate means to control or maintain a particular system, process, or situation. It implies monitoring and adjusting to ensure compliance or efficiency.

  • For example, a government agency might say, “We regulate the financial industry to protect consumers and maintain stability.”
  • In a sports context, someone might state, “The referee regulates the game and enforces the rules.”
  • A team member might use this slang to describe their role, saying, “I’m the one who keeps everything in check and ensures we follow the guidelines.”
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