Top 56 Slang For Mentioned – Meaning & Usage

“Slang For Mentioned” may seem like a straightforward topic, but the world of slang is constantly evolving and can be a bit overwhelming to keep up with. Luckily, our team has scoured the depths of the internet to bring you a curated list of the latest and most popular slang terms that are currently making waves. Get ready to level up your slang game and stay ahead of the curve with this definitive guide. So, buckle up and get ready to dive into the vibrant world of contemporary language!

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1. Cited

When someone cites something, they are quoting or referencing it as evidence or support for their argument or statement. This term is commonly used in academic or legal contexts.

  • For example, a student might write in a research paper, “According to Smith (2019), the study cited several sources to support its findings.”
  • In a court case, a lawyer might say, “The witness cited previous case law to strengthen their argument.”
  • A news article might state, “The report cited multiple experts who agreed on the potential impact of climate change.”

2. Noted

When someone notes something, they are acknowledging or observing it. This term is often used to indicate that someone has taken notice of a particular point or detail.

  • For instance, in a meeting, someone might say, “I noted that the budget has been revised.”
  • In a conversation, one person might respond, “Noted, I will make sure to follow up on that.”
  • A supervisor might write in an email, “I noted your excellent performance on the project.”

3. Pointed out

When someone points out something, they are drawing attention to it or indicating its presence. This term is commonly used to highlight a specific detail or to bring something to someone’s attention.

  • For example, during a presentation, a speaker might say, “I would like to point out the key findings of our research.”
  • In a discussion, one person might point out, “You made an error in your calculations.”
  • A teacher might point out a mistake on a student’s paper and say, “Please correct this error.”

4. Brought up

When someone brings up something, they are introducing or mentioning it in a conversation or discussion. This term is often used to initiate a topic or to raise a point for consideration.

  • For instance, in a team meeting, a member might say, “I would like to bring up a new idea for our upcoming project.”
  • In a debate, one participant might bring up a counterargument and say, “I think it’s important to consider the potential drawbacks.”
  • A friend might bring up a funny story and say, “Remember that time we got lost on our road trip?”

5. Referred to

When someone refers to something, they are mentioning or alluding to it in a conversation or text. This term is often used to indicate that someone has made a reference or mentioned a particular point or source.

  • For example, an author might write, “In his book, the author referred to historical events to provide context.”
  • In a discussion, one person might refer to a previous study and say, “As mentioned in Smith’s research, the results were inconclusive.”
  • A speaker might refer to a famous quote and say, “As Shakespeare famously said, ‘All the world’s a stage.'”

6. Spoke of

This phrase is used to indicate that someone talked about or referred to something in passing or briefly mentioned it.

  • For example, “She spoke of her travels during the meeting.”
  • In a conversation about a book, someone might say, “He spoke of the author’s unique writing style.”
  • A news article might state, “The president spoke of the importance of education in his speech.”

7. Quoted

To “quote” means to repeat someone’s exact words, usually to provide evidence or support an argument.

  • For instance, “He quoted Shakespeare during his presentation.”
  • In a discussion about a famous speech, someone might say, “She quoted Martin Luther King Jr.’s ‘I Have a Dream’ speech.”
  • A journalist might write, “The article quoted the CEO’s statement on the company’s future plans.”

8. Made reference to

To “make reference to” means to mention or allude to something indirectly, often to provide context or support a point.

  • For example, “The professor made reference to a study that supported her theory.”
  • In a conversation about history, someone might say, “He made reference to the events leading up to World War II.”
  • A writer might include a footnote that makes reference to a previous work on the same topic.

9. Discussed

To “discuss” means to talk about something in detail, often to analyze or explore a topic.

  • For instance, “They discussed the latest trends in fashion.”
  • In a meeting about a project, someone might say, “Let’s discuss the budget allocation.”
  • A podcast episode might be titled, “We discussed the impact of social media on mental health.”

10. Commented on

To “comment on” means to share thoughts, opinions, or feedback about something.

  • For example, “She commented on the article, expressing her disagreement with the author.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might say, “I commented on the film’s cinematography and visual effects.”
  • A social media post might ask, “What do you think? Comment on this post and let us know your thoughts!”

11. Made mention of

This phrase means to bring up or discuss something briefly without going into great detail.

  • For example, during a meeting, someone might say, “I just wanted to make mention of the upcoming deadline.”
  • In a conversation about a new movie, someone might mention, “The film made mention of a popular book series.”
  • A writer might include a footnote that says, “The author made mention of this concept in a previous chapter.”

12. Touched on

This phrase means to briefly mention or discuss a topic without going into depth.

  • For instance, during a presentation, a speaker might say, “I’ll touch on this point briefly before moving on.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might mention, “We touched on the topic of international cuisine.”
  • A teacher might say, “We’ll touch on this topic in more detail in our next lesson.”

13. Called attention to

This phrase means to draw someone’s attention to something or to emphasize a particular point.

  • For example, during a presentation, a speaker might say, “I want to call attention to the importance of this statistic.”
  • In a discussion about safety, someone might mention, “The article called attention to the potential hazards.”
  • A manager might say, “I called attention to the issue during our team meeting.”

14. Remarked on

This phrase means to make a comment or statement about something.

  • For instance, during a conversation, someone might say, “She remarked on how beautiful the sunset was.”
  • In a review of a book, a critic might remark, “The author’s writing style was remarked on by many readers.”
  • A journalist might write, “The article remarked on the impact of climate change on local communities.”

15. Notified

This word means to inform someone or make them aware of something.

  • For example, during a meeting, someone might say, “I just wanted to notify everyone of the change in schedule.”
  • In a conversation about a new policy, someone might mention, “They notified us of the upcoming changes via email.”
  • A teacher might notify students of an upcoming assignment by saying, “I wanted to notify you all that the due date has been extended.”

16. Reported on

When something is reported on, it means that it has been covered or mentioned in a news article or report.

  • For example, “The news station reported on the latest developments in the investigation.”
  • A journalist might say, “I reported on the press conference and shared the details in my article.”
  • A news anchor might state, “We have just received breaking news and will be reporting on it shortly.”

17. Reiterated

When something is reiterated, it means that it has been repeated or restated, often for emphasis or clarity.

  • For instance, “The speaker reiterated the importance of voting in his speech.”
  • A teacher might say, “I have reiterated the instructions multiple times, so please pay attention.”
  • During a meeting, someone might reiterate a point by saying, “Just to be clear, we need to finish this project by Friday.”

18. Suggested

When something is suggested, it means that it has been proposed or recommended as a possible course of action or idea.

  • For example, “The committee suggested implementing new safety measures.”
  • A friend might suggest a restaurant by saying, “I’ve heard great things about this place, so let’s give it a try.”
  • A teacher might suggest a topic for a research paper by saying, “I suggest exploring the impact of technology on society.”

19. Indicated

When something is indicated, it means that it has been signaled or pointed out as evidence or a sign of something.

  • For instance, “The data indicated a significant increase in sales.”
  • A doctor might indicate a symptom by saying, “The patient’s fever indicates a possible infection.”
  • During a presentation, a speaker might use a graph to indicate a trend by saying, “As you can see, the line indicates a steady decline in revenue.”

20. Made note of

When someone makes note of something, it means that they have taken notice or acknowledged it.

  • For example, “The teacher made note of the student’s excellent presentation skills.”
  • A supervisor might make note of an employee’s hard work by saying, “I want to make note of your dedication to this project.”
  • During a meeting, someone might make note of an important deadline by saying, “Let’s all make note of the deadline for submitting our proposals.”

21. Alluded to

When someone alludes to something, they mention it in a subtle or indirect way without explicitly stating it.

  • For example, in a conversation about a surprise party, someone might say, “I heard there might be a special guest, but I won’t say who. I’ll just leave it at that.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, a person might allude to a different perspective by saying, “Some people believe there’s more to the story, but I won’t go into detail.”
  • A writer might include a hidden reference in their novel, alluding to a famous work of literature without directly mentioning it.
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22. Addressed

When someone addresses something, they speak to it or bring it up directly.

  • For instance, in a meeting, a person might address a specific concern by saying, “I’d like to talk about the budget for this project.”
  • In a speech, a speaker might address a particular issue by saying, “Let’s address the elephant in the room: climate change.”
  • A teacher might address a student’s behavior by saying, “I need to address your disruptive behavior in class.”

23. Noted down

When something is noted down, it is recorded or written down for future reference.

  • For example, in a lecture, a student might note down important points by writing them in their notebook.
  • During a conversation, a person might note down a friend’s address to remember it later.
  • A researcher might note down their observations during an experiment to ensure accuracy in their data.

24. Dropped

When something is dropped, it is mentioned casually or briefly in conversation.

  • For instance, in a discussion about upcoming plans, someone might drop a hint by saying, “I might have something exciting happening next weekend, but we’ll see.”
  • In a conversation about a recent movie, a person might drop a comment like, “I heard the ending was unexpected, but I won’t spoil it for you.”
  • A friend might drop a casual mention of a new restaurant they tried by saying, “Oh, by the way, I went to this amazing sushi place last night.”

25. Named

When something is named, it is explicitly mentioned or identified by its specific name.

  • For example, in a discussion about favorite books, a person might name their all-time favorite by saying, “To Kill a Mockingbird is my top pick.”
  • In a debate, a person might name a specific statistic to support their argument by saying, “According to this study, 90% of people agree with my viewpoint.”
  • A journalist might name an individual involved in a news story by saying, “John Smith, a prominent businessman, was named as the suspect in the investigation.”

26. Talked of

This term refers to something that has been mentioned or brought up in conversation. It indicates that a topic or subject has been talked about, either briefly or extensively.

  • For example, “The new movie release is being talked of as a potential blockbuster.”
  • In a news article, the writer might state, “The issue of climate change was talked of extensively during the conference.”
  • A friend might say, “We talked of our plans for the weekend during lunch.”

27. Referred

When someone refers to something, they are mentioning or alluding to it. This term implies that a specific person, thing, or topic has been mentioned in a conversation or discussion.

  • For instance, “He referred to a book he had read during his presentation.”
  • In a debate, a participant might say, “I referred to several studies that support my argument.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Can you refer to a specific example from the text?”

28. Put forward

To put forward means to propose or suggest something. It indicates that an idea, opinion, or proposal has been presented for consideration or discussion.

  • For example, “She put forward a new strategy to improve sales.”
  • During a team meeting, someone might say, “I would like to put forward the idea of implementing flexible work hours.”
  • A politician might put forward a bill in parliament for consideration.
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29. Made allusion to

When someone makes an allusion to something, they are hinting at or referencing it indirectly. This term suggests that a person has mentioned or referred to something without explicitly stating it.

  • For instance, “She made an allusion to a famous movie scene during her speech.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “He made an allusion to our shared childhood memories.”
  • A writer might include an allusion to a classic novel in their story.

30. Touched upon

To touch upon means to mention or bring up something briefly or lightly in conversation. This term implies that a topic or subject has been mentioned in passing without going into great detail.

  • For example, “The speaker touched upon the importance of environmental conservation.”
  • During a lecture, the professor might say, “I will touch upon this topic in more detail in the next class.”
  • A friend might mention, “We touched upon our upcoming vacation plans during our phone call.”

31. Made a point of

To “make a point of” something means to emphasize or highlight it, often in order to ensure that it is noticed or understood.

  • For example, “During the presentation, the speaker made a point of emphasizing the importance of teamwork.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I want to make a point of saying how impressed I am with your work.”
  • A manager might instruct their team, “Let’s make a point of providing excellent customer service at all times.”

32. Made a remark about

To “make a remark about” something means to comment or say something about it.

  • For instance, “During the meeting, she made a remark about the new company policy.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might say, “He made a funny remark about the party decorations.”
  • A person might make a remark about someone’s outfit, saying, “I love your dress! You look fantastic.”

33. Made a note of

To “make a note of” something means to remember or take note of it for future reference.

  • For example, “I made a note of her phone number so I can call her later.”
  • When studying, a student might say, “I made a note of the main points in my notebook.”
  • A person might make a note of an important deadline, saying, “I need to make a note of the due date for this project.”

34. Made a statement about

To “make a statement about” something means to express an opinion or position on it.

  • For instance, “The company CEO made a statement about the recent changes in the industry.”
  • During a debate, someone might say, “I want to make a statement about the importance of education.”
  • A public figure might make a statement about a current event, saying, “I wanted to make a statement about the need for climate action.”

35. Made a reference to

To “make a reference to” something means to mention or allude to it, often in order to provide additional context or support.

  • For example, “In his speech, the professor made a reference to a famous study on human behavior.”
  • During a conversation, someone might say, “She made a reference to a movie we watched together.”
  • A writer might make a reference to a historical event in their book, saying, “The author made a reference to World War II in this chapter.”

36. Made a mention of

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has mentioned or brought up a particular topic or subject in a conversation or discussion.

  • For example, “During the meeting, she made a mention of the upcoming project.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “Can we make a mention of the budget constraints?”
  • When discussing a book, a reader might say, “The author made a mention of the main character’s troubled past.”

37. Made a comment about

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has made a comment or shared their thoughts on a particular topic or subject.

  • For instance, “He made a comment about the new restaurant in town.”
  • In a social media post, someone might say, “Just wanted to make a comment about how amazing this concert was!”
  • During a discussion about politics, a participant might make a comment about a specific policy proposal.

38. Made an allusion to

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has made an indirect reference or allusion to a particular topic or subject.

  • For example, “The speaker made an allusion to a famous quote.”
  • In a literature analysis, a student might say, “The author made an allusion to Greek mythology in this passage.”
  • During a conversation about history, someone might make an allusion to a significant historical event.

39. Made an observation about

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has made an observation or noted something about a particular topic or subject.

  • For instance, “She made an observation about the changing weather patterns.”
  • During a nature walk, someone might say, “I made an observation about the different types of birds in this area.”
  • In a scientific study, researchers might make observations about the behavior of a specific species.

40. Stated

This word is used to indicate that someone has expressed or stated something in a straightforward and direct manner.

  • For example, “He stated his opinion on the matter during the meeting.”
  • In a debate, a participant might state their argument clearly and concisely.
  • When giving a presentation, a speaker might state the key points of their talk.

41. Remarked

This word is used to describe making a comment or statement about something.

  • For example, “She remarked on how beautiful the sunset was.”
  • In a conversation about a book, someone might say, “The author remarked that the story was inspired by real events.”
  • A person might remark, “I can’t believe how much she has grown since I last saw her.”

42. Referenced

To reference something means to mention or allude to it in a conversation or piece of writing.

  • For instance, “He referenced a famous quote during his speech.”
  • In an academic paper, a student might write, “The author referenced several studies to support their argument.”
  • A person might say, “I referenced the book you recommended in my presentation.”

43. Notable

This word is used to describe something or someone that is worthy of attention or mention.

  • For example, “The film received several notable awards.”
  • In a discussion about influential figures, someone might say, “She is a notable scientist in her field.”
  • A person might mention, “There were several notable events that occurred during the conference.”

44. Pointed to

To point to something means to draw attention to it or indicate its relevance.

  • For instance, “He pointed to the evidence that supported his argument.”
  • In a conversation about a map, someone might say, “The arrow pointed to the location of the treasure.”
  • A person might indicate, “Her actions pointed to her guilt in the crime.”

45. Spoke about

This phrase is used to indicate that someone talked or had a conversation about a specific topic.

  • For example, “They spoke about their plans for the weekend.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s take a moment to speak about the upcoming project.”
  • A person might discuss, “We spoke about the issue and came up with a solution.”

46. Made a citation of

This phrase refers to including a direct quote from a source in a piece of writing or speech. It implies that the speaker or writer has referenced a specific source to support their argument or provide evidence.

  • For example, in an academic paper, a student might write, “I made a citation of Smith’s research to support my claim.”
  • In a news article, a journalist might write, “The author made a citation of the study’s findings to highlight the importance of the issue.”
  • During a debate, a participant might say, “I made a citation of the expert’s testimony to counter the opposing argument.”

47. Made a quotation of

This phrase means using someone’s exact words to convey a specific idea or to support a statement. It indicates that the speaker or writer has directly quoted another person’s words.

  • For instance, in a book review, the author might write, “The critic made a quotation of the author’s description to illustrate the book’s vivid imagery.”
  • In a speech, a speaker might say, “I made a quotation of the President’s remarks to emphasize the importance of the issue.”
  • In a research paper, a student might write, “I made a quotation of the scientist’s hypothesis to provide evidence for my experiment.”

48. Made a remark on

This phrase means to make a comment or express an opinion about a particular topic or situation. It implies that the speaker or writer has shared their thoughts or observations on a specific matter.

  • For example, in a meeting, a participant might say, “I made a remark on the proposed changes to the project.”
  • During a conversation, someone might say, “She made a remark on the weather, saying it was unusually hot for this time of year.”
  • In a blog post, a writer might write, “I made a remark on the latest fashion trends, expressing my personal style preferences.”

49. Made a statement on

This phrase refers to expressing a specific opinion, belief, or position on a particular matter. It implies that the speaker or writer has made a formal declaration or announcement of their stance.

  • For instance, in a press conference, a spokesperson might say, “The company made a statement on the recent allegations, denying any wrongdoing.”
  • In a political debate, a candidate might say, “I made a statement on the issue of healthcare, advocating for universal coverage.”
  • In a social media post, a user might write, “I made a statement on the importance of mental health awareness, sharing my personal experiences.”

50. Made a reference on

This phrase means mentioning or alluding to a particular person, thing, or idea. It implies that the speaker or writer has included a reference to provide additional information or context.

  • For example, in a research paper, a student might write, “I made a reference on Darwin’s theory of evolution to support my argument.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “He made a reference on the movie, suggesting it as a good example of the genre.”
  • In a presentation, a speaker might say, “I made a reference on the historical event, highlighting its significance in shaping the current situation.”

51. Made a comment on

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has left a comment or expressed their thoughts on a particular topic or statement. It implies that the person has engaged in a discussion or conversation.

  • For example, “I made a comment on the article about climate change.”
  • A user might say, “I made a comment on the post asking for recommendations.”
  • Someone might mention, “I made a comment on the video expressing my disagreement with the speaker’s views.”

52. Made an observation on

This phrase suggests that someone has observed or noticed something and has made a statement or comment about it. It implies that the person has paid attention to details or specific aspects.

  • For instance, “I made an observation on the behavior of the crowd at the concert.”
  • A person might say, “I made an observation on the changes in my friend’s mood.”
  • Someone might mention, “I made an observation on the pattern of the birds’ migration.”

53. Made a mention on

This phrase indicates that someone has mentioned or brought up a particular topic or subject in a conversation or discussion. It implies that the person has referred to or included something in their communication.

  • For example, “I made a mention on the topic of climate change during the meeting.”
  • A person might say, “I made a mention on the latest news article in our conversation.”
  • Someone might mention, “I made a mention on the importance of exercise during the presentation.”

54. Made an allusion on

This phrase suggests that someone has made an indirect or subtle reference to something in their communication. It implies that the person has hinted at or implied a connection or similarity.

  • For instance, “I made an allusion on the famous painting in my poem.”
  • A person might say, “I made an allusion on a popular movie in my speech.”
  • Someone might mention, “I made an allusion on a historical event in my storytelling.”

55. Made a citation upon

This phrase indicates that someone has quoted or referenced a specific source or authority in their communication. It implies that the person has used a direct quotation or mentioned a source to support their statement.

  • For example, “I made a citation upon a scientific study to support my argument.”
  • A person might say, “I made a citation upon a famous book in my essay.”
  • Someone might mention, “I made a citation upon a legal case in my presentation.”

56. Made a quotation upon

This phrase refers to the act of quoting someone or something in a conversation or discussion. It is often used when referencing or repeating something that someone else has said.

  • For example, during a debate, one person might say, “I made a quotation upon what the expert said earlier.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might add, “I want to make a quotation upon the point that was just made.”
  • A person might mention, “I made a quotation upon that article I read yesterday, it had some interesting points.”