Top 89 Slang For Matters – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to staying in the loop with the latest language trends, Slang For Matters is where it’s at. From everyday conversations to social media interactions, knowing the right slang can make all the difference. Join us as we break down some of the most buzzworthy and relevant slang terms that matter in today’s world. Stay ahead of the curve and impress your friends with your newfound linguistic prowess!

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1. Biz

Short for “business,” this term refers to any matter or topic related to work or professional affairs.

  • For example, “Let’s get down to biz and discuss the new project.”
  • A coworker might ask, “What’s the latest biz around the office?”
  • Someone might say, “I’m all about that side biz hustle.”

2. Gig

Used to describe a temporary or part-time job, often in the entertainment or music industry.

  • For instance, “I got a gig playing guitar at a local bar.”
  • A musician might say, “I’m looking for a gig to showcase my new songs.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you have any gig opportunities for a freelance writer?”

3. Deets

Short for “details,” this term refers to specific information or facts about a particular matter or subject.

  • For example, “Can you give me the deets on the upcoming event?”
  • A friend might ask, “What are the deets on that new restaurant?”
  • Someone might say, “I’ll text you the deets for the party tonight.”

4. Scoop

Used to describe exclusive or inside information about a particular matter or topic.

  • For instance, “I’ve got the inside scoop on the new product launch.”
  • A journalist might say, “I need to get the scoop on the latest scandal.”
  • Someone might ask, “What’s the scoop on the new hire in the office?”

5. 411

Derived from the telephone number used to access directory assistance in the United States, this term refers to general information or the latest news on a particular matter.

  • For example, “Give me the 411 on the upcoming concert.”
  • A friend might say, “I need to get the 411 on that new movie.”
  • Someone might ask, “What’s the 411 on the company’s financial performance?”

6. Lowdown

This term refers to important or secret information about a particular situation or topic. It can also mean a summary or explanation of the essential details.

  • For example, “Can you give me the lowdown on what happened at the meeting?”
  • In a discussion about a new product, someone might ask, “What’s the lowdown on its features and pricing?”
  • A journalist might say, “I’ll provide you with the lowdown on the latest political scandal.”

7. Dope

In slang terms, “dope” is used to describe something that is cool, great, or impressive. It can also refer to drugs, but in this context, it means something positive.

  • For instance, “That new movie is dope!”
  • A person might say, “Your outfit is so dope!”
  • Someone might comment, “I just got tickets to the concert. It’s going to be dope!”

8. Tidbits

This word refers to small or interesting pieces of information or details about a particular subject. It can also mean a small and tasty piece of food.

  • For example, “Here are some interesting tidbits about the history of chocolate.”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity, someone might share, “I heard some tidbits about their upcoming album.”
  • A food blogger might write, “Here are some delicious tidbits to try at your next dinner party.”

9. Nitty-gritty

This term refers to the core or essential details of a matter or situation. It often implies getting down to the practical or important aspects.

  • For instance, “Let’s skip the small talk and get to the nitty-gritty.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “We need to focus on the nitty-gritty to meet our deadline.”
  • A manager might ask, “Have you considered all the nitty-gritty details before presenting the proposal?”

10. Ins and Outs

This phrase refers to the complete or comprehensive understanding of a subject or situation, including all the details and intricacies.

  • For example, “I know the ins and outs of this industry.”
  • In a conversation about a complex process, someone might say, “Let me explain the ins and outs of how it works.”
  • A teacher might ask, “Do you understand the ins and outs of this math concept?”

11. Rundown

A concise and brief explanation or summary of something. “Rundown” is often used to quickly convey the main points or important details of a topic.

  • For example, in a meeting, someone might say, “Can you give me a rundown of the project?”
  • In a news article, the author might provide a rundown of the key events that led to a certain situation.
  • A friend might ask, “Can you give me a rundown of what happened at the party last night?”

12. Gist

The main or essential part of something. “Gist” refers to the central idea or the core meaning of a matter or conversation.

  • For instance, in a long discussion, someone might say, “Can you give me the gist of what they were talking about?”
  • In a book review, the reviewer might provide the gist of the plot without giving away too many details.
  • A teacher might ask the students to summarize the gist of a complex text.

13. Skinny

This term is used to refer to the inside scoop or the latest information on a matter. “Skinny” often implies that the information is exclusive or not widely known.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Give me the skinny on what happened at the party last night.”
  • In a news article, the journalist might claim to have the skinny on a scandalous event.
  • A gossip magazine might promise to provide readers with all the skinny on the latest celebrity relationships.

14. Brass tacks

The basic or essential elements of a matter. “Brass tacks” is often used to refer to getting down to the important or practical details.

  • For instance, in a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s get down to brass tacks and discuss the budget.”
  • In a negotiation, one party might say, “Enough with the small talk, let’s get down to brass tacks.”
  • A teacher might ask the students to focus on the brass tacks of a complex problem before attempting to solve it.

15. Dirt

Confidential or scandalous information about a matter or person. “Dirt” is often used to refer to hidden or unknown details that may change one’s perception of something.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I’ve got the dirt on the politician’s shady dealings.”
  • In a celebrity gossip magazine, the headline might read, “We’ve uncovered the dirt on the star’s troubled past.”
  • A friend might say, “Spill the dirt! What happened between you and your ex?”

16. Juice

In slang, “juice” refers to information or power. It can be used to describe having inside information or being influential.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve got the juice on that new restaurant opening next week.”
  • In a conversation about politics, a person might say, “He’s got the juice to make things happen.”
  • Another usage could be, “She’s always in the know, she’s got the juice.”

17. Intel

“Intel” is a slang term for information or intelligence. It is commonly used in casual conversation to refer to inside information or knowledge.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Do you have any intel on the new project?”
  • In a discussion about a secret event, a person might say, “I’ve got some intel on the surprise guest.”
  • Another usage could be, “I need some intel on the competition before the meeting.”

18. 4-1-1

In slang, “4-1-1” is used to refer to information or details about a particular topic. It is often used to ask for or provide information.

  • For example, someone might ask, “Can you give me the 4-1-1 on that new movie?”
  • In a conversation about a party, a person might say, “I’ll give you the 4-1-1 on the location and time.”
  • Another usage could be, “I need the 4-1-1 on the meeting agenda.”

19. Word

In slang, “word” is used to refer to information or news. It is often used to express agreement or confirmation.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Hey, I’ve got some word on the upcoming concert.”
  • In a conversation about a rumor, a person might say, “Is the word true about the new product launch?”
  • Another usage could be, “Word has it that they’re dating.”

20. Affair

In slang, “affair” is used to refer to a matter or situation. It can be used to describe a specific event or topic of interest.

  • For example, someone might say, “What’s the affair with the new company policy?”
  • In a conversation about a scandal, a person might say, “The affair with the politician is causing a lot of controversy.”
  • Another usage could be, “Let’s discuss the current affairs in the entertainment industry.”

21. Issue

This term refers to a specific problem, concern, or topic that is being discussed or debated.

  • For example, “The issue of climate change is a pressing matter that needs immediate attention.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “I disagree with the candidate’s stance on key issues.”
  • A person might bring up an issue in a conversation by saying, “There’s an important issue that we need to address.”

22. Thing

In slang, “thing” can be used as a general term to refer to an object, concept, or idea that is not specified or easily described.

  • For instance, “Pass me that thing on the table.”
  • In a conversation about a complicated topic, someone might say, “You know, that thing we were talking about earlier.”
  • A person might use “thing” to describe something they can’t quite remember by saying,“thing” to describe something they can’t quite remember by saying, “What’s the name of that thing? You know, the thingamajig.”

23. Topic

This term refers to a specific subject or theme that is being discussed or explored.

  • For example, “The topic of today’s meeting is marketing strategies.”
  • In a classroom setting, a teacher might say, “Our next topic of study is the American Revolution.”
  • A person might bring up a topic in a conversation by saying, “Have you heard about the latest topic in the news?”

24. Case

In slang, “case” can refer to a specific instance or situation that is being discussed or analyzed.

  • For instance, “Let’s look at the case of the missing car keys.”
  • In a legal context, someone might say, “The prosecution presented a strong case against the defendant.”
  • A person might use “case” to describe a particular scenario by saying,“case” to describe a particular scenario by saying, “In case you were wondering, this is how it happened.”

25. Point

This term refers to the main idea or argument that is being made or discussed.

  • For example, “The speaker made several valid points during the presentation.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I disagree with your point about gun control.”
  • A person might use “point” to emphasize a key idea by saying,“point” to emphasize a key idea by saying, “The point is, we need to take action now.”

26. Element

This refers to a specific component or aspect of something. It can be used to describe various factors that make up a whole.

  • For example, in a recipe, a cook might say, “Salt is a key element in this dish.”
  • In a discussion about music, someone might comment, “The guitar solo is the standout element of this song.”
  • A designer might say, “The color scheme is an important element of the overall aesthetic.”

27. Factor

This refers to something that contributes to a result or outcome. It can be used to describe various variables that affect a situation.

  • For instance, in a study on health, a researcher might say, “Genetics is a significant factor in determining susceptibility to certain diseases.”
  • In a discussion about success, someone might comment, “Hard work is a key factor in achieving one’s goals.”
  • A sports analyst might say, “Home-field advantage can be a determining factor in the outcome of a game.”

28. Detail

This refers to a small or specific piece of information or aspect of something. It can be used to emphasize the importance of paying attention to the specifics.

  • For example, in a detective story, a character might say, “Pay attention to the details; they often hold the key to solving the mystery.”
  • In a discussion about a painting, someone might comment, “The brushstrokes and color choices are exquisite details.”
  • A project manager might say, “It’s important to focus on the details to ensure the project’s success.”

29. Event

This refers to a specific happening or occurrence, often with a social or cultural significance. It can be used to describe various gatherings or happenings.

  • For instance, in a wedding invitation, it might say, “Join us for the joyous event of our marriage.”
  • In a discussion about history, someone might comment, “The signing of the Declaration of Independence was a pivotal event.”
  • A party planner might say, “We’re organizing a special event to celebrate the company’s anniversary.”

30. Circumstance

This refers to the conditions or factors that surround and influence a particular event or situation. It can be used to describe various scenarios or conditions.

  • For example, in a legal context, a lawyer might say, “The defendant’s financial circumstances should be taken into account.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might comment, “Trust is crucial in any circumstance.”
  • A business consultant might say, “In this economic circumstance, it’s important to adapt and find new opportunities.”

31. Occasion

This term refers to a specific event or happening, often with a special or significant purpose or meaning.

  • For example, “We’re celebrating a special occasion tonight with a fancy dinner.”
  • In a discussion about parties, someone might say, “I love dressing up for special occasions.”
  • Another might mention, “It’s the perfect occasion to show off my new dance moves.”

32. Situation

This word is used to describe a set of circumstances or conditions that someone is facing.

  • For instance, “I’m in a tricky situation and not sure what to do.”
  • In a conversation about work, someone might say, “I’m dealing with a difficult situation with my boss.”
  • Another might ask, “How would you handle this situation if you were in my shoes?”

33. Scenario

A scenario refers to a possible situation or sequence of events that could occur.

  • For example, “Let’s consider a hypothetical scenario where we have unlimited resources.”
  • In a discussion about disaster preparedness, someone might say, “We need to plan for worst-case scenarios.”
  • Another might ask, “What would you do in this scenario if you were the main character?”

34. Dilemma

A dilemma describes a difficult choice between two options, often with no clear or easy solution.

  • For instance, “I’m in a dilemma because both options have advantages and disadvantages.”
  • In a conversation about career decisions, someone might say, “I’m facing a dilemma between staying at my current job or pursuing a new opportunity.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you help me solve this dilemma? I can’t decide which path to take.”

35. Predicament

A predicament refers to a difficult or challenging situation that someone finds themselves in.

  • For example, “I’m in a predicament because I accidentally locked myself out of my house.”
  • In a discussion about financial struggles, someone might say, “Many people are facing predicaments due to the current economic situation.”
  • Another might ask, “How did you get yourself into this predicament? Is there any way to fix it?”

36. Controversy

A disagreement or argument that is often public and involves differing opinions or viewpoints. Controversies can arise in various fields such as politics, entertainment, or social issues.

  • For example, a news headline might read, “Controversy surrounds new government policy.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “There’s a lot of controversy surrounding the use of genetically modified organisms.”
  • A person might express their opinion by stating, “I understand the controversy, but I believe this decision is for the greater good.”

37. Dispute

A disagreement or conflict between two or more parties. Disputes can arise over various matters, such as money, property, or differing opinions.

  • For instance, a couple might have a dispute over household chores.
  • In a legal context, a lawyer might say, “We are currently in a dispute over the ownership of the property.”
  • A person might try to resolve a dispute by saying, “Let’s sit down and talk calmly to resolve this dispute.”

38. Conflict

A serious disagreement or struggle between two or more parties. Conflicts can occur on personal, social, or international levels and often involve opposing interests or goals.

  • For example, a conflict might arise between two countries over territorial boundaries.
  • In a workplace setting, a manager might say, “We need to address the conflict between the two teams.”
  • A person might try to mediate a conflict by saying, “Let’s find a compromise that satisfies both parties.”

39. Debate

A formal or informal argument or discussion in which opposing viewpoints are presented and analyzed. Debates often occur in academic or political settings and aim to persuade others or reach a consensus.

  • For instance, a debate might take place in a classroom about the benefits and drawbacks of social media.
  • In a political context, a candidate might say, “I look forward to the upcoming debate to present my ideas.”
  • A person might engage in a debate by stating, “I disagree with your viewpoint, and here’s why.”

40. Question

An inquiry or doubt about a particular subject or matter. Questions can be asked to seek information, clarification, or to challenge assumptions.

  • For example, a student might raise their hand to ask a question during a lecture.
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might pose a thought-provoking question like, “What are the ethical implications of this decision?”
  • A person might express their curiosity by saying, “I have a question about how this process works.”

41. Query

A query is a question or inquiry about something.

  • For example, “I have a query about the new company policy.”
  • In a customer service setting, a representative might ask, “How can I assist you? Do you have any queries?”
  • A student might approach a teacher and say, “I have a query about the assignment.”

42. Concern

A concern is something that causes worry or anxiety.

  • For instance, “My biggest concern is the upcoming deadline.”
  • In a relationship, one partner might express, “I have a concern about our communication.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Your safety is my main concern.”

43. Trouble

Trouble refers to a problem or difficulty.

  • For example, “I’m having trouble understanding this concept.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “We’re in trouble if we don’t meet the deadline.”
  • A person experiencing car issues might say, “I’m having trouble starting my car.”

44. Challenge

A challenge is a difficult task or situation that tests one’s abilities.

  • For instance, “Running a marathon is a great challenge.”
  • In a team setting, a leader might say, “This project will be a challenge, but I believe in our abilities.”
  • A person trying to quit smoking might say, “Giving up cigarettes is a challenge, but I’m determined to succeed.”

45. Obstacle

An obstacle is something that stands in the way of progress or achievement.

  • For example, “Lack of funding is a major obstacle for our project.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “We need to overcome these obstacles to win the game.”
  • A person facing personal challenges might say, “I’m determined to overcome every obstacle in my path.”

46. Barrier

A barrier refers to something that blocks or hinders progress or movement. It can be a physical object or an abstract concept that creates difficulty in achieving a goal.

  • For example, “Language barrier” refers to the difficulty in communicating with someone who doesn’t speak the same language.
  • In a discussion about achieving success, someone might say, “Don’t let fear become a barrier to your dreams.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The team needs to overcome the defensive barrier in order to score.”

47. Hurdle

A hurdle is an obstacle or difficulty that needs to be overcome in order to achieve a goal or make progress. It can refer to both physical and metaphorical barriers.

  • For instance, in a race, athletes need to jump over physical hurdles to reach the finish line.
  • In a discussion about starting a business, someone might say, “The first hurdle is securing funding.”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “Don’t let setbacks become hurdles on your path to success.”

48. Snag

A snag refers to a small problem or difficulty that arises unexpectedly and causes a delay or disruption. It can also refer to a hidden or unexpected obstacle.

  • For example, “I hit a snag when my car broke down on the way to work.”
  • In a discussion about planning a wedding, someone might say, “We encountered a snag when the venue double-booked.”
  • A project manager might say, “We need to address this snag before it becomes a major issue.”

49. Hitch

A hitch refers to a minor problem or obstacle that causes a delay or disruption. It can also refer to a temporary difficulty or setback.

  • For instance, “We hit a hitch when the printer ran out of ink.”
  • In a discussion about organizing an event, someone might say, “We had a hitch with the catering, but it was quickly resolved.”
  • A team leader might say, “Let’s address any hitches early on to avoid bigger problems down the line.”

50. Jam

Jam refers to a difficult situation or problem that is challenging to resolve. It can also refer to a tight or crowded space where movement is restricted.

  • For example, “I’m in a jam because I forgot my wallet at home.”
  • In a discussion about traffic, someone might say, “I got stuck in a jam on the highway.”
  • A musician might say, “We had to improvise when we got into a jam during the performance.”

51. Pickle

This slang term is often used to describe a problem or predicament that someone finds themselves in.

  • For example, “I got myself into a pickle when I accidentally locked my keys in the car.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in a bit of a pickle because I forgot to finish my assignment.”
  • Someone might ask for help with a problem by saying, “I’m in a pickle and I don’t know how to solve it.”

52. Fix

In slang terms, “fix” refers to finding a solution or resolving an issue.

  • For instance, “I need to fix this leaky faucet before it causes more damage.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll fix the problem by contacting customer support.”
  • Someone might ask for assistance by saying, “Can you help me fix this broken computer?”

53. Solution

When used in slang, “solution” refers to an answer or resolution to a problem or challenge.

  • For example, “I finally found a solution to my math equation.”
  • A person might say, “The solution to this issue is clear: we need better communication.”
  • Someone might ask for suggestions by saying, “I’m looking for solutions to improve my productivity.”

54. Answer

In slang terms, “answer” refers to a response or solution to a question or problem.

  • For instance, “I need an answer to this riddle.”
  • A person might say, “The answer to your question is yes.”
  • Someone might ask for clarification by saying, “Can you give me a straight answer?”

55. Response

When used in slang, “response” refers to a reply or reaction to something.

  • For example, “I’m still waiting for a response to my email.”
  • A person might say, “His response to the joke was hilarious.”
  • Someone might ask for feedback by saying, “What’s your response to my idea?”

56. Reply

A reply is a response to a message or a comment, usually in a conversation or discussion. It is a way to engage with others and continue the conversation.

  • For example, “Thanks for your reply, I appreciate your input.”
  • In a forum thread, a user might ask, “Can you reply to my question?”
  • Someone might reply to a comment with, “I agree with your point.”

57. Feedback

Feedback refers to providing opinions, suggestions, or comments on someone’s work or performance. It is often given to help improve and enhance the quality of something.

  • For instance, “I appreciate your feedback on my presentation.”
  • A user might ask for feedback by saying, “Please give me your feedback on this design.”
  • Someone might provide feedback by saying, “I think your article is well-written, but it could use more examples.”

58. Input

Input refers to sharing one’s opinion or suggestion on a particular matter. It is a way to contribute to a discussion or decision-making process.

  • For example, “I value your input on this issue.”
  • In a brainstorming session, someone might say, “Let’s get everyone’s input on this topic.”
  • A user might ask for input by saying, “What’s your input on this new feature?”

59. Contribution

Contribution refers to actively participating or being involved in a particular matter. It can be in the form of ideas, efforts, or resources.

  • For instance, “Thank you for your contribution to the project.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might say, “We need everyone’s contribution to make this initiative successful.”
  • A user might encourage others to contribute by saying, “Please feel free to contribute your thoughts and suggestions.”

60. Insight

Insight refers to having a deep understanding or knowledge about a particular matter. It often involves gaining unique or valuable perspectives.

  • For example, “Your insight into this issue is very helpful.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “I gained new insights from reading this article.”
  • A user might share their insight by saying, “Based on my experience, here’s some insight on the topic.”

61. Understanding

When you have a good grasp of a concept or situation.

  • For example, “I finally have an understanding of how to solve this math problem.”
  • In a discussion about a complex topic, someone might say, “I’m still trying to gain a better understanding of the issue.”
  • A teacher might ask their students, “Do you all have an understanding of the material we just covered?”

62. Comprehension

When you fully understand or grasp something.

  • For instance, “I read the book twice to ensure full comprehension of the story.”
  • In a classroom, a teacher might ask, “Does everyone have comprehension of the material?”
  • A person explaining a complicated concept might say, “Let me break it down so you can have a better comprehension.”

63. Grasp

To understand or comprehend something.

  • For example, “It took me a while, but I finally grasped the concept.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult topic, someone might say, “I’m struggling to grasp the intricacies of the issue.”
  • A teacher might check for understanding by asking, “Do you all grasp the concept I just explained?”

64. Clue

A small piece of information that helps you understand or solve something.

  • For instance, “Can you give me a clue about the answer to this riddle?”
  • In a game, someone might say, “I need a hint to figure out the next puzzle.”
  • A person trying to solve a mystery might ask, “Does anyone have any clues about who the culprit might be?”

65. Hint

A subtle clue or indication that helps you figure something out.

  • For example, “She dropped a hint about where she was going for her birthday.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I got a hint that there might be a surprise party for me.”
  • A detective might say, “The suspect’s behavior gave me a hint that they were involved in the crime.”

66. Tip

A tip is a helpful piece of advice or suggestion, often given to improve a situation or solve a problem.

  • For example, “Here’s a tip: always double-check your work before submitting it.”
  • In a conversation about cooking, someone might share, “I have a great tip for making the perfect omelette.”
  • A traveler might offer the tip, “If you’re visiting a foreign country, learn a few basic phrases in the local language. It goes a long way!”

67. Suggestion

A suggestion is an idea or proposal put forward for consideration or action. It is often given to offer an alternative or provide guidance.

  • For instance, “I have a suggestion: let’s meet at a different restaurant tonight.”
  • In a brainstorming session, someone might say, “I have a suggestion for improving our marketing strategy.”
  • A friend might offer the suggestion, “You should try that new bakery in town. It’s amazing!”

68. Recommendation

A recommendation is a formal or informal statement suggesting that something is good or suitable for a particular purpose.

  • For example, “I have a recommendation for a great book you should read.”
  • In a discussion about movies, someone might say, “I have a recommendation for a must-watch film.”
  • A colleague might give the recommendation, “I highly recommend this new software. It has improved our productivity.”

69. Big deal

“Big deal” is an informal expression used to emphasize the importance or significance of something.

  • For instance, “So what if I made a mistake? It’s not a big deal.”
  • In a conversation about achievements, someone might say, “Winning that award was a big deal for me.”
  • A parent might reassure their child, “Don’t worry about the small stuff. Focus on the big deals in life.”

70. Serious business

“Serious business” is a colloquial phrase used to indicate that something is important or needs to be taken seriously.

  • For example, “We need to discuss this issue. It’s serious business.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “Marriage is serious business. It requires commitment and effort.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Pay attention, class. This lesson is serious business.”

71. Critical issue

A critical issue refers to a matter or problem that is of great importance and requires immediate attention or action. It is a term used to emphasize the seriousness or urgency of a particular matter.

  • For example, “The lack of clean drinking water in certain areas is a critical issue that needs to be addressed.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “The melting of polar ice caps is a critical issue that will have far-reaching consequences.”
  • A politician might state, “The rising crime rate in our city is a critical issue that demands immediate action.”

72. Major concern

A major concern refers to a matter or issue that is of significant importance or worry. It is a term used to highlight the significance or impact of a particular matter.

  • For instance, “The increasing rates of unemployment are a major concern for the government.”
  • In a conversation about public health, someone might express, “The spread of infectious diseases is a major concern for global health organizations.”
  • A parent might say, “The safety of our children is a major concern that we need to address.”

73. Significant affair

A significant affair refers to an important matter or event that holds significance or importance. It is a term used to emphasize the importance or relevance of a particular matter.

  • For example, “The upcoming election is a significant affair that will shape the future of our country.”
  • In a discussion about education, someone might state, “The quality of education is a significant affair that affects the development of individuals and society.”
  • A business executive might say, “The merger of two companies is a significant affair that will impact the industry.”

74. Vital topic

A vital topic refers to a crucial or essential subject that holds great importance or significance. It is a term used to highlight the critical nature or relevance of a particular matter.

  • For instance, “Climate change is a vital topic that requires immediate action to mitigate its effects.”
  • In a conversation about healthcare, someone might express, “Access to affordable healthcare is a vital topic that needs to be addressed.”
  • A researcher might state, “The study of renewable energy sources is a vital topic in the field of environmental science.”

75. Urgent matter

An urgent matter refers to a pressing or immediate issue that requires immediate attention or action. It is a term used to emphasize the need for prompt action or resolution of a particular matter.

  • For example, “The outbreak of a contagious disease is an urgent matter that requires swift response from healthcare authorities.”
  • In a discussion about public safety, someone might say, “The rising crime rates in certain neighborhoods are urgent matters that need to be addressed.”
  • A manager might state, “The deadline for the project is approaching, and it is an urgent matter that we complete it on time.”

76. Crucial issue

This term refers to a matter or problem that is of great significance or importance. It emphasizes the seriousness and urgency of the issue.

  • For example, in a political debate, one might say, “Climate change is a crucial issue that requires immediate attention.”
  • In a business context, a manager might address their team by stating, “Let’s discuss the crucial issues affecting our company’s growth.”
  • A news headline might read, “Government faces crucial issues in healthcare reform.”

77. Essential matter

This slang term is used to describe a matter or concern that is of utmost importance or significance. It highlights the essential nature of the subject.

  • For instance, in a legal discussion, one might argue, “The protection of civil liberties is an essential matter in our society.”
  • In a personal conversation, someone might say, “Family is the essential matter in my life.”
  • A teacher might emphasize to their students, “Understanding the essential matters covered in this course is crucial for your success.”

78. Pressing concern

This slang phrase refers to a matter or issue that requires immediate attention or action. It conveys a sense of urgency or importance.

  • For example, during a crisis, a government official might state, “Addressing the pressing concerns of the affected population is our top priority.”
  • In a healthcare setting, a doctor might note, “The patient’s deteriorating condition is a pressing concern that needs immediate intervention.”
  • A student might express their stress by saying, “Preparing for the upcoming exams is my most pressing concern right now.”

79. Key point

This term is used to highlight a specific and important aspect of a matter or topic. It emphasizes the significance of the point being made.

  • For instance, in a debate, one might say, “Let me summarize the key points of my argument.”
  • In a business presentation, a speaker might state, “The key point to remember is that customer satisfaction drives our success.”
  • A teacher might ask their students, “Can anyone identify the key points in this historical event?”

80. Main focus

This slang term refers to the primary or central aspect of a matter or topic. It denotes the main area of attention or concentration.

  • For example, in a project meeting, a team leader might state, “The main focus of our efforts should be on improving customer experience.”
  • In a personal development workshop, a facilitator might ask, “What is your main focus for personal growth this year?”
  • A journalist might write, “The main focus of the article is to shed light on the impact of social media on mental health.”

81. Essential issue

This refers to a matter or topic that is of utmost importance or significance. An essential issue is something that cannot be overlooked or ignored.

  • For example, in a team meeting, someone might say, “Let’s focus on the essential issues first.”
  • In a political debate, a candidate might highlight, “The essential issue we need to address is healthcare.”
  • A news article might discuss, “The essential issues facing the education system today.”

82. Urgent issue

An urgent issue is a matter that requires immediate attention or action. It is something that cannot be delayed or postponed.

  • For instance, during a crisis, a leader might say, “We need to address this urgent issue right away.”
  • In a business setting, a manager might emphasize, “The urgent issue at hand is meeting our sales targets.”
  • A community organizer might rally support for, “Solving the urgent issue of homelessness in our city.”

83. Major topic

A major topic is a subject that is of great importance or interest. It is a matter that carries significant weight or impact.

  • For example, in a college course, a professor might say, “Today, we will discuss the major topics of the Renaissance.”
  • In a political debate, a candidate might argue, “The major topic of this election is economic reform.”
  • A news headline might read, “Scientists make breakthrough in major topic of climate change.”

84. Main concern

The main concern refers to the primary or most important matter that someone is worried or focused on. It is the matter that takes precedence over others.

  • For instance, in a healthcare setting, a doctor might ask, “What is your main concern today?”
  • In a relationship, one partner might express, “My main concern is trust and honesty.”
  • A parent might discuss, “My main concern is ensuring my child’s safety and well-being.”

85. Core topic

A core topic is the central or fundamental subject of discussion or study. It is the main focus or theme.

  • For example, in a literature class, a teacher might say, “The core topic of this novel is identity.”
  • In a business presentation, a speaker might highlight, “Let’s delve into the core topic of our marketing strategy.”
  • A researcher might state, “The core topic of my study is the effects of climate change on biodiversity.”

86. Key matter

This term refers to a matter or topic that holds significant importance or relevance.

  • For example, in a team meeting, someone might say, “Let’s discuss the key matters that need to be addressed.”
  • In a political debate, a candidate might argue, “The key matter at hand is the economy and job creation.”
  • A teacher might remind students, “Pay attention to the key matters discussed in today’s lecture.”

87. Critical topic

This term is used to describe a topic or issue that is of utmost importance or has a significant impact.

  • For instance, a news headline might read, “Scientists warn of critical topics in climate change.”
  • During a brainstorming session, someone might say, “Let’s focus on critical topics that require immediate attention.”
  • A manager might address the team, saying, “We need to prioritize critical topics to ensure the success of our project.”

88. Significant issue

This term refers to an issue or problem that holds considerable importance or significance.

  • For example, in a political campaign, a candidate might address significant issues like healthcare and education.
  • During a town hall meeting, a citizen might raise their hand and say, “I have a question about a significant issue affecting our community.”
  • A teacher might assign a research project on significant issues in history and ask students to present their findings.
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89. Essential topic

This term is used to describe a topic or subject that is absolutely necessary or crucial.

  • For instance, in a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s focus on essential topics that directly impact our bottom line.”
  • In a classroom discussion, a student might ask, “Can you clarify the essential topics we need to understand for the exam?”
  • A conference speaker might emphasize, “It’s important to address essential topics to drive innovation and progress.”