Top 31 Slang For Mate – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to addressing our buddies, pals, or friends, there’s a whole world of slang words for “mate” that adds a touch of flair to our conversations. From the classic “mate” to trendy alternatives, we’ve got you covered. So, whether you’re looking to expand your vocabulary or simply want to sound more hip and in-the-know, join us as we explore the top slang words for “mate.” Trust us, you won’t want to miss this listicle!

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1. Mate

This term is commonly used in Australian and British English to refer to a friend or companion. It can also be used as a term of endearment.

  • For example, “Hey mate, want to grab a beer after work?”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Thanks for helping me out, mate.”
  • A person might affectionately say, “You’re a good mate, always there for me.”

2. Buddy

A casual term used to refer to a close friend or companion. It is commonly used in American English.

  • For instance, “Hey buddy, let’s catch a movie tonight.”
  • In a playful conversation, someone might say, “What’s up, buddy? Ready for some fun?”
  • A person might express gratitude by saying, “Thanks for being such a great buddy.”

3. Bro/Brah/Braddah

These terms are used to refer to a close friend, often in a male context. They are commonly used in American English and Hawaiian Pidgin.

  • For example, “Hey bro, let’s go surfing this weekend.”
  • In a friendly conversation, someone might say, “What’s up, brah? You ready to hit the beach?”
  • A person might express camaraderie by saying, “We’ve been friends for years, braddah.”

4. Homie/Homeboy/Homegirl

These terms are used to refer to a close friend, often in an urban or hip-hop context. They are commonly used in American English.

  • For instance, “Hey homie, let’s hang out later.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “What’s up, homeboy? You want to grab some food?”
  • A person might show affection by saying, “You’re my ride-or-die homegirl, always there for me.”

5. Pal

A friendly term used to refer to a companion or close friend. It is commonly used in American English.

  • For example, “Hey pal, want to join us for a game of basketball?”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Thanks for the help, pal.”
  • A person might express appreciation by saying, “You’ve been a loyal pal throughout the years.”

6. Chum

Chum is a term used to refer to a close friend or companion. It is often used in a casual and friendly manner.

  • For example, “Hey chum, want to grab a drink tonight?”
  • One might say, “I’ve known him since we were kids, he’s my oldest chum.”
  • In a group of friends, someone might introduce their chum by saying, “This is my chum, we’ve been through thick and thin together.”

7. Amigo

Amigo is a Spanish word that means friend. It is commonly used in English to refer to a friend or buddy.

  • For instance, “Hey amigo, long time no see!”
  • One might say, “He’s not just my colleague, he’s also my amigo.”
  • When greeting a group of friends, someone might say, “Hola amigos, how’s everyone doing?”

8. Comrade

Comrade is a term that originated in political contexts to refer to a fellow member of a group or organization. It is often used to address someone in a friendly and supportive way.

  • For example, “Good morning, comrade! Ready to tackle the day?”
  • One might say, “We fought together in the war, he’s my comrade.”
  • When discussing a shared goal or mission, someone might say, “We are all comrades working towards the same objective.”

9. Pard

Pard is a slang term derived from “partner” or “pardner” and is used to refer to a friend or companion. It is often used in a casual and familiar way.

  • For instance, “Hey pard, how’s it going?”
  • One might say, “We’ve been pard for years, he’s like a brother to me.”
  • When planning a trip with a friend, someone might say, “Let’s hit the road, pard!”

10. Compadre

Compadre is a Spanish term that translates to “godfather” or “co-father” and is used to refer to a close friend or buddy. It is often used in a warm and affectionate way.

  • For example, “Hey compadre, let’s grab a beer!”
  • One might say, “He’s more than just a coworker, he’s my compadre.”
  • When reminiscing about shared experiences, someone might say, “Those were the days, compadre.”

11. Mucker

This term is often used in Ireland and parts of the UK to refer to a friend or mate. It can also have a slightly informal or affectionate connotation.

  • For example, “Hey, mucker! Let’s grab a pint after work.”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “I’m meeting up with my mucker later.”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my mucker, we go way back.”

12. Cobber

This Australian slang term is used to refer to a close friend or mate. It carries a sense of camaraderie and loyalty.

  • For instance, “G’day, cobber! How’s it going?”
  • In a discussion about a shared experience, someone might say, “Me and my cobber had the best time.”
  • A person might invite their friend by saying, “Wanna come over for a BBQ, cobber?”

13. Bloke

This British slang term is used to refer to a man or guy. It is often used in a casual or friendly manner.

  • For example, “I met this bloke at the pub last night.”
  • In a conversation about a group of friends, someone might say, “We’re just a bunch of blokes hanging out.”
  • A person might describe someone by saying, “He’s a nice bloke, always willing to help.”

14. BFF

This acronym is commonly used in texting and social media to refer to a best friend. It emphasizes a strong and long-lasting friendship.

  • For instance, “Happy birthday to my BFF! Love you, girl!”
  • In a conversation about a close friendship, someone might say, “She’s not just a friend, she’s my BFF.”
  • A person might share a photo with their best friend with the caption, “Me and my BFF, making memories.”

15. Wingman

A wingman is someone who assists and supports another person, typically in a social or dating context. They help the person by providing moral support, engaging in conversation, and potentially helping them attract romantic interest.

  • For example, “I need a wingman tonight, someone to help me approach that person.”
  • In a discussion about dating strategies, someone might say, “Having a good wingman can make all the difference.”
  • A person might ask their friend, “Can you be my wingman tonight? I need some backup.”

16. Sidekick

This term refers to a close friend or companion who is always by your side. It implies a strong bond and loyalty between two individuals.

  • For example, “My sidekick and I have been through thick and thin together.”
  • When talking about a best friend, someone might say, “He’s not just my friend, he’s my sidekick.”
  • In a group of friends, one might jokingly say, “I’m Batman and he’s my trusty sidekick Robin.”

17. Homie G

This slang term is used to refer to a close friend or buddy. “Homie” is a term derived from “homeboy” and “G” is short for “gangsta” or “gangster,” but in this context, it simply means friend.

  • For instance, “Hey, homie G, let’s grab some food.”
  • When greeting a friend, someone might say, “What’s up, homie G?”
  • In a conversation about friendship, one might say, “I’ve known my homie G since we were kids.”

18. Fam

This term is used to refer to someone who is like family or a close friend. It implies a strong bond and familiarity with the person.

  • For example, “He’s not just my friend, he’s fam.”
  • When introducing a close friend to others, one might say, “This is my fam, we go way back.”
  • In a conversation about loyalty, someone might say, “I always have my fam’s back.”

19. Brother from another mother

This phrase is used to describe a close friend who feels like a brother, even though they are not biologically related. It emphasizes the strong bond and connection between the two individuals.

  • For instance, “He’s not my real brother, but he’s my brother from another mother.”
  • When talking about a best friend, someone might say, “He’s more than a friend, he’s like a brother from another mother.”
  • In a conversation about trust, one might say, “I trust my brother from another mother with my life.”

20. Partner in crime

This term refers to a close friend or accomplice with whom one engages in mischievous or adventurous activities. It implies a sense of shared excitement and camaraderie in engaging in such activities.

  • For example, “Me and my partner in crime are always up for some fun.”
  • When discussing a mischievous plan, someone might say, “I need my partner in crime for this.”
  • In a conversation about unforgettable adventures, one might say, “My partner in crime and I have had some crazy experiences together.”

21. Dude

This term is commonly used to refer to a male friend or acquaintance. It can also be used as a general term for addressing someone in a casual or friendly manner.

  • For example, “Hey dude, want to grab a drink later?”
  • Two friends might greet each other by saying, “What’s up, dude?”
  • In a conversation about a shared interest, one person might say, “I met this cool dude at the concert last night.”

22. Bro

This slang term is often used to refer to a close male friend or someone who is like a brother. It can also be used as a casual term of address among friends.

  • For instance, “What’s up, bro? Are you free tonight?”
  • Two friends might say, “Thanks for always having my back, bro.”
  • In a group of friends, one person might ask, “Hey, bro, can you pass the remote?”

23. Homie

This term is commonly used to refer to a close friend or someone from the same neighborhood or community. It is often associated with a sense of camaraderie and loyalty.

  • For example, “I’ve known my homie since we were kids.”
  • Two friends might greet each other by saying, “What’s up, homie?”
  • In a conversation about trust, one person might say, “I can always count on my homies to have my back.”

24. Matey

This term is often used to refer to a friend or companion. It is a friendly and informal way to address someone or talk about a friend.

  • For instance, “Hey matey, how’s it going?”
  • Two friends might say, “Let’s grab a beer, matey.”
  • In a conversation about a shared interest, one person might say, “I’m going to the game with my mateys.”

25. Cohort

This term is often used to refer to a person with whom one shares a common experience or goal, especially in a professional or academic setting. It can also be used to describe a close associate or collaborator.

  • For example, “I work closely with my cohort on this project.”
  • Two colleagues might say, “We make a great cohort, always supporting each other.”
  • In a conversation about teamwork, one person might say, “I’m lucky to have such talented cohorts.”

26. Ally

An ally is someone who supports and stands by you, especially in times of need. It is a term used to describe a close friend or companion.

  • For example, “I can always count on my ally to have my back.”
  • In a group setting, someone might introduce their ally by saying, “This is my best ally, we’ve been friends for years.”
  • A person discussing friendship might say, “Having a loyal ally is important for emotional support.”

27. Acquaintance

An acquaintance is someone you know, but not as well as a close friend. It refers to a person you have met or become familiar with, but may not have a deep personal connection with.

  • For instance, “I bumped into an acquaintance from college at the grocery store.”
  • When introducing someone, you might say, “This is my acquaintance, we’ve met a few times at work.”
  • A person might describe a casual relationship by saying, “We’re just acquaintances, we don’t hang out outside of work.”

28. Playmate

A playmate is someone you engage in playful activities with, such as games or sports. It is a term often used to describe a friend or companion with whom you enjoy recreational activities.

  • For example, “My childhood playmate and I used to spend hours playing board games.”
  • When inviting someone to join in a game, you might say, “Hey, do you want to be my playmate for this round?”
  • A person might reminisce about their childhood by saying, “I had the best playmates growing up, we were always up to some mischief.”

29. Pardner

Pardner is a slang term for “partner,” which refers to someone you work or collaborate with. It can also be used to describe a close friend or companion.

  • For instance, “My pardner and I are starting a business together.”
  • When introducing someone, you might say, “This is my pardner, we’ve been friends since college.”
  • A person might describe a strong bond by saying, “We’re not just friends, we’re pardners in crime.”

30. Crony

A crony is a close friend or companion who is often seen with you. It is a term used to describe someone who is always by your side and shares common interests or goals.

  • For example, “He’s my loyal crony, we’ve been through thick and thin together.”
  • When talking about a dynamic duo, you might say, “Batman and Robin are the perfect example of a superhero crony.”
  • A person might describe a trusted friend by saying, “I can always rely on my crony for advice and support.”

31. Bae

Bae is a term of endearment used to refer to a romantic partner or someone you are attracted to. It stands for “Before Anyone Else” and is often used to express strong affection or love.

  • For example, a person might say, “I can’t wait to see my bae tonight.”
  • In a cute Instagram caption, someone might write, “Out for a date night with my bae ❤️.”
  • A person might text their significant other, “Goodnight, bae. I love you.”
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