Top 75 Slang For Mention – Meaning & Usage

Whether you’re a social media enthusiast or just trying to keep up with the latest trends, staying in the loop with the ever-evolving world of slang is essential. So, buckle up and get ready to dive into our list of the top slang words and phrases for mention. From the hippest urban lingo to the hottest internet jargon, we’ve got you covered. Trust us, you won’t want to miss out on this linguistic adventure!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Allude to

When someone alludes to something, they are hinting at or indirectly referencing it without explicitly stating it.

  • For example, in a conversation about a secret, someone might say, “I can’t say much, but let’s just say she alluded to the truth.”
  • In a book review, a critic might write, “The author skillfully alludes to classic literature throughout the novel.”
  • A teacher might say, “The author’s use of symbolism alludes to deeper themes in the story.”

2. Bring up

To bring up something means to mention or introduce a topic into a conversation or discussion.

  • For instance, during a meeting, someone might say, “I wanted to bring up the issue of budget cuts.”
  • In a group discussion about favorite movies, someone might bring up a classic film and say, “Has anyone seen ‘Casablanca’?”
  • A friend might bring up an embarrassing moment from the past and say, “Remember that time you tripped in front of everyone? Let’s not bring that up again.”

3. Cite

To cite something means to refer to a source or quote it as evidence or support for an argument or statement.

  • For example, in an academic paper, a student might write, “According to Smith (2019), the study found that…” and then cite the specific information.
  • In a news article, a journalist might write, “The report cites several experts who suggest that…” and then include the experts’ opinions.
  • During a debate, someone might say, “I would like to cite a study that proves my point.”

4. Declare

To declare means to formally announce or state something, often with authority or certainty.

  • For instance, a politician might declare their candidacy for an upcoming election by saying, “I am officially declaring my candidacy for mayor.”
  • In a courtroom, a lawyer might declare, “I object!” to challenge the admissibility of evidence.
  • A parent might declare to their child, “You are grounded for the rest of the week.”

5. Designate

To designate means to assign a specific meaning or role to something or someone.

  • For example, in a meeting, a manager might designate one person as the team leader by saying, “John, I’m designating you as the team leader for this project.”
  • In a classroom, a teacher might designate specific seats for each student.
  • A company might designate a certain area of their office as a break room.

6. Hint at

To indirectly suggest or imply something without explicitly stating it. This phrase is often used when trying to give someone a clue or make them aware of something without directly saying it.

  • For example, “She didn’t say it directly, but she hinted at wanting to go on a date.”
  • In a conversation about a surprise party, someone might say, “I don’t want to spoil the surprise, but I can hint at what the theme will be.”
  • A friend might say, “I can’t tell you directly, but I can hint at who has a crush on you.”

7. Imply

To suggest or convey something without explicitly stating it. This word is often used when someone is trying to communicate a message or meaning without directly saying it.

  • For instance, “She didn’t say it outright, but her words implied that she was disappointed.”
  • In a discussion about a book, someone might say, “The author’s use of symbolism implies a deeper meaning.”
  • A person might comment, “His tone of voice implied that he was joking.”

8. Intimate

To suggest or convey something indirectly. This word is often used when trying to give someone a subtle clue or suggestion without directly stating it.

  • For example, “He intimated that he wanted to leave by checking his watch.”
  • In a conversation about a surprise party, someone might intimate the date and time without revealing all the details.
  • A person might say, “I can’t say it outright, but I can intimate what the answer might be.”

9. Mention

To bring up or refer to someone or something in conversation or writing. This word is often used when acknowledging or talking about someone or something without going into great detail.

  • For instance, “She mentioned her upcoming vacation during our conversation.”
  • In a discussion about favorite books, someone might mention a classic novel they enjoyed reading.
  • A person might say, “I didn’t catch his name, but he mentioned that he works in finance.”

10. Name

To specifically refer to someone or something by their given name. This word is often used when directly identifying or addressing someone or something.

  • For example, “She named her dog Max.”
  • In a conversation about historical figures, someone might name a famous leader from the past.
  • A person might say, “I can’t remember the exact title, but I can name a few of the actors in the movie.”

11. Point out

To draw attention to something or someone, often in a critical or negative way.

  • For example, “She pointed out all the flaws in his argument.”
  • In a meeting, a colleague might say, “I just want to point out that we’ve missed an important deadline.”
  • A teacher might point out a student’s mistake by saying, “You need to double-check your work and fix this error.”

12. Present

To bring up or refer to something or someone in conversation or a discussion.

  • For instance, “He presented several options for the project.”
  • In a presentation, a speaker might say, “I would like to present a new approach to problem-solving.”
  • A news anchor might present the latest updates by saying, “Now, let’s present the top stories of the day.”

13. Quote

To repeat or mention someone’s exact words, often to support or illustrate a point.

  • For example, “She quoted the author’s words to emphasize her argument.”
  • In a news article, a journalist might quote a witness by saying, “The witness stated, ‘I saw the suspect running away from the scene.'”
  • A student might quote a passage from a book in their essay to support their analysis.

14. @

To include someone’s username in a social media post or comment to directly notify or involve them in the conversation.

  • For instance, “I @mentioned my friend in the photo caption.”
  • In a Twitter conversation, a user might say, “@username I totally agree with your point.”
  • A content creator might ask their followers, “Who should I @mention in my next video?”

15. #

To use a hashtag symbol (#) followed by a word or phrase to categorize or identify a post on social media.

  • For example, “I #love this new song!”
  • In an Instagram post, a user might say, “Just enjoying a #beautiful sunset.”
  • A company might encourage their followers to use a specific hashtag by saying, “Don’t forget to tag your photos with #CompanyX for a chance to be featured!”

16. RT

This is a term used on Twitter to indicate that someone is reposting or sharing another user’s tweet. When you “retweet” a tweet, it appears on your own timeline for your followers to see.

  • For example, “RT @username: Check out this funny meme!”
  • A user might retweet a news article and add, “This is an important read.”
  • Another might retweet a tweet and comment, “I agree with this sentiment.”

17. DM

A private message sent between two Twitter users. Unlike regular tweets, direct messages can only be seen by the sender and recipient.

  • For instance, “Can you DM me your email address?”
  • A user might receive a direct message asking, “How did you create that amazing graphic?”
  • Another might send a direct message to apologize and say, “I didn’t mean to offend you with my previous tweet.”

18. CC

This term comes from the practice of using carbon paper to make copies of a document. In digital communication, “CC” is used to indicate that someone is being included in an email or message as an additional recipient.

  • For example, “I’m sending this email to John, CCing Sarah.”
  • A user might send an email and add, “Please CC the team on this message.”
  • Another might receive an email and ask, “Can you CC me on any future updates?”

19. FYI

This is a common abbreviation used to indicate that the information being shared is meant for the recipient’s knowledge or awareness.

  • For instance, “FYI, the meeting has been rescheduled to tomorrow.”
  • A user might send an email and include, “FYI, there’s a new policy in effect starting next week.”
  • Another might receive a message and reply, “Thanks for the FYI. I’ll keep that in mind.”

20. TBH

This term is often used to preface a statement or opinion that the speaker feels is honest or candid.

  • For example, “TBH, I didn’t really enjoy that movie.”
  • A user might comment on a post and say, “TBH, I think your idea needs more work.”
  • Another might reply to a question and start with, “TBH, I’m not sure of the answer.”

21. IMO

This is used to preface a statement or opinion to indicate that it is subjective and may not be universally true. It is often used in online discussions or forums to express personal viewpoints.

  • For example, “IMO, the new album is better than their previous work.”
  • A user might comment, “IMO, pineapple does belong on pizza.”
  • In a debate about a controversial topic, someone might say, “IMO, the government should prioritize healthcare reform.”

22. SMH

This is used to express disappointment, disapproval, or disbelief. It is typically used in response to something foolish, absurd, or frustrating.

  • For instance, “SMH, I can’t believe they canceled the event at the last minute.”
  • A user might comment, “SMH, people really need to learn how to park.”
  • In a discussion about a ridiculous statement, someone might say, “SMH, some people just have no common sense.”

23. LOL

This is used to indicate amusement or laughter in online conversations. It is often used to express humor or to lighten the tone of a message.

  • For example, “LOL, that joke cracked me up.”
  • A user might comment, “LOL, that cat video is hilarious.”
  • In response to a funny meme, someone might say, “LOL, this made my day.”

24. OMG

This is used to express surprise, shock, or astonishment. It is often used to emphasize strong emotions or reactions.

  • For instance, “OMG, I can’t believe they won the championship.”
  • A user might comment, “OMG, that movie ending was so unexpected.”
  • In a discussion about a major news event, someone might say, “OMG, this is such a game-changer.”

25. BTW

This is used to introduce additional or related information in a conversation. It is often used to add a side note or to provide context.

  • For example, “BTW, I forgot to mention that the event starts at 7 PM.”
  • A user might comment, “BTW, there’s a sale going on this weekend.”
  • In a discussion about travel plans, someone might say, “BTW, the hotel offers free breakfast.”

26. IDK

Used to indicate that the speaker does not have the answer or is unsure about something. “IDK” is a popular abbreviation used in text messages and online conversations.

  • For example, if someone asks, “What time does the movie start?” and you don’t know, you might respond with “IDK.”
  • When asked about a complicated math problem, a student might say, “IDK, I’ll have to look it up.”
  • If someone asks for your opinion on a controversial topic and you’re unsure, you could reply with “IDK, I need more information.”

27. ASAP

An abbreviation used to convey urgency or the need for immediate action. “ASAP” is often used in work or professional settings to indicate that a task should be completed quickly.

  • For instance, if your boss asks you to finish a report, they might say, “I need that report ASAP.”
  • If you’re trying to schedule a meeting with a busy colleague, you could ask, “When are you available? I need to meet ASAP.”
  • When making travel arrangements, you might tell a friend, “Book your flight ASAP to get the best deals.”

28. BRB

A phrase used to indicate that the speaker will be temporarily unavailable or away from the conversation. “BRB” is commonly used in online chats or text messages.

  • For example, if you’re in the middle of a text conversation and need to step away for a moment, you might say, “BRB.”
  • During an online gaming session, a player might announce, “BRB, I need to grab a snack.”
  • If someone asks for your help while you’re on a phone call, you could say, “BRB, just need to finish this call.”

29. TTYL

A phrase used to indicate that the speaker will end the conversation but plans to talk again in the future. “TTYL” is commonly used in text messages or online chats.

  • For instance, if you’re chatting with a friend and need to go, you might say, “I need to go now, TTYL!”
  • When saying goodbye to a colleague at the end of the workday, you could say, “See you tomorrow, TTYL.”
  • If you’re in the middle of an online game with friends and need to log off, you might type, “Sorry, gotta go, TTYL!”

30. NVM

Used to indicate that the speaker is retracting or dismissing a previous statement or question. “NVM” is often used in text messages or online conversations.

  • For example, if you ask a friend for a favor but then realize you can do it yourself, you might say, “NVM, I got it.”
  • If you’re discussing weekend plans with a group and realize you can’t make it, you could say, “NVM, something came up.”
  • When someone mishears your question and provides an irrelevant answer, you might say, “NVM, I’ll ask someone else.”

31. LMK

This acronym is used to ask someone to inform or update you on a specific matter. It is often used when making plans or asking for information.

  • For instance, you might text a friend, “Are we still meeting for dinner tonight? LMK!”
  • If someone asks for your availability, you can reply, “I’m free tomorrow. LMK what time works for you.”
  • A colleague might email you, “LMK if you have any questions about the project.”

32. IRL

This abbreviation is used to distinguish between online or virtual interactions and interactions that occur in person. It is often used when discussing experiences, relationships, or activities that happen offline.

  • For example, someone might say, “I met my online friend IRL for the first time yesterday!”
  • When discussing a concert, you might say, “The band sounds even better IRL.”
  • If someone compliments your appearance in a photo, you can respond, “Thanks! But I look even better IRL.”

33. TBT

This phrase is used when sharing old photos or memories on social media, typically on a Thursday. It’s a way to reminisce about the past and share nostalgic moments.

  • For instance, you might post a photo from your childhood with the caption, “TBT to the good old days.”
  • When sharing a picture of a previous vacation, you can write, “TBT to that amazing beach trip.”
  • A friend might comment on your TBT post, saying, “I remember that day like it was yesterday!”

34. FOMO

This acronym is used to describe the feeling of anxiety or unease that arises when you believe others are having enjoyable experiences without you. It often refers to the fear of not being included or part of something exciting.

  • For example, if you see your friends at a party and you weren’t invited, you might experience FOMO.
  • When discussing a popular event, someone might say, “I couldn’t go, but I definitely had FOMO.”
  • If you decline an invitation and later regret it, you can say, “I’m experiencing major FOMO right now.”

35. YOLO

This phrase is used to express the idea that life is short and should be lived to the fullest. It often encourages taking risks or seizing opportunities without worrying about the consequences.

  • For instance, before going skydiving, someone might say, “YOLO!”
  • When deciding to try a new adventurous activity, you can say, “Why not? YOLO!”
  • If someone questions your spontaneous decision, you can respond, “Life’s too short to play it safe. YOLO!”

36. BFF

This acronym is used to refer to a close friendship that is expected to last a lifetime. It is commonly used in texts and social media to express a strong bond between friends.

  • For example, someone might post a picture with their best friend and caption it, “Spending the day with my BFF!”
  • In a conversation about friendships, someone might say, “I’ve known her since kindergarten. She’s my BFF.”
  • A person might use this term to describe their relationship with a longtime friend, saying, “We’ve been through everything together. She’s my BFF.”

37. FWIW

This phrase is used to introduce a piece of information or opinion that may or may not be valuable or relevant to the conversation. It is often used to preface a statement that the speaker believes might be helpful or interesting.

  • For instance, someone might comment on a discussion thread, “FWIW, I’ve tried that product before and it didn’t work for me.”
  • In a debate, a person might say, “FWIW, I think we should consider the potential consequences before making a decision.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to share their personal experience, saying, “FWIW, I’ve been to that restaurant and the food was amazing.”

38. AFAIK

This acronym is used to indicate that the information being shared is based on the speaker’s current knowledge and may not be definitive or complete. It is often used to clarify that the speaker’s statement is not an absolute fact.

  • For example, someone might comment on a news article, “AFAIK, the company has not released an official statement yet.”
  • In a conversation about a mutual acquaintance, a person might say, “AFAIK, she’s still studying abroad.”
  • Someone might use this acronym to express uncertainty, saying, “AFAIK, there are no plans for a sequel to that movie.”

39. NSFW

This acronym is used to indicate that the content being shared is inappropriate or explicit and should not be viewed in a professional or public setting. It is often used as a warning to prevent others from accidentally opening or viewing explicit material.

  • For instance, someone might post a link on a social media platform with the caption, “NSFW: Graphic content. Proceed with caution.”
  • In a discussion about office etiquette, a person might say, “Remember to mark any NSFW content as such to avoid any potential issues.”
  • Someone might use this acronym to warn others about explicit language or images, saying, “The video contains NSFW language, so make sure to use headphones.”

40. POV

This acronym is used to refer to someone’s perspective or opinion on a particular topic. It is often used to preface a statement that represents the speaker’s personal viewpoint.

  • For example, someone might comment on a controversial post, “Just my POV, but I think everyone should have the right to marry who they love.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, a person might say, “From my POV, the ending was a bit confusing.”
  • Someone might use this acronym to acknowledge that their statement is subjective, saying, “Just sharing my POV here, but I really enjoyed the book despite the mixed reviews.”

41. ETA

This acronym is commonly used to ask or provide an estimate of when someone or something will arrive at a specific location.

  • For example, “What’s your ETA? We’re waiting for you.”
  • A person might respond, “I’m stuck in traffic. ETA is about 15 minutes.”
  • In a group chat discussing plans, someone might ask, “ETA for dinner? I’m getting hungry.”

42. TMI

Used to indicate that someone has shared more personal or intimate details than necessary or appropriate in a conversation.

  • For instance, if someone starts talking about their bodily functions in a casual conversation, someone might respond with, “TMI, dude.”
  • A person might share, “Just had a really awkward conversation with my boss… TMI, but he told me about his recent breakup.”
  • In a discussion about personal hygiene, someone might say, “I don’t need TMI, but please wash your hands after using the restroom.”

43. HBD

A common abbreviation used to wish someone a happy birthday. It is often used in text messages, social media posts, or online greetings.

  • For example, “HBD! Hope you have an amazing day!”
  • A person might post, “HBD to my best friend. Can’t wait to celebrate with you!”
  • In a comment on someone’s birthday picture, someone might write, “HBD! You look amazing!”

44. TGIF

An expression used to celebrate the end of the workweek and the arrival of the weekend. It is often used in social media posts, text messages, or casual conversations.

  • For instance, “TGIF! Time to relax and unwind.”
  • A person might post, “Long week at work, but TGIF!”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, someone might say, “TGIF! Let’s go out and have some fun.”

45. IIRC

Used to indicate that the following statement is based on the speaker’s memory and may not be entirely accurate. It is often used in online discussions or when recalling past events.

  • For example, “IIRC, they released that album in 2010.”
  • A person might comment, “IIRC, the restaurant had really good reviews.”
  • In a debate about historical facts, someone might say, “IIRC, the treaty was signed in 1945.”

46. IMHO

This is a phrase used to preface a personal opinion or viewpoint. It is often used to express humility or to soften the impact of a potentially controversial statement.

  • For example, “IMHO, pineapple does not belong on pizza.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “IMHO, it’s important to vote for candidates who prioritize healthcare.”
  • Another person might share, “IMHO, the best way to learn a new language is through immersion.”

47. LMAO

This acronym is used to indicate that something is extremely funny. It is a more intense version of “LOL” (laugh out loud) and is often used in online conversations or social media.

  • For instance, “That joke was hilarious! LMAO!”
  • In a funny video, someone might comment, “I can’t stop laughing! LMAO!”
  • Another person might say, “LMAO, that meme is so relatable!”

48. WIP

This term is used to describe something that is not yet complete or finished. It is often used to acknowledge that a project or task is still being worked on.

  • For example, “Here’s a sneak peek of my latest painting. It’s still a WIP.”
  • In a discussion about a book, someone might say, “I’m halfway through the novel, so my opinion is still WIP.”
  • Another person might share, “I’m learning how to play the guitar, and my skills are a WIP.”

49. OOTD

This acronym is used to share or showcase one’s daily outfit. It is commonly used in fashion-related discussions, social media posts, or blogs.

  • For instance, “Here’s my OOTD. I love how these colors go together!”
  • In a fashion community, someone might comment, “Your OOTD is on point!”
  • Another person might say, “I’m looking for inspiration for tomorrow’s OOTD.”

50. YMMV

This phrase is used to acknowledge that individual experiences or results may differ. It is often used to indicate that while something may work for one person, it may not work for everyone.

  • For example, “This skincare product worked wonders for me, but YMMV.”
  • In a discussion about a restaurant, someone might say, “The food was delicious, but YMMV depending on your taste.”
  • Another person might share, “I found this workout routine effective, but YMMV depending on your fitness level.”

51. TFW

This acronym is used to express a relatable emotion or reaction to a situation. It is often accompanied by a meme or image that captures the feeling.

  • For instance, “TFW you finally finish a difficult task.”
  • Someone might say, “TFW you see your favorite band perform live for the first time.”
  • A user might comment, “TFW you wake up and realize it’s the weekend.”

52. NBD

This abbreviation is used to downplay or dismiss the significance of something. It is often used to indicate that something is not a cause for concern or to emphasize that a situation is not as important as it may seem.

  • For example, “I just won a million dollars, but NBD.”
  • A person might say, “I aced my final exam, NBD.”
  • Someone might comment, “Just climbed Mount Everest, NBD.”

53. ICYMI

This acronym is used to draw attention to something that may have been overlooked or not seen by others. It is often used when sharing a link or summarizing important information.

  • For instance, “ICYMI, here’s a recap of last night’s episode.”
  • A user might comment, “ICYMI, there’s a sale happening this weekend.”
  • Someone might say, “ICYMI, the new album dropped yesterday.”

54. AF

This abbreviation is used to emphasize or intensify a statement. It is often used to convey a strong emotion or to describe something in an extreme manner.

  • For example, “I’m tired AF.”
  • A person might say, “That movie was scary AF.”
  • Someone might comment, “I’m hungry AF.”

55. TL;DR

This acronym is used to provide a brief summary or synopsis of a longer piece of content. It is often used when sharing an article or post that may be too lengthy or time-consuming to read in its entirety.

  • For instance, “TL;DR: The article discusses the impact of social media on mental health.”
  • A user might comment, “TL;DR: The book is about a group of friends on a quest.”
  • Someone might say, “TL;DR: The recipe calls for three cups of flour and two eggs.”

56. BAE

This term is commonly used as a term of endearment for a romantic partner or someone close to you. It signifies that the person is the most important and beloved individual in your life.

  • For example, “I’m going out to dinner with my bae tonight.”
  • A person might post a picture with their significant other and caption it, “Date night with bae ❤️.”
  • Another might say, “I’m so lucky to have found my bae, they make me feel special every day.”

57. WTH

An abbreviation used to express surprise, confusion, or disbelief. It is a toned-down version of the stronger phrase “What the hell.”

  • For instance, “WTH, I can’t believe he said that.”
  • A person might text their friend, “WTH, did you see what just happened?”
  • Another might exclaim, “WTH, why is there a giraffe in the middle of the street?”

58. JK

Used to indicate that a previous statement was meant as a joke or not to be taken seriously. It is often used in written communication to clarify that the preceding statement was not meant to offend or cause harm.

  • For example, “I can’t believe you thought I was serious. JK!”
  • A person might comment on a friend’s photo, “You look terrible in that outfit… JK, you look amazing!”
  • Another might say, “I would never actually do that, JK, JK.”

59. RN

An abbreviation used to indicate that something is happening currently or immediately. It is often used in written communication to convey a sense of urgency or timeliness.

  • For instance, “I need to finish this report RN.”
  • A person might text their friend, “Can you call me RN? It’s important.”
  • Another might say, “I can’t talk, I’m in a meeting RN.”

60. AMA

Similar to its usage in Reddit slang, “AMA” is used to invite others to ask questions about a specific topic or experience.

  • For example, “I’m a professional chef. AMA about cooking!”
  • A person might post on social media, “Just finished running a marathon. AMA about my training.”
  • Another might say, “I’ve traveled to over 50 countries. AMA about my adventures!”

61. RIP

This is a phrase used to express condolences or commemorate someone who has died. It is often used on social media to pay tribute to someone who has passed away.

  • For example, “RIP Kobe Bryant, you will be missed.”
  • When news of a celebrity’s death breaks, people might comment, “RIP to a legend.”
  • After the passing of a loved one, someone might post, “RIP Grandma, you will always be in our hearts.”

62. FTW

This phrase is used to express enthusiasm or support for something. It is often used to show excitement or to indicate that something is the best or most favorable option.

  • For instance, “I just got tickets to the concert, FTW!”
  • When a team makes a winning play, fans might shout, “FTW!”
  • A person might comment on a delicious meal, “This pizza is amazing, FTW!”

63. HTH

This acronym is commonly used in online forums or chat conversations to indicate that the information or advice being provided is intended to be helpful.

  • For example, “I’m not sure about that, but HTH!”
  • When someone asks for directions, a person might reply, “Go straight, then turn left at the next intersection. HTH!”
  • In a discussion about troubleshooting a computer issue, someone might say, “Have you tried restarting? HTH!”

64. TY

This is a shortened version of the phrase “thank you” and is commonly used in written communication to express gratitude or appreciation.

  • For instance, “TY for the birthday wishes!”
  • When someone holds the door open for them, a person might say, “TY!”
  • After receiving a gift, someone might send a text saying, “TY for the lovely present!”

65. YW

This is a shortened version of the phrase “you’re welcome” and is commonly used in response to someone expressing gratitude.

  • For example, if someone says, “Thank you for helping me,” a person might reply, “YW!”
  • When a friend thanks them for listening, someone might respond, “YW, anytime!”
  • After doing a favor for someone, a person might say, “YW, happy to help!”

66. ROFL

This acronym is used to express extreme laughter or amusement. It is often used in online conversations or text messages.

  • For example, “That joke was hilarious, I’m ROFLing!”
  • A user might comment on a funny video, “ROFL, I can’t stop laughing!”
  • Another might say, “ROFL, that meme is too good!”

67. IANAL

This phrase is used to indicate that the person speaking is not a legal professional and their statement should not be taken as legal advice.

  • For instance, “IANAL, but I think you should consult with a lawyer for that situation.”
  • In a discussion about a legal issue, a user might say, “IANAL, but it seems like there might be a loophole in the law.”
  • Another might comment, “IANAL, but it’s always better to seek professional advice for legal matters.”

68. TIL

Similar to Reddit slang, this acronym is used to share interesting or surprising information that the user has just learned.

  • For example, “TIL that ducks have three eyelids.”
  • A user might post, “TIL that the Great Wall of China is not visible from space.”
  • Another might say, “TIL that honey never spoils.”

69. ILY

This abbreviation is used to express love or affection for someone.

  • For instance, “ILY, you mean the world to me.”
  • In a romantic conversation, a person might text, “Just wanted to say ILY.”
  • Another might comment on a friend’s post, “ILY, so proud of you!”

70. NGL

This phrase is used to indicate that the person speaking is about to be honest or share their true feelings about something.

  • For example, “NGL, that movie was not as good as I expected.”
  • A user might comment on a controversial topic, “NGL, I have mixed feelings about this.”
  • Another might say, “NGL, I’m not a fan of spicy food.”

71. IDGAF

This acronym stands for “I Don’t Give a F*ck” and is used to express a complete lack of care or concern about something.

  • For example, someone might say, “IDGAF what they think, I’m going to do it anyway.”
  • In a conversation about a trivial matter, a person might respond with, “IDGAF, it’s not important.”
  • When someone is criticizing their choices, a person might reply, “IDGAF what you think, I’m happy with my decision.”

72. GTFO

This acronym stands for “Get the F*ck Out” and is used to tell someone to leave or to express disbelief or annoyance.

  • For instance, if someone is being rude, one might say, “GTFO, I don’t have time for this.”
  • In a heated argument, a person might shout, “Why don’t you just GTFO of my life!”
  • When someone is telling a ridiculous story, a person might respond with, “GTFO, that’s not even possible!”

73. AFAIR

This acronym stands for “As Far As I Remember” and is used to indicate that the information being shared is from the speaker’s memory and may not be completely accurate.

  • For example, someone might say, “AFAIR, we met at that party last year.”
  • In a discussion about a past event, a person might say, “AFAIR, the meeting was scheduled for 3 PM.”
  • When recalling a conversation, a person might say, “AFAIR, she mentioned wanting to travel to Europe.”

74. DTF

This acronym stands for “Down to F*ck” and is used to indicate a person’s willingness or interest in engaging in sexual activity.

  • For instance, someone might ask, “Are you DTF tonight?”
  • In a conversation about someone’s romantic life, a person might say, “He’s always DTF, it’s hard to take him seriously.”
  • When discussing a potential hookup, a person might say, “I met this guy at the bar and he seemed DTF.”

75. OTOH

This acronym stands for “On the Other Hand” and is used to introduce an alternative or contrasting viewpoint or opinion.

  • For example, someone might say, “I really want to go out tonight. OTOH, I also need to finish my work.”
  • In a discussion about two different options, a person might say, “Option A seems risky, but OTOH, it could lead to great rewards.”
  • When considering the pros and cons of a decision, a person might say, “On one hand, it’s a great opportunity. OTOH, it could be a lot of work.”
See also  Top 72 Slang For Niche – Meaning & Usage