Top 59 Slang For Minorities – Meaning & Usage

In a world where language is constantly evolving, staying up-to-date with the latest slang terms can be a challenge. Exploring slang for minorities opens up a window into diverse cultures and communities, offering a glimpse into the vibrant and dynamic ways in which people express themselves. Join us as we uncover some of the most popular and impactful slang terms used by minority groups, shedding light on the richness and diversity of language.

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1. POC

This term refers to individuals who are not part of the white racial group. It encompasses a diverse range of ethnicities and backgrounds.

  • For example, a person might say, “As a POC, I have experienced discrimination firsthand.”
  • In a discussion about representation in media, someone might comment, “It’s important to amplify the voices of POC.”
  • A person might use the term to describe a social event, saying, “The conference aims to create a safe space for POC to share their experiences.”

2. BIPOC

This acronym is used to specifically highlight the experiences and struggles of Black and Indigenous individuals, in addition to other people of color. It recognizes the unique challenges faced by these communities.

  • For instance, someone might say, “We need to address the systemic racism faced by BIPOC.”
  • In a discussion about representation in the media, a person might comment, “We need more BIPOC voices in positions of power.”
  • A person might use the term to describe a social event, saying, “The workshop is open to all, but it will focus on the experiences of BIPOC.”

3. WOC

This term specifically refers to women who are not part of the white racial group. It recognizes the intersectionality of race and gender and the unique experiences faced by women of color.

  • For example, a person might say, “We need to uplift the voices of WOC in feminist movements.”
  • In a discussion about representation in leadership positions, someone might comment, “We need more WOC in positions of power.”
  • A person might use the term to describe a social event, saying, “The conference aims to address the specific challenges faced by WOC in the workplace.”

4. AAPI

This acronym encompasses a diverse group of individuals with Asian and Pacific Islander heritage. It recognizes the shared experiences and challenges faced by these communities.

  • For instance, someone might say, “AAPI communities have made significant contributions to American society.”
  • In a discussion about representation in media, a person might comment, “We need more AAPI representation in Hollywood.”
  • A person might use the term to describe a social event, saying, “The festival celebrates the rich cultural heritage of AAPI communities.”

5. Latinx

This term is used to refer to individuals of Latin American descent in a gender-neutral way. It aims to be inclusive of all gender identities within the Latinx community.

  • For example, a person might say, “Latinx individuals face unique challenges in today’s society.”
  • In a discussion about representation in media, someone might comment, “We need more Latinx voices in the entertainment industry.”
  • A person might use the term to describe a social event, saying, “The organization is hosting a Latinx heritage celebration.”

6. Desi

Desi is a term used to refer to people of South Asian descent, particularly those from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. It is a way for South Asians to identify with their cultural heritage and community.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going to a Desi wedding this weekend.”
  • In a discussion about Indian cuisine, someone might mention, “I love Desi food, especially butter chicken.”
  • A South Asian person might proudly declare, “I’m Desi, and I’m proud of my heritage.”

7. Chicanx

Chicanx is a gender-neutral term used to describe individuals of Mexican descent who identify as neither male nor female. It is an inclusive term that acknowledges the diversity within the Mexican-American community.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I identify as Chicanx because it represents my non-binary gender identity.”
  • In a discussion about Chicano/a/x literature, someone might mention, “Chicanx authors are telling important stories of the Mexican-American experience.”
  • An activist might use the term Chicanx to advocate for gender equality within the community.

8. Indigenous

Indigenous refers to the original inhabitants of a particular region or land. It is a term used to recognize and honor the native cultures and peoples who have lived in a place for thousands of years.

  • For example, a person might say, “I am proud of my Indigenous heritage.”
  • In a discussion about land rights, someone might mention, “Indigenous peoples have a deep connection to the land and should have a say in its use.”
  • An Indigenous activist might use the term to advocate for the preservation of traditional practices and cultural identity.

9. Blasian

Blasian is a term used to describe individuals who have both Black and Asian heritage. It is a way for people with mixed racial backgrounds to identify and connect with others who share similar experiences.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m proud to be Blasian because it represents my multicultural identity.”
  • In a discussion about representation in media, someone might mention, “Blasian actors are breaking barriers and challenging stereotypes.”
  • A Blasian person might use the term to express pride in their unique heritage.

10. Afro-Latino

Afro-Latino is a term used to describe individuals who have both African and Latino heritage. It recognizes the intersectionality of race and ethnicity and acknowledges the diverse experiences of Black people within the Latino community.

  • For example, a person might say, “I identify as Afro-Latino because it reflects my dual heritage.”
  • In a discussion about Afro-Latino culture, someone might mention, “Afro-Latino music and dance have had a significant impact on global culture.”
  • An Afro-Latino person might use the term to affirm their identity and challenge stereotypes.

11. Hapa

Hapa is a term used to describe a person of mixed Asian and Pacific Islander heritage. It is derived from the Hawaiian word “hapa,” which means “part” or “mixed.” The term is often used to celebrate and acknowledge the diversity and cultural heritage of individuals with mixed racial backgrounds.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m hapa, my mom is Japanese and my dad is Hawaiian.”
  • In a discussion about identity, someone might share, “Being hapa means I get to experience the best of both cultures.”
  • Another person might ask, “Are there any hapa celebrities that I should know about?”

12. Mestizo

Mestizo is a term used to describe a person of mixed European and Indigenous American heritage. It is commonly used in Latin American countries to acknowledge and celebrate the blending of different cultures and ethnicities.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m proud to be mestizo, it represents my mixed heritage.”
  • In a conversation about cultural diversity, a person might ask, “What are some traditional customs of mestizo communities?”
  • Another person might share, “Being mestizo has given me a unique perspective on the world.”

13. Mulatto

Mulatto is an outdated term used to describe a person of mixed African and European heritage. While the term was historically used in a derogatory manner, it has been reclaimed by some individuals as a way to embrace and celebrate their mixed racial background.

  • For example, someone might say, “I identify as mulatto because it represents my African and European ancestry.”
  • In a discussion about racial identity, a person might argue, “Using the term mulatto perpetuates harmful stereotypes and should be avoided.”
  • Another person might share, “I have faced discrimination because of my mulatto heritage, but I am proud of who I am.”

14. Creole

Creole is a term used to describe a person of mixed European and African heritage, particularly in the Caribbean and Louisiana. It also refers to a distinct cultural group that emerged from the blending of different ethnicities and cultures.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I come from a Creole family with roots in Haiti.”
  • In a conversation about cultural diversity, a person might ask, “What are some traditional Creole dishes?”
  • Another person might share, “Creole culture is a unique blend of African, European, and Caribbean influences.”

15. Gypsy

Gypsy is a term historically used to refer to the Romani people, an ethnic group with origins in South Asia and a nomadic lifestyle. However, it is important to note that the term is considered derogatory by many and should be used with caution. It is more appropriate to use the term Romani or refer to specific cultural groups within the Romani community.

  • For example, someone might say, “My grandmother is Romani, and she has shared stories of her nomadic upbringing.”
  • In a discussion about cultural sensitivity, a person might argue, “Using the term Gypsy perpetuates stereotypes and should be avoided.”
  • Another person might share, “The Romani community has a rich cultural heritage and diverse traditions.”

16. Queer

Queer is an umbrella term used to describe individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or other non-heterosexual or non-cisgender identities. It is a reclaimed term that is used to empower and celebrate the LGBTQ+ community.

  • For example, someone might say, “I identify as queer because it encompasses my fluid sexual orientation.”
  • A person discussing LGBTQ+ rights might say, “Queer people deserve equal rights and protections.”
  • In a supportive conversation, someone might say, “I’m here to support my queer friends and loved ones.”

17. Two-Spirit

Two-Spirit is a term used by many Indigenous peoples to describe individuals who embody both masculine and feminine qualities. It is a term that is deeply rooted in Indigenous cultures and is often associated with spiritual and cultural significance.

  • For instance, an Indigenous person might say, “Two-Spirit people have unique gifts and perspectives to offer.”
  • In a discussion about gender diversity, someone might say, “The concept of Two-Spirit challenges the binary understanding of gender.”
  • An advocate for Indigenous rights might say, “Recognizing and honoring Two-Spirit identities is essential for respecting Indigenous cultures.”

18. Hijabi

Hijabi is a term used to refer to Muslim women who wear the hijab, a headscarf worn as a symbol of modesty and religious identity. It is a term that is specific to Muslim women and their choice to cover their hair.

  • For example, someone might say, “She is a proud hijabi who embraces her faith.”
  • In a discussion about religious freedom, someone might say, “Muslim women have the right to choose whether or not to be hijabis.”
  • A person discussing cultural diversity might say, “The hijabi community is diverse and encompasses various cultural backgrounds.”

19. Sikh

Sikh is a term used to describe individuals who follow Sikhism, a monotheistic religion founded in the Punjab region of India. Sikhs are known for their distinctive appearance, including turbans and uncut hair, and their commitment to equality, justice, and community service.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He is a proud Sikh who lives by the principles of Sikhism.”
  • In a discussion about religious tolerance, someone might say, “Sikhs face discrimination and misunderstanding due to their appearance.”
  • A person discussing Sikh values might say, “Sikhs believe in serving humanity and promoting social justice.”

20. Amish

Amish is a term used to describe a group of traditionalist Christian church fellowships that are part of the Anabaptist movement. The Amish are known for their simple and traditional way of life, which includes rejecting modern technology and living in close-knit agricultural communities.

  • For example, someone might say, “The Amish prioritize community and reject many aspects of modern society.”
  • In a discussion about sustainable living, someone might say, “The Amish lifestyle emphasizes self-sufficiency and minimal environmental impact.”
  • A person discussing religious diversity might say, “The Amish are a unique and distinct religious group within the broader Christian tradition.”

21. Rastafarian

A member of the Rastafari movement, which originated in Jamaica in the 1930s. Rastafarians believe in the divinity of Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia and follow a lifestyle that includes the ritual use of marijuana.

  • For example, “Bob Marley was a famous Rastafarian musician.”
  • In a discussion about religious beliefs, someone might say, “Rastafarians have a unique perspective on spirituality.”
  • A person interested in exploring different cultures might ask, “Can you tell me more about Rastafarian traditions?”

22. Hasidic

A follower of Hasidism, a Jewish religious movement that originated in Eastern Europe in the 18th century. Hasidic Jews emphasize spirituality, prayer, and the study of Jewish texts.

  • For instance, “Hasidic Jews often wear distinctive clothing, such as black hats and long coats.”
  • In a conversation about different Jewish sects, someone might say, “Hasidic communities have their own unique customs and practices.”
  • A person interested in learning more about Judaism might ask, “Can you recommend any books about Hasidic philosophy?”

23. Druze

A member of the Druze religion, which originated in the 11th century in the Middle East. Druze beliefs are secretive and only shared with initiates. They are known for their strong sense of community and loyalty to their fellow Druze.

  • For example, “Druze communities can be found in Lebanon, Syria, and Israel.”
  • In a discussion about religious diversity, someone might say, “The Druze religion is often misunderstood by outsiders.”
  • A person interested in Middle Eastern history might ask, “What are some important events in Druze history?”

24. Zoroastrian

A follower of Zoroastrianism, one of the world’s oldest religions, founded by the prophet Zoroaster in ancient Persia. Zoroastrians believe in the duality of good and evil and strive to lead a righteous life.

  • For instance, “Zoroastrians worship in fire temples and consider fire a symbol of purity.”
  • In a conversation about ancient civilizations, someone might say, “Zoroastrianism had a significant influence on Persian culture.”
  • A person interested in exploring different religions might ask, “What are some key Zoroastrian beliefs and practices?”

25. Jain

A follower of Jainism, an ancient Indian religion that emphasizes non-violence, truth, and non-attachment to material possessions. Jains believe in the existence of eternal souls and practice strict vegetarianism.

  • For example, “Jains often wear masks to avoid accidentally harming insects or other small creatures.”
  • In a discussion about religious philosophies, someone might say, “Jainism promotes a deep respect for all forms of life.”
  • A person interested in ethical living might ask, “What are some practical ways to incorporate Jain principles into daily life?”

26. Hare Krishna

Hare Krishna is a term used to refer to devotees of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON). It is derived from the mantra “Hare Krishna,” which is a chant used in Krishna worship. The term is often used to describe individuals who follow the teachings and practices of ISKCON.

  • For example, “He is a Hare Krishna devotee and regularly attends the temple.”
  • In a discussion about different religious groups, someone might say, “Hare Krishna is a sect within Hinduism.”
  • A person might mention, “I have a friend who is a Hare Krishna and they follow a strict vegetarian diet.”

27. Black

Black is a term used to describe individuals with African or African-American heritage. It is often used as an ethnic identifier and can refer to a person’s racial background.

  • For instance, “She is a proud black woman and advocates for racial equality.”
  • In a discussion about diversity, someone might say, “Representation of black voices in media is crucial.”
  • A person might mention, “Black culture has made significant contributions to art, music, and literature.”

28. Brown

Brown is a term used to describe individuals with South Asian, Middle Eastern, or Hispanic heritage. It is often used as an ethnic identifier and can refer to a person’s racial background.

  • For example, “He is a first-generation brown immigrant.”
  • In a discussion about cultural diversity, someone might say, “Brown communities enrich our society with their traditions and perspectives.”
  • A person might mention, “Brown people face unique challenges and discrimination in society.”

29. Yellow

Yellow is a term used to describe individuals with East Asian heritage. It is often used as an ethnic identifier and can refer to a person’s racial background.

  • For instance, “She is proud of her yellow heritage and celebrates it through cultural events.”
  • In a discussion about representation, someone might say, “Yellow characters in media should be portrayed authentically and without stereotypes.”
  • A person might mention, “Yellow communities have a rich history and diverse cultures.”

30. White-passing

White-passing is a term used to describe individuals who have predominantly Caucasian physical features but may have non-Caucasian heritage. It refers to individuals who may be perceived as white based on their appearance, despite having a mixed racial background.

  • For example, “She is white-passing but identifies as multiracial.”
  • In a discussion about privilege, someone might say, “White-passing individuals may experience certain advantages due to their perceived whiteness.”
  • A person might mention, “White-passing individuals often navigate complex identities and may face challenges in claiming their non-Caucasian heritage.”

31. Mixed-race

This term refers to individuals who have parents of different races or ethnicities. It acknowledges the diversity of their heritage and identity.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m proud to be mixed-race because it allows me to experience different cultures.”
  • In a discussion about representation, a person might note, “We need more mixed-race characters in media to reflect the reality of our society.”
  • A person discussing their identity might say, “Being mixed-race gives me a unique perspective on the world.”

32. LGBTQ+

This acronym represents a diverse community of individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, and more. It encompasses a range of sexual orientations and gender identities.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m proud to be part of the LGBTQ+ community and embrace my true self.”
  • In a discussion about LGBTQ+ rights, someone might argue, “We need to ensure equal rights and protections for all members of the LGBTQ+ community.”
  • A person discussing their coming out journey might say, “Coming to terms with my LGBTQ+ identity was a transformative experience.”

33. Cis

This term refers to individuals whose gender identity matches the sex they were assigned at birth. It is the opposite of transgender and is used to describe people who are not transgender.

  • For example, someone might say, “As a cisgender person, I don’t face the same challenges as my transgender friends.”
  • In a discussion about gender, a person might note, “It’s important for cis individuals to educate themselves about transgender issues.”
  • A person discussing their own gender identity might say, “Growing up, I always felt comfortable in my cisgender identity.”

34. Non-binary

This term describes individuals who do not exclusively identify as male or female. Non-binary people may identify as both, neither, a combination of genders, or as a different gender entirely.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m non-binary and use they/them pronouns to reflect my gender identity.”
  • In a discussion about gender diversity, a person might argue, “We need to create more inclusive spaces for non-binary individuals.”
  • A person discussing their own gender journey might say, “Discovering and embracing my non-binary identity has been empowering.”

35. Trans

This term refers to individuals whose gender identity differs from the sex they were assigned at birth. Transgender people often undergo a social, medical, or legal transition to live in alignment with their true gender.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m trans and have finally found happiness living as my authentic self.”
  • In a discussion about transgender rights, a person might argue, “Trans individuals deserve equal rights and protections under the law.”
  • A person discussing their transition might say, “Transitioning has allowed me to live a more fulfilling and authentic life.”

36. Ally

An ally is someone who supports and advocates for marginalized communities, often using their privilege to help amplify their voices and fight for their rights.

  • For example, “She is a strong ally for the LGBTQ+ community, attending rallies and speaking out against discrimination.”
  • A person might say, “I’m committed to being an ally to the Black Lives Matter movement and educating myself on systemic racism.”
  • In a discussion about feminism, someone might ask, “How can men be better allies to women in the workplace?”

37. Refugee

A refugee is someone who has been forced to leave their home country due to persecution, war, or violence and seeks safety and protection in another country.

  • For instance, “She fled her war-torn country and sought refugee status in a neighboring nation.”
  • In a conversation about immigration policies, someone might say, “We need to provide support and resources for refugees fleeing dangerous situations.”
  • A news article might report, “Thousands of refugees are currently living in temporary camps, awaiting resettlement.”

38. Immigrant

An immigrant is someone who permanently moves to a new country in order to establish a home and a better life for themselves and their family.

  • For example, “Her parents immigrated to the United States from Mexico in search of better opportunities.”
  • In a discussion about cultural diversity, someone might say, “Immigrants bring unique perspectives and enrich our society.”
  • A news headline might read, “New immigration policies aim to streamline the process for skilled immigrants.”

39. Expat

An expat is someone who temporarily or permanently lives in a country other than their own, often for work or personal reasons.

  • For instance, “He moved to Japan for a job opportunity and has been living there as an expat for the past five years.”
  • In a conversation about living abroad, someone might say, “Being an expat can be both exciting and challenging, as you navigate a new culture and language.”
  • A travel blog might feature an article titled, “Tips for thriving as an expat in a foreign country.”

40. Dreamer

The term “Dreamer” refers to undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children and have grown up in the country, often aspiring to pursue higher education and contribute to society.

  • For example, “She is a Dreamer, working hard to achieve her dreams despite facing challenges due to her immigration status.”
  • In a discussion about immigration reform, someone might argue, “We need to create a pathway to citizenship for Dreamers who have grown up in the United States.”
  • A news report might highlight the stories of Dreamers who have overcome obstacles to achieve success.
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41. Minority

This term refers to a group of people who are in a smaller or less powerful position within a society. It is often used to describe racial or ethnic groups that are not part of the dominant culture.

  • For instance, “Minority groups face unique challenges in accessing education and healthcare.”
  • In a discussion about representation in media, one might say, “We need more diverse voices from minority communities.”
  • A person advocating for equal rights might state, “It is important to address the systemic barriers faced by minority populations.”

42. Jewess

This term is used to refer to a female Jewish person. It is a combination of the word “Jew” and the suffix “-ess,” which is used to indicate female gender.

  • For example, “She is proud to identify as a Jewess and celebrates Jewish traditions.”
  • In a conversation about cultural heritage, one might say, “The Jewess in my family has passed down incredible recipes.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you know any Jewess-owned businesses in the area?”

43. Sista

This term is used within African American communities as a way to refer to or address a fellow black woman. It is a term of endearment and camaraderie.

  • For instance, “Hey sista, can you help me out with this?”
  • In a conversation about shared experiences, one might say, “We need to support our sistas in the fight for social justice.”
  • A person expressing solidarity might state, “Black lives matter, and we stand with our sistas.”

44. Brotha

This term is used within African American communities as a way to refer to or address a fellow black man. It is a term of camaraderie and kinship.

  • For example, “What’s up, brotha? Long time no see!”
  • In a conversation about supporting each other, one might say, “We need to uplift our brothas and provide opportunities for success.”
  • Another might express pride, “I’m proud to be a brotha and part of the black community.”

45. Chicano

This term refers to a person of Mexican descent who is born or living in the United States. It is often used to describe individuals who embrace both Mexican and American cultural identities.

  • For instance, “He identifies as a Chicano and celebrates his Mexican heritage.”
  • In a discussion about immigration, one might say, “Chicanos have contributed greatly to the fabric of American society.”
  • A person expressing cultural pride might state, “I love being Chicano and honoring my roots.”

46. FOB

This term is often used to describe immigrants or individuals who have recently arrived in a new country. It can be used to refer to someone who is new to a particular culture or who still has strong ties to their home country.

  • For example, someone might say, “She’s a FOB from China, so she’s still learning English.”
  • In a conversation about cultural assimilation, one might comment, “Being a FOB can be challenging when trying to fit into a new society.”
  • Another might say, “I’m a FOB myself, and I’m proud of my heritage while also embracing my new home.”

47. Oreo

This term is used to describe a Black person who is perceived as acting or behaving in a way that is more aligned with White culture or values. It implies that the person is not “Black enough” or is trying to distance themselves from their racial identity.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s such an Oreo, always hanging out with White people and listening to rock music.”
  • In a discussion about racial stereotypes, one might comment, “The Oreo stereotype is harmful because it disregards the diversity within the Black community.”
  • Another might say, “As a Black person, I shouldn’t have to conform to anyone’s expectations of how I should behave. I can be myself without being labeled an Oreo.”

48. Coconut

Similar to the term “Oreo,” this slang is used to describe individuals of Asian or Pacific Islander descent who are perceived as acting or behaving in a way that is more aligned with White culture or values. It implies that the person is not “Asian enough” or is trying to distance themselves from their cultural identity.

  • For example, someone might say, “She’s such a coconut, always speaking English and not embracing her Asian heritage.”
  • In a conversation about cultural assimilation, one might comment, “The coconut stereotype overlooks the complexity of individuals’ cultural identities.”
  • Another might say, “It’s important to recognize that people can embody different aspects of their cultural heritage without being labeled a coconut.”

49. Twinkie

This term is used to describe individuals of East Asian descent who are perceived as acting or behaving in a way that is more aligned with White culture or values. It implies that the person is not “Asian enough” or is trying to distance themselves from their cultural identity.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s such a Twinkie, always speaking English and not participating in Asian traditions.”
  • In a discussion about cultural identity, one might comment, “The Twinkie stereotype oversimplifies the experiences of individuals from East Asian backgrounds.”
  • Another might say, “It’s important to recognize that cultural identity is complex, and people should be allowed to express themselves authentically without being judged as a Twinkie.”

50. Middle Eastern

This is a derogatory term used to refer to people of Middle Eastern descent. It is offensive and promotes racial discrimination.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t believe he called me a sand n***** just because of my ethnicity.”
  • In a discussion about racial stereotypes, a person might mention, “Middle Eastern individuals often face prejudice and are sometimes referred to as sand n*****.”
  • It is important to note that using this term is highly disrespectful and should be avoided at all costs.
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51. GNC

This term is used to describe individuals whose gender identity or expression does not conform to traditional expectations of masculinity or femininity. It is an inclusive term that recognizes and respects the diversity of gender identities.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I identify as GNC because I don’t feel comfortable with the gender binary.”
  • In a discussion about LGBTQ+ rights, someone might mention, “It is important to create safe spaces for GNC individuals where they can express themselves freely.”
  • GNC individuals often face discrimination and prejudice, so it is crucial to be respectful and supportive.

52. DACA recipient

This term refers to individuals who are recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in the United States. It is used to highlight their aspirations and dreams for a better future.

  • For example, a person might say, “As a DACA recipient, I am grateful for the opportunities this program has given me.”
  • In a discussion about immigration policies, someone might mention, “We need to protect the rights of Dreamers and provide them with a pathway to citizenship.”
  • It is important to recognize the contributions and resilience of DACA recipients and advocate for their rights.

53. Disabled

This term is used to describe individuals who have physical, sensory, intellectual, or developmental impairments. It emphasizes their abilities and challenges the notion of disability as a limitation.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I prefer to be called differently-abled because it focuses on what I can do rather than what I can’t.”
  • In a discussion about accessibility, someone might mention, “We need to ensure that public spaces are inclusive and accommodate the needs of differently-abled individuals.”
  • It is important to use respectful language and avoid using derogatory terms when referring to individuals with disabilities.
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54. Deaf

This term is used to describe individuals who have partial or complete hearing loss. It acknowledges the diversity within the deaf community and recognizes that not all individuals have the same level of hearing impairment.

  • For example, a person might say, “I am hard of hearing, which means I have some hearing loss but can still communicate verbally.”
  • In a discussion about accessibility, someone might mention, “We need to provide sign language interpreters for deaf and hard of hearing individuals.”
  • It is important to be sensitive to the needs and preferences of deaf individuals and ensure effective communication.

55. Neurodivergent

This term refers to individuals whose neurological development and functioning are atypical. It encompasses a range of conditions such as autism, ADHD, and dyslexia, among others. Neurodivergent is used to emphasize and celebrate the diversity in neurological functioning.

  • For example, a person might say, “I identify as neurodivergent because I have ADHD.”
  • In a discussion about inclusivity, someone might advocate for “creating a neurodivergent-friendly workplace.”
  • A support group for individuals with autism might use the term to describe their community, saying, “We welcome all neurodivergent individuals to join us.”

56. Fat

While “fat” is often used as a derogatory term, it is also reclaimed by some individuals as a neutral or positive descriptor for their body size. It challenges societal beauty standards and promotes body acceptance.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m fat, and I love my body just the way it is.”
  • In a body-positive movement, someone might declare, “Fat is not a bad word; it’s just a description.”
  • A clothing brand might advertise, “We offer stylish and trendy options for all body types, including fat individuals.”

57. Plus-size

This term refers to individuals whose body size falls outside the traditional fashion industry’s standards of “straight-size.” It is often used as a more inclusive and positive alternative to “fat” or “overweight.”

  • For example, a person might say, “I embrace my plus-size body and celebrate my curves.”
  • In a discussion about representation, someone might argue, “We need more plus-size models on magazine covers.”
  • A fashion brand might promote their inclusive sizing options, saying, “We offer stylish and trendy clothing for all sizes, including curvy individuals.”

58. Intersex

Intersex is a term used to describe individuals who are born with reproductive or sexual anatomy that does not fit typical definitions of male or female. It acknowledges and respects the natural variations in human biology.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I am intersex and proud of my unique identity.”
  • In a conversation about gender diversity, someone might explain, “Intersex individuals challenge the binary understanding of gender.”
  • A support group for intersex individuals might use the term to describe their community, saying, “We provide a safe space for intersex people to share their experiences and find support.”

59. Undocumented

This term refers to individuals who live in a country without legal immigration status. It is used to highlight the complex and often challenging situations faced by individuals who lack proper documentation.

  • For example, a person might say, “I am undocumented, but I contribute to my community in many ways.”
  • In a discussion about immigration policies, someone might argue, “We need to find a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants.”
  • An advocacy group might use the term to describe their work, saying, “We provide legal support and resources for undocumented individuals seeking a better life.”