Top 85 Slang For Medical – Meaning & Usage

Medical jargon can often sound like a foreign language, leaving many scratching their heads. But fear not, we’ve got you covered! Our team has delved into the world of healthcare to bring you a curated list of the top slang terms used in the medical field. Get ready to learn some new lingo and impress your friends with your newfound medical knowledge!

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1. Doc

This term is a shortened form of “doctor” and is often used to refer to a medical professional. It can be used to address or describe a physician.

  • For example, “I need to see my doc for a check-up.”
  • In a conversation about healthcare, someone might say, “My doc recommended I start taking medication.”
  • Another person might ask, “Do you know a good doc in the area?”

2. Rx

This abbreviation stands for “prescription” and is commonly used to refer to a written order from a healthcare provider for medication or treatment.

  • For instance, “I need to pick up my Rx from the pharmacy.”
  • In a discussion about medication, someone might say, “I have a few different Rxs to manage my conditions.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you read the dosage on this Rx for me?”

3. ICU

This acronym refers to the Intensive Care Unit, which is a specialized hospital department that provides critical care treatment for patients with life-threatening conditions.

  • For example, “My relative is in the ICU after a serious accident.”
  • In a conversation about healthcare facilities, someone might ask, “Does this hospital have an ICU?”
  • A healthcare professional might say, “We need to transfer the patient to the ICU for closer monitoring.”

4. ER

This abbreviation stands for the Emergency Room, which is a department in a hospital where people with acute illnesses or injuries receive immediate medical attention.

  • For instance, “I had to go to the ER after a car accident.”
  • In a discussion about healthcare services, someone might ask, “Is there an ER nearby?”
  • A person might say, “I’m experiencing chest pain. Should I go to the ER?”

5. OTC

This acronym refers to medications or products that can be purchased without a prescription, directly from a pharmacy or store.

  • For example, “I need to buy some OTC pain relievers for my headache.”
  • In a conversation about healthcare, someone might ask, “Do you know if this medication is available OTC?”
  • A person might say, “OTC products are convenient for treating minor ailments.”

6. MRI

A medical imaging technique that uses a magnetic field and radio waves to generate detailed images of the organs and tissues within the body.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “We need to schedule an MRI to get a better look at your knee.”
  • A patient might ask, “Will I need to remove any metal objects before the MRI?”
  • A radiologist might report, “The MRI revealed a small tumor in the patient’s brain.”

7. CT Scan

A medical imaging procedure that uses a combination of X-rays and a computer to create detailed cross-sectional images of the body.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “We need to perform a CT scan to determine the cause of your abdominal pain.”
  • A patient might ask, “Is a CT scan safe? Will it expose me to a lot of radiation?”
  • A radiologist might comment, “The CT scan showed a fracture in the patient’s right arm.”

8. EKG

A test that measures the electrical activity of the heart to evaluate its health and detect any abnormalities.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “We need to do an EKG to check your heart’s rhythm.”
  • A patient might ask, “Will the EKG show if I’ve had a heart attack before?”
  • A cardiologist might explain, “The EKG provides valuable information about the heart’s electrical system.”

9. BP

A measurement of the force exerted by the blood against the walls of the arteries. It is often expressed as two numbers, with the systolic pressure (top number) over the diastolic pressure (bottom number).

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “Your BP is a bit high. We’ll need to monitor it.”
  • A patient might ask, “What’s a normal BP reading?”
  • A nurse might report, “The patient’s BP is 120/80, which is within the normal range.”

10. IV

A method of delivering fluids, medications, or nutrients directly into a vein through a tube or catheter.

  • For example, a nurse might say, “We’ll start an IV to administer the medication.”
  • A patient might ask, “Will the IV hurt?”
  • A doctor might order, “Give the patient IV fluids to rehydrate them.”

11. OR

This refers to the specialized room in a hospital or surgical center where surgical procedures are performed. The OR is equipped with surgical instruments, anesthesia equipment, and monitoring devices.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “The patient is being prepped for surgery in the OR.”
  • A nurse might inform a family member, “Your loved one is currently in the OR undergoing a procedure.”
  • A surgeon might request, “Please bring the patient to the OR immediately for an emergency surgery.”

12. PT

PT is an abbreviation for physical therapy, which is a branch of rehabilitative healthcare. Physical therapists help patients regain mobility, strength, and function after an injury or illness.

  • For instance, a doctor might prescribe, “The patient needs to start PT to recover from the knee surgery.”
  • A patient might say, “I’ve been going to PT for a month now, and I’m starting to feel stronger.”
  • A physical therapist might explain, “In PT, we use exercises and manual techniques to improve range of motion and reduce pain.”

13. OT

OT is short for occupational therapy, which focuses on helping individuals develop or regain the skills needed for daily activities and work. Occupational therapists work with patients of all ages and conditions.

  • For example, a parent might say, “My child is receiving OT to improve their fine motor skills.”
  • A therapist might suggest, “OT can help you adapt your home environment to make daily tasks easier.”
  • A patient might share, “I’ve been going to OT to learn strategies for managing my chronic pain.”

14. GI

GI is an abbreviation for gastrointestinal, which refers to the digestive system. It includes organs such as the stomach, intestines, liver, and pancreas.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “The patient is experiencing GI distress after eating a spicy meal.”
  • A nurse might document, “The patient’s GI symptoms have improved since starting the medication.”
  • A person might complain, “I’ve been having GI issues for weeks, and I can’t figure out what’s causing it.”

15. ENT

ENT is an abbreviation for ear, nose, and throat, which is a medical specialty that focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of conditions affecting these areas. ENT doctors, also known as otolaryngologists, treat issues such as hearing loss, sinusitis, and throat infections.

  • For example, a parent might say, “My child needs to see an ENT because they have recurring ear infections.”
  • A doctor might recommend, “You should schedule an appointment with an ENT if you’re experiencing chronic nasal congestion.”
  • A patient might share, “The ENT performed a tonsillectomy to address my frequent sore throats.”

16. OB/GYN

This is a medical specialist who focuses on women’s reproductive health, including pregnancy, childbirth, and the female reproductive system. The term “OB/GYN” is an abbreviation for “obstetrician/gynecologist”.

  • For example, a woman might say, “I need to schedule an appointment with my OB/GYN for my annual check-up.”
  • In a conversation about childbirth, someone might ask, “Did you have a midwife or an OB/GYN for your delivery?”
  • A doctor might say, “I specialize in high-risk pregnancies, so I work closely with OB/GYNs to ensure the best care for my patients.”

17. PCP

This refers to the doctor who provides basic medical care and serves as the main point of contact for a patient’s healthcare needs. “PCP” is an abbreviation for “primary care physician”.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to make an appointment with my PCP for a check-up.”
  • In a discussion about healthcare, someone might ask, “Do you have a PCP that you see regularly?”
  • A doctor might say, “As a PCP, my goal is to provide comprehensive care and help my patients manage their overall health.”

18. CCU

This is a specialized hospital unit that provides intensive care and monitoring for patients with severe heart conditions, such as heart attacks or heart failure. “CCU” is an abbreviation for “coronary care unit”.

  • For example, a nurse might say, “We need to transfer this patient to the CCU for closer monitoring.”
  • In a discussion about cardiac care, someone might ask, “What’s the difference between the CCU and the ICU?”
  • A doctor might say, “I specialize in cardiology and spend most of my time in the CCU, treating patients with heart conditions.”

19. NICU

This is a specialized hospital unit that provides intensive care and monitoring for newborn babies who are born prematurely or with serious medical conditions. “NICU” is an abbreviation for “neonatal intensive care unit”.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “My baby is in the NICU because she was born prematurely.”
  • In a discussion about childbirth, someone might ask, “What are the criteria for a baby to be admitted to the NICU?”
  • A nurse might say, “Working in the NICU requires specialized training and a deep understanding of neonatal care.”

20. PICU

This is a specialized hospital unit that provides intensive care and monitoring for critically ill children. “PICU” is an abbreviation for “pediatric intensive care unit”.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “We need to transfer this patient to the PICU for more specialized care.”
  • In a discussion about pediatric medicine, someone might ask, “What types of patients are typically admitted to the PICU?”
  • A nurse might say, “Working in the PICU can be emotionally challenging but incredibly rewarding, as we help save the lives of critically ill children.”

21. Lab

Short for laboratory, a facility where scientific research, experiments, and tests are conducted. In a medical context, a lab refers to a department or room where medical tests and analyses are performed.

  • For example, a doctor might order a lab test to check a patient’s blood glucose levels.
  • A nurse might say, “I need to collect a blood sample and send it to the lab for analysis.”
  • A medical student might discuss their experiences in the lab, saying, “I spent hours in the lab learning how to perform various tests and interpret the results.”

22. X-ray

A type of imaging technique that uses electromagnetic radiation to create images of the inside of the body. X-rays are commonly used to diagnose and monitor various medical conditions.

  • For instance, a doctor might order an X-ray to assess a patient’s broken bone.
  • A radiologist might discuss the findings from an X-ray, saying, “The X-ray revealed a fracture in the patient’s wrist.”
  • A patient might ask, “Do I need to remove my jewelry before getting an X-ray?”

23. PPE

Items worn or used by healthcare professionals to protect themselves and patients from potential hazards and infections. PPE includes items such as gloves, masks, gowns, and goggles.

  • For example, during the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers are required to wear PPE to prevent the spread of the virus.
  • A nurse might say, “I need to put on my PPE before entering the patient’s room.”
  • A doctor might discuss the importance of proper PPE usage, saying, “Wearing appropriate PPE is crucial in reducing the risk of exposure to infectious diseases.”

24. HMO

A type of healthcare insurance plan that requires members to choose a primary care physician (PCP) and obtain referrals for specialist care. HMOs typically have a network of healthcare providers that members must use to receive full coverage.

  • For instance, an individual might say, “I have an HMO insurance plan, so I need to see my PCP before seeing a specialist.”
  • A doctor might explain to a patient, “With an HMO, you’ll need to choose a primary care physician who will coordinate your healthcare.”
  • A healthcare administrator might discuss the benefits of HMOs, saying, “HMOs can help control healthcare costs by promoting preventive care and managing referrals.”

25. EHR

A digital version of a patient’s medical history, including information such as diagnoses, medications, test results, and treatment plans. EHRs are designed to improve the efficiency and accuracy of healthcare delivery.

  • For example, a doctor might access a patient’s EHR to review their medical history before a visit.
  • A nurse might enter new information into a patient’s EHR, saying, “I need to update the EHR with the latest vital signs.”
  • A healthcare IT specialist might discuss the benefits of EHRs, saying, “EHRs allow for seamless sharing of patient information among healthcare providers, leading to better coordinated care.”

26. HIPAA

A federal law that protects the privacy and security of an individual’s health information. It sets standards for the storage, use, and disclosure of medical records and other personal health information.

  • For example, “Make sure you sign the HIPAA form before your doctor can access your medical records.”
  • A healthcare provider might say, “We must follow HIPAA guidelines to ensure patient confidentiality.”
  • A patient might ask, “Does HIPAA allow me to access my own medical records?”

27. DNR

A medical order that instructs healthcare providers not to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if a person’s heart stops or they stop breathing. It is typically used for patients who have a terminal illness or who do not wish to be resuscitated.

  • For instance, “The patient’s DNR status was clearly communicated to the medical team.”
  • A family member might discuss with a doctor, “We have decided to put a DNR order in place for our loved one.”
  • A healthcare professional might explain, “A DNR order ensures that a patient’s end-of-life wishes are respected.”

28. NPO

A Latin term that means “nothing by mouth.” It is a medical instruction to withhold oral food and fluids from a patient for a specific period of time, usually before a medical procedure or surgery.

  • For example, “The patient was instructed to be NPO after midnight before the surgery.”
  • A nurse might note, “The patient is currently NPO in preparation for an upcoming procedure.”
  • A doctor might order, “Please keep the patient NPO until further notice.”

29. BID

An abbreviation for the Latin phrase “bis in die,” which means “twice a day.” It is commonly used in medical prescriptions to indicate the frequency at which a medication should be taken.

  • For instance, “Take one tablet BID, with breakfast and dinner.”
  • A pharmacist might label a medication bottle, “Take 2 capsules BID for 10 days.”
  • A doctor might say, “Please remember to take your medication BID for optimal results.”

30. TID

An abbreviation for the Latin phrase “ter in die,” which means “three times a day.” It is commonly used in medical prescriptions to indicate the frequency at which a medication should be taken.

  • For example, “Take one tablet TID, after each meal.”
  • A pharmacist might provide instructions, “Take 2 capsules TID for one week.”
  • A doctor might advise, “Please follow the TID dosing schedule for this medication.”

31. QID

QID is an abbreviation for the Latin term “quater in die,” which means “four times a day.” It is used to indicate the frequency at which a medication should be taken.

  • For example, a doctor might write a prescription that says, “Take this medication QID with meals.”
  • A nurse might ask a patient, “Are you remembering to take your medication QID?”
  • A pharmacist might label a medication bottle with the instructions, “Take 1 tablet QID.”

32. PRN

PRN is an abbreviation for the Latin term “pro re nata,” which means “as the thing is needed.” It is used to indicate that a medication should be taken only when necessary, rather than on a regular schedule.

  • For instance, a doctor might prescribe a pain medication and instruct the patient to take it PRN for pain relief.
  • A nurse might ask a patient, “Do you need any medication PRN right now?”
  • A pharmacist might include the instructions, “Take 1 tablet PRN for allergies” on a medication label.
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33. STAT

STAT is a medical term derived from the Latin word “statim,” which means “immediately.” It is used to indicate that a medication or treatment should be administered as quickly as possible.

  • For example, in an emergency situation, a nurse might yell, “We need to give this patient medication STAT!”
  • A doctor might write an order that says, “Start IV fluids STAT.”
  • A pharmacist might receive a prescription with the instructions, “Dispense medication STAT.”

34. SOAP

SOAP is an acronym that stands for Subjective, Objective, Assessment, and Plan. It is a method used by healthcare professionals to organize and document patient information in medical records.

  • For instance, during a medical visit, a doctor might ask the patient about their symptoms (Subjective), perform a physical examination (Objective), make a diagnosis (Assessment), and develop a treatment plan (Plan).
  • A nurse might document in a patient’s chart, “SOAP note: Patient reports increased pain (S), vital signs within normal range (O), diagnosis of sprained ankle (A), plan to apply ice and elevate (P).”
  • A medical student might learn the SOAP format as a framework for presenting patient cases during rounds.

35. C&S

C&S is an abbreviation for Culture and Sensitivity. It refers to a laboratory test that is performed to identify the presence of bacteria or other microorganisms in a sample (culture) and determine which antibiotics are effective in treating the infection (sensitivity).

  • For example, a doctor might order a C&S test on a urine sample to determine the appropriate antibiotic for a urinary tract infection.
  • A nurse might collect a wound swab for C&S testing to guide antibiotic treatment.
  • A microbiologist might report the results of a C&S test, indicating the specific bacteria present and the antibiotics to which they are sensitive.

36. CBC

A CBC is a common blood test that provides information about the different types and numbers of cells in the blood. It includes measurements of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.

  • For example, a doctor might order a CBC to check for anemia or infection.
  • A nurse might say, “I’ll need to draw some blood for a CBC.”
  • A patient might ask, “What does my CBC show?”

37. UA

A UA is a test that analyzes the urine for various substances, including glucose, protein, and red and white blood cells. It can provide information about kidney function, urinary tract infections, and other conditions.

  • For instance, a doctor might order a UA to diagnose a urinary tract infection.
  • A nurse might collect a urine sample for a UA.
  • A patient might ask, “What do the results of my UA mean?”

38. ETOH

ETOH is a term used in medical records to refer to alcohol. It is derived from the chemical name for alcohol, which is ethyl alcohol or ethanol.

  • For example, a doctor might note in a patient’s chart, “Patient admitted with ETOH intoxication.”
  • A nurse might ask a patient, “Do you consume ETOH?”
  • A medical student might study the effects of ETOH on the body.

39. BMI

BMI is a calculation that uses a person’s height and weight to determine their body fatness. It is often used as a screening tool to assess whether a person has a healthy weight for their height.

  • For instance, a doctor might calculate a patient’s BMI to determine if they are overweight or underweight.
  • A fitness instructor might discuss the importance of maintaining a healthy BMI.
  • A person might ask, “What is a normal BMI range?”

40. COPD

COPD is a chronic lung disease that causes airflow obstruction and breathing difficulties. It includes conditions such as chronic bronchitis and emphysema.

  • For example, a doctor might diagnose a patient with COPD after conducting lung function tests.
  • A respiratory therapist might provide treatment and education for patients with COPD.
  • A person with COPD might join a support group to connect with others facing similar challenges.

41. UTI

This is an infection that affects any part of the urinary system, including the kidneys, bladder, ureters, and urethra. It is commonly caused by bacteria entering the urinary tract.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I think I have a UTI because I have pain and burning during urination.”
  • A doctor might diagnose a patient with a UTI based on symptoms such as frequent urination and cloudy urine.
  • Someone might ask for advice, saying, “I’ve had a UTI before. What are some home remedies to alleviate the symptoms?”

42. MI

Also known as a heart attack, this occurs when the blood flow to the heart muscle is blocked, causing damage or death to the heart tissue. It is usually caused by a blood clot in one of the coronary arteries.

  • For example, a person might say, “My grandfather had an MI last year and had to undergo surgery.”
  • A doctor might discuss the risk factors for an MI, such as smoking and high cholesterol.
  • A person might ask, “What are the warning signs of an MI? I want to be prepared.”

43. CVA

Also known as a stroke, this occurs when the blood supply to the brain is interrupted or reduced, leading to the death of brain cells. It can be caused by a blood clot or a burst blood vessel.

  • For instance, a person might say, “My uncle had a CVA and now has difficulty speaking.”
  • A doctor might explain the different types of CVAs, such as ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes.
  • Someone might ask, “What are the risk factors for a CVA? I want to prevent it if possible.”

44. TIA

Also known as a mini-stroke, this is a temporary disruption of blood flow to the brain. It is similar to a stroke but does not cause permanent damage. Symptoms may last for a few minutes to a few hours.

  • For example, a person might say, “I had a TIA last week and it was really scary, but thankfully the symptoms went away.”
  • A doctor might explain that a TIA is a warning sign of a possible future stroke.
  • Someone might ask, “What should I do if I experience symptoms of a TIA? Should I go to the emergency room?”

45. DVT

This occurs when a blood clot forms in a deep vein, usually in the leg. It can cause pain, swelling, and redness in the affected area. If the clot breaks loose and travels to the lungs, it can be life-threatening.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I developed a DVT after a long flight and had to be treated with blood thinners.”
  • A doctor might discuss the risk factors for DVT, such as prolonged immobility and certain medical conditions.
  • Someone might ask, “What are the symptoms of DVT? I’m worried I might have it.”

46. PE

This term refers to a medical examination that involves assessing a patient’s overall physical health. It typically includes checking vital signs, performing a visual inspection, and conducting various tests and measurements.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “Let’s start with a PE to get a baseline assessment of your health.”
  • During a physical examination, a nurse might ask the patient, “When was your last PE?”
  • A patient might describe their experience by saying, “The doctor performed a thorough PE and checked all my body systems.”

47. Script

Informally referred to as a “script,” this term is used to describe a written order from a healthcare professional for a specific medication or treatment. A prescription is typically given to a patient by a doctor or other authorized medical practitioner.

  • For instance, a pharmacist might ask a customer, “Do you have a script for this medication?”
  • When discussing medication, a doctor might say, “I’ll write you a script for antibiotics to treat the infection.”
  • A patient might mention, “I need to pick up my script at the pharmacy later today.”

48. Pill pusher

This term is sometimes used colloquially to refer to a pharmacist, the healthcare professional responsible for dispensing medications. The term “pill pusher” can carry a slightly negative connotation, implying that the pharmacist simply hands out pills without much thought or consideration.

  • For example, a patient might say, “I need to talk to the pill pusher about my medication side effects.”
  • When discussing a pharmacy, someone might comment, “The pill pusher there is always helpful and knowledgeable.”
  • A doctor might mention, “I’ll call the pill pusher to clarify the prescription instructions.”

49. Gas passer

This term is slang for an anesthesiologist, a medical doctor who specializes in administering anesthesia to patients during surgical procedures. The term “gas passer” refers to the common use of inhaled anesthetics during surgery.

  • For instance, a nurse might say, “The gas passer will be in shortly to discuss the anesthesia options.”
  • When discussing surgery, a patient might ask, “Will the gas passer be present during the procedure?”
  • A doctor might introduce themselves as, “Hi, I’m Dr. Smith, the gas passer for your surgery.”

50. Candy man

This term is sometimes used jokingly or affectionately to refer to a pediatrician, a medical doctor who specializes in the care of children. The term “candy man” is derived from the idea that pediatricians often give out lollipops or other treats to children after appointments.

  • For example, a parent might say, “We’re going to see the candy man for my child’s check-up.”
  • When recommending a doctor, someone might say, “I highly recommend the candy man for your kids.”
  • A pediatrician might introduce themselves as, “Hi, I’m Dr. Johnson, also known as the candy man around here.”

51. White coat

This term refers to a doctor or medical professional, often used to describe their attire. The white coat is a symbol of authority and expertise in the medical field.

  • For example, a patient might say, “I’m waiting to see the white coat for my check-up.”
  • In a hospital setting, a nurse might ask, “Have you seen the white coat on rounds?”
  • A medical student might say, “I can’t wait to wear the white coat and start practicing medicine.”

52. Scrubs

Scrubs are the standard uniform worn by medical professionals such as doctors, nurses, and technicians. They are loose-fitting, comfortable clothing that allows for easy movement and cleanliness.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “I need to change into my scrubs before surgery.”
  • A nurse might ask, “Can you grab my stethoscope from my scrubs pocket?”
  • In a TV show about a hospital, a character might say, “I spilled coffee on my scrubs again!”

53. Bloodsucker

This term is slang for a phlebotomist, a medical professional who specializes in drawing blood from patients for various tests and procedures. The term “bloodsucker” is often used in a playful or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, a patient might say, “The bloodsucker is here to take my blood again.”
  • A phlebotomist might introduce themselves by saying, “I’m the bloodsucker, here to make your day.”
  • In a conversation about medical procedures, someone might say, “I’m not a fan of the bloodsucker, but I know it’s necessary.”

54. Sawbones

This term is slang for a surgeon, often used in a humorous or informal context. It refers to the use of surgical instruments, which can resemble bonesaws, during surgical procedures.

  • For instance, a patient might say, “I’m nervous about the sawbones operating on me.”
  • In a discussion about medical specialties, someone might ask, “Who’s the best sawbones in town?”
  • A surgeon might introduce themselves by saying, “I’m the sawbones you’ve been waiting for.”

55. Quack

This term is slang for a fake or unqualified doctor who claims to have medical knowledge or skills. It is often used to describe someone who practices medicine without proper training or credentials.

  • For example, a patient might say, “I went to see a quack and they misdiagnosed me.”
  • In a conversation about medical scams, someone might say, “Be careful not to fall for a quack’s promises.”
  • A doctor might warn their patients by saying, “Don’t trust a quack. Always verify their credentials.”

56. Zapper

A defibrillator is a medical device used to restore a normal heartbeat by delivering an electric shock to the heart. “Zapper” is a slang term used to refer to a defibrillator, often used in informal or humorous contexts.

  • For example, in a TV show about a hospital, a character might say, “Get the zapper, we’re losing him!”
  • In a conversation about emergency medical procedures, someone might ask, “Do you know how to use a zapper to restart a heart?”
  • A medical professional might say, “The zapper is an essential tool in resuscitation efforts.”

57. Crash cart

An emergency cart is a mobile unit stocked with medical supplies and equipment needed for emergency situations. “Crash cart” is a slang term used to refer to an emergency cart, often used in hospital settings.

  • For instance, in a medical drama, a doctor might yell, “Bring the crash cart, we have a code blue!”
  • During a training session, a nurse might explain, “The crash cart is always stocked with medications and equipment for immediate use.”
  • A hospital employee might say, “I need to restock the crash cart with supplies before the next shift.”

58. Blue juice

Methylthioninium chloride is a medication used to treat methemoglobinemia, a condition in which the blood is unable to carry oxygen effectively. “Blue juice” is a slang term used to refer to methylthioninium chloride, often used in medical settings.

  • For example, a nurse might say, “Administer the blue juice to the patient with methemoglobinemia.”
  • A doctor discussing treatment options might mention, “We can use blue juice to counteract the effects of methemoglobinemia.”
  • A medical student studying pharmacology might learn, “Blue juice is an effective antidote for certain blood disorders.”

59. Pink lady

An antacid is a medication used to relieve heartburn, indigestion, and other symptoms caused by excess stomach acid. “Pink lady” is a slang term used to refer to antacids, often used in informal or colloquial contexts.

  • For instance, someone experiencing heartburn might say, “I need to take a pink lady to soothe my stomach.”
  • In a conversation about digestive health, a pharmacist might recommend, “Try taking a pink lady after meals to reduce acid reflux.”
  • A person sharing their home remedy might suggest, “Mix baking soda and water to create a homemade pink lady for quick relief.”

60. Horse pills

Large-sized pills are medications that come in a significantly larger size compared to standard tablets or capsules. “Horse pills” is a slang term used to refer to large-sized pills, often used humorously or to emphasize the pill’s size.

  • For example, someone struggling to swallow a large pill might say, “I can’t believe they expect me to swallow this horse pill!”
  • A doctor discussing medication options might mention, “We have an alternative to the horse pills if you have difficulty swallowing.”
  • A person sharing their experience with medication might say, “I had to take these horse pills, but they made a noticeable difference in my symptoms.”

61. Happy pills

This term is often used to refer to antidepressant medications, which are prescribed to treat depression and other mood disorders. The term “happy pills” is somewhat colloquial and can be seen as both a lighthearted and derogatory way to describe these medications.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m feeling down today, I think I need my happy pills.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, a person might ask, “Have you tried therapy or are you relying solely on happy pills?”
  • Another person might comment, “I’m grateful for my happy pills, they’ve really improved my quality of life.”

62. Vitamin I

This term is used to refer to the over-the-counter pain reliever ibuprofen. The letter “I” in “Vitamin I” stands for ibuprofen, and the term is often used jokingly or informally.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have a headache, time for some Vitamin I.”
  • In a conversation about dealing with minor aches and pains, a person might mention, “I always keep a bottle of Vitamin I in my purse.”
  • Another person might comment, “Vitamin I is my go-to for cramps, it works like a charm.”

63. Code blue

In medical settings, “code blue” is a term used to indicate a patient in cardiac arrest or experiencing a life-threatening medical emergency. The term is derived from the color code used to designate such emergencies.

  • For example, a nurse might call out, “Code blue, room 302!”
  • In a discussion about emergency medical procedures, a person might ask, “What’s the protocol for a code blue situation?”
  • Another person might comment, “I was in the hospital when a code blue was called, it was really intense.”

64. Candy striper

This term refers to a person, typically a young volunteer, who assists in a hospital setting. The term “candy striper” originated from the red-and-white striped pinafores that volunteers used to wear, resembling candy canes.

  • For instance, a person might say, “My daughter is a candy striper at the local hospital.”
  • In a conversation about volunteering, someone might ask, “Do candy stripers have any specific duties or responsibilities?”
  • Another person might comment, “I remember being a candy striper when I was younger, it was a great experience.”

65. Suture fairy

This term is used humorously to refer to a surgeon, especially one who performs surgeries involving sutures (stitches). The term “suture fairy” suggests that the surgeon has a skillful and almost magical ability to close incisions and wounds.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m scheduled to meet with the suture fairy tomorrow for my appendectomy.”
  • In a discussion about surgical procedures, a person might ask, “Does the suture fairy use dissolvable sutures or do they need to be removed?”
  • Another person might comment, “I’m grateful for the suture fairy’s expertise, they did an incredible job on my scar.”

66. Brain doc

This term refers to a neurologist, a medical doctor who specializes in diagnosing and treating diseases and disorders of the brain and nervous system.

  • For example, “I have an appointment with my brain doc next week to discuss my migraines.”
  • A person might say, “My brain doc recommended some exercises to improve my memory.”
  • In a conversation about neurological conditions, someone might ask, “Has anyone here seen a brain doc for their epilepsy?”

67. Shrink

This is a colloquial term for a psychiatrist, a medical doctor who specializes in diagnosing and treating mental illnesses and disorders.

  • For instance, “I’ve been seeing my shrink for therapy sessions to help manage my anxiety.”
  • A person might say, “My shrink prescribed me some medication to help with my depression.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might ask, “Has anyone else had a positive experience with their shrink?”

68. Pill popper

This term is often used to refer to someone who takes a lot of medication, either prescribed or over-the-counter.

  • For example, “I’m not a pill popper, but I do take medication for my chronic pain.”
  • A person might say, “My grandma is a pill popper. She takes a handful of pills every morning.”
  • In a conversation about medication side effects, someone might ask, “Does anyone else here struggle with feeling like a pill popper due to their medication regimen?”

69. Meds

This is a shortened form of the word “medications” and is commonly used to refer to prescribed or over-the-counter drugs.

  • For instance, “I need to remember to take my meds before bed.”
  • A person might say, “I ran out of my meds and need to refill my prescription.”
  • In a discussion about managing chronic conditions, someone might ask, “How do you remember to take your meds every day?”

70. Steth

This is a slang term for a stethoscope, a medical instrument used by doctors and other healthcare professionals to listen to a patient’s heartbeat and lung sounds.

  • For example, “The doctor placed the steth on my chest to listen to my heart.”
  • A person might say, “I’m thinking of becoming a doctor. I can’t wait to wear a white coat and carry a steth.”
  • In a conversation about medical equipment, someone might ask, “Does anyone know where I can buy a good-quality steth?”

71. O2

O2 is the chemical symbol for oxygen, an essential element for life. In a medical context, O2 refers to the administration of supplemental oxygen to a patient.

  • For instance, a doctor might order, “Administer 2 liters of O2 via nasal cannula.”
  • In an emergency situation, a paramedic might say, “The patient is in respiratory distress, we need to start O2 immediately.”
  • A nurse might document, “Patient’s O2 saturation level is 95% on room air.”

72. EEG

EEG is a diagnostic test that measures electrical activity in the brain. It involves placing electrodes on the scalp to detect and record brain wave patterns.

  • For example, a neurologist might order, “Schedule an EEG to evaluate the patient’s seizure activity.”
  • A technician performing the test might explain, “We’ll be attaching electrodes to your scalp to monitor your brain waves during the EEG.”
  • A doctor interpreting the results might note, “The EEG shows abnormal spikes in brain activity, indicating possible epilepsy.”

73. LP

LP is a medical procedure also known as a spinal tap. It involves inserting a needle into the lower back to collect cerebrospinal fluid for diagnostic purposes.

  • For instance, a neurologist might order, “Perform an LP to rule out meningitis.”
  • A nurse preparing a patient might say, “You’ll need to lie on your side and curl up for the LP.”
  • A doctor discussing the results might explain, “The LP showed elevated levels of white blood cells, indicating an infection.”

74. Peds

Peds is a shorthand term for the medical specialty of pediatrics, which focuses on the health and medical care of infants, children, and adolescents.

  • For example, a parent might say, “We have an appointment with the peds clinic for my child’s check-up.”
  • A pediatrician discussing their practice might say, “I specialize in peds and have been treating children for over 20 years.”
  • A nurse working in a pediatric unit might explain, “We provide specialized care for peds patients, including play therapy and age-appropriate activities.”

75. Ortho

Ortho is a shortened version of the medical specialty of orthopedics, which focuses on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disorders and injuries of the musculoskeletal system.

  • For instance, a patient might say, “I’m seeing the ortho doctor for my knee pain.”
  • An orthopedic surgeon discussing their practice might say, “I specialize in ortho and perform joint replacement surgeries.”
  • A physical therapist working with ortho patients might explain, “We focus on rehabilitating ortho patients to regain strength and mobility.”

76. Psych

Short for psychiatry, which is the branch of medicine that deals with the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of mental disorders. “Psych” is commonly used as a shorthand term for psychiatric or psychological.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “I specialize in psych, specifically in treating anxiety disorders.”
  • A patient might ask, “Can you recommend any good psych books for understanding depression?”
  • In a hospital setting, a nurse might report, “We have a patient in the psych ward who needs to be monitored closely.”

77. Cardiac

Referring to the field of cardiology, which focuses on the study and treatment of heart-related conditions. “Cardiac” is often used as a slang term to describe anything related to the heart or cardiovascular system.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “We need to run some cardiac tests to determine the cause of your chest pain.”
  • A patient might mention, “I have a cardiac condition that requires me to take medication daily.”
  • In a medical conference, a speaker might discuss, “The latest advancements in cardiac surgery techniques.”

78. Derm

Short for dermatology, which is the branch of medicine that deals with the diagnosis and treatment of skin disorders. “Derm” is commonly used as a shorthand term for dermatological or dermatology-related.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “I’m going into derm because I love studying skin conditions.”
  • A patient might ask, “Can you recommend any derm-approved skincare products for acne?”
  • In a clinic, a nurse might report, “We have a derm patient coming in for a follow-up appointment.”

79. Rad Onc

Referring to the field of radiation oncology, which focuses on the use of radiation therapy to treat cancer. “Rad Onc” is often used as a shortened term to describe anything related to radiation oncology.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “I specialize in rad onc and work with cancer patients undergoing radiation treatment.”
  • A patient might mention, “I’m scheduled for my rad onc session tomorrow.”
  • In a research study, a scientist might discuss, “The latest advancements in rad onc techniques for targeting tumors.”

80. Path

Short for pathology, which is the branch of medicine that deals with the study of diseases and their effects on the body. “Path” is commonly used as a shorthand term for pathological or pathology-related.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “I work in path and analyze tissue samples to identify diseases.”
  • A medical student might ask, “Can you recommend any good path textbooks for studying for the exam?”
  • In a hospital, a lab technician might report, “We have a path specimen that needs to be processed and analyzed.”

81. Pharm

This term is short for “pharmacy” and is commonly used to refer to a place where medications are dispensed or sold. It can also be used to describe the field of pharmacy or the study of pharmaceuticals.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to pick up my prescription at the pharm.”
  • A student studying pharmacy might say, “I’m majoring in pharm and hope to become a pharmacist.”
  • A person discussing the healthcare system might mention, “The cost of medications at the pharm is a major concern for many people.”

82. RT

This abbreviation stands for “respiratory therapist,” which is a healthcare professional who specializes in the treatment and care of patients with respiratory conditions. They often work in hospitals, clinics, or other healthcare settings.

  • For instance, someone might say, “My sister is an RT and helps patients with breathing difficulties.”
  • A patient with asthma might say, “I see my RT regularly to manage my condition.”
  • A healthcare professional might mention, “RTs play a crucial role in the care of patients with COVID-19.”

83. HR

In the medical field, “HR” is commonly used as an abbreviation for “heart rate.” It refers to the number of times the heart beats per minute and is an important indicator of a person’s cardiovascular health.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “The patient’s HR is within the normal range.”
  • A fitness enthusiast might say, “I wear a smartwatch to track my HR during workouts.”
  • A nurse might document a patient’s vital signs by noting, “HR: 80 bpm.”

84. ED

The term “ED” is often used as an abbreviation for “emergency department,” which is a specialized department in a hospital that provides immediate medical care for patients with acute illnesses or injuries.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I had to go to the ED after a car accident.”
  • A healthcare professional might mention, “The ED is always busy, especially on weekends.”
  • A patient might ask, “How long is the average wait time in the ED?”

85. STD

This acronym stands for “sexually transmitted disease,” which refers to infections that are primarily transmitted through sexual contact. STDs can be caused by bacteria, viruses, or parasites and can have serious health consequences if left untreated.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “It’s important to practice safe sex to prevent STDs.”
  • A person discussing sexual health might mention, “Getting tested regularly is crucial for detecting and treating STDs.”
  • A public health campaign might use the slogan, “Know your status, get tested for STDs.”