Top 32 Slang For Mitigate – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to finding the right words to express the act of reducing or lessening something, the English language offers a variety of slang terms for “mitigate.” Whether you’re looking to spice up your vocabulary or simply stay in the loop with the latest linguistic trends, we’ve got you covered. Join us as we unveil a collection of popular phrases and expressions that can help you convey the concept of mitigation in a fresh and engaging way. Let’s dive in and explore the colorful world of slang for “mitigate” together!

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1. Ease up

When someone is told to “ease up,” it means they should calm down or take it easy. It can also mean to reduce the intensity or severity of a situation.

  • For example, if someone is being too aggressive in an argument, someone might say, “Hey, ease up, we’re just discussing.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might tell an employee, “You need to ease up on your workload, you’re burning yourself out.”
  • If someone is being too strict or demanding, a friend might say, “You need to ease up on your rules, let people have some freedom.”

2. Tone down

To “tone down” means to reduce the intensity, severity, or impact of something. It can refer to making something less extreme or less noticeable.

  • For instance, if someone is being too loud, you might ask them to “tone it down.”
  • In a political debate, one might say, “Let’s tone down the rhetoric and have a civil discussion.”
  • If a movie has too much violence, a reviewer might suggest, “The director should have toned down the graphic scenes.”

3. Take the edge off

When someone “takes the edge off,” they are doing something to lessen the intensity or impact of a situation or feeling. It is often used to describe actions that provide temporary relief or relaxation.

  • For example, if someone is feeling stressed, they might say, “I need a glass of wine to take the edge off.”
  • If a person is feeling anxious before a presentation, they might take deep breaths to “take the edge off.”
  • After a long day at work, someone might watch a funny video to “take the edge off” and relax.

4. Soften the blow

To “soften the blow” means to make something less harsh, severe, or unpleasant. It is often used when delivering bad news or preparing someone for a difficult situation.

  • For instance, if someone is about to receive criticism, they might start by saying, “I want to soften the blow, but there are some areas you need to improve.”
  • If someone is getting laid off, their employer might offer a severance package to “soften the blow.”
  • When giving feedback, a teacher might say, “I’ll try to soften the blow, but your essay needs significant revisions.”

5. Water down

To “water down” means to dilute or weaken something, often to make it less strong, intense, or effective. It can refer to diluting a liquid or making something less potent.

  • For example, if a bartender makes a cocktail with less alcohol, they might be accused of “watering it down.”
  • In a political context, if a bill is significantly changed to gain more support, critics might argue that it has been “watered down.”
  • If someone tells a story but leaves out important details, they might say, “Sorry, I watered it down to make it shorter.”

6. Scale back

To decrease or lessen the intensity, size, or scope of something. “Scale back” is often used to describe the act of cutting back or trimming down.

  • For example, a company might scale back its operations during a slow season.
  • In a discussion about budget cuts, someone might suggest, “We need to scale back our expenses in order to save money.”
  • A person discussing their workload might say, “I need to scale back on my commitments to avoid burnout.”

7. Dampen

To make something less strong, intense, or vibrant. “Dampen” is often used to describe the act of reducing the impact or effect of something.

  • For instance, bad weather might dampen the mood of a outdoor event.
  • In a conversation about enthusiasm, someone might say, “Don’t let negative comments dampen your spirit.”
  • A person discussing economic growth might note, “The recent recession dampened consumer spending.”

8. Subdue

To bring under control or conquer. “Subdue” is often used to describe the act of overpowering or taming something.

  • For example, a police officer might subdue a suspect during an arrest.
  • In a discussion about personal fears, someone might say, “I try to subdue my anxiety by practicing deep breathing.”
  • A person discussing a conflict might suggest, “We need to find a peaceful solution to subdue the tension.”

9. Alleviate

To lessen or ease the intensity, severity, or burden of something. “Alleviate” is often used to describe the act of making a problem or situation more manageable.

  • For instance, taking pain medication can alleviate physical discomfort.
  • In a conversation about stress, someone might suggest, “Try deep relaxation techniques to alleviate tension.”
  • A person discussing poverty might argue, “Investing in education can alleviate the cycle of poverty.”

10. Quell

To put an end to or bring to a halt. “Quell” is often used to describe the act of calming or pacifying a situation.

  • For example, a strong leader can quell a rebellion.
  • In a discussion about riots, someone might say, “The police used tear gas to quell the protests.”
  • A person discussing their own emotions might admit, “I need to find a way to quell my anger before I react.”

11. Diminish

To make something smaller, weaker, or less important. “Diminish” is often used to describe the process of reducing the intensity or impact of something.

  • For example, a coach might say, “We need to diminish the opposing team’s scoring opportunities.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might argue, “We must take action to diminish our carbon footprint.”
  • A person reflecting on a difficult experience might say, “Time has helped diminish the pain and sadness.”

12. Minimize

To make something as small or as little as possible. “Minimize” is often used to describe the act of decreasing the size, extent, or importance of something.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “Please minimize distractions during the exam.”
  • In a conversation about risk management, someone might advise, “We need to minimize the potential for errors.”
  • A person discussing conflict resolution might suggest, “Let’s try to minimize the impact of our differences and focus on finding common ground.”

13. Temper

To moderate or soften the intensity or severity of something. “Temper” is often used to describe the act of adjusting or controlling something to make it more balanced or manageable.

  • For example, a chef might say, “Add some cream to temper the spiciness of the dish.”
  • In a discussion about emotions, someone might say, “I need to temper my anger before addressing the situation.”
  • A person giving advice on communication might suggest, “Try to temper your criticism with some positive feedback.”

14. Mitigate

To reduce the severity, seriousness, or impact of something. “Mitigate” is often used to describe the act of lessening the negative effects or consequences of a situation.

  • For instance, a government might implement policies to mitigate the effects of climate change.
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, someone might recommend, “Use strong passwords to mitigate the risk of hacking.”
  • A person discussing workplace stress might suggest, “Taking regular breaks can help mitigate the negative effects of long hours.”

15. Quench

To satisfy a need or desire fully. “Quench” is often used metaphorically to describe the act of satisfying or relieving something.

  • For example, a cold drink can quench your thirst on a hot day.
  • In a discussion about curiosity, someone might say, “Reading books can quench your thirst for knowledge.”
  • A person describing a satisfying meal might say, “The flavors of the dish really quenched my appetite.”

16. Tame

To make something less intense or severe. “Tame” is often used to describe the act of reducing the impact or effect of something negative.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need to tame my anger before I say something I regret.”
  • In a discussion about managing stress, someone might suggest, “Try some deep breathing exercises to tame your anxiety.”
  • A coach might advise their team, “We need to tame our opponents’ offense by staying focused and playing strong defense.”

17. Palliate

To alleviate or ease the symptoms or effects of something. “Palliate” often refers to providing temporary relief or making something less severe.

  • For instance, a doctor might prescribe medication to palliate a patient’s pain.
  • In a conversation about managing a difficult situation, someone might suggest, “Let’s try to palliate the tension by finding a compromise.”
  • A person experiencing a headache might say, “I took some painkillers to palliate the pain temporarily.”

18. Assuage

To alleviate or make something less intense or severe. “Assuage” often refers to providing comfort or relief.

  • For example, a person might say, “Listening to music helps assuage my stress.”
  • In a discussion about addressing concerns, someone might suggest, “Let’s assuage their fears by providing more information.”
  • A parent might try to assuage their child’s worries by saying, “Don’t worry, everything will be okay.”

19. Relieve

To lessen or alleviate something, often by providing assistance or support. “Relieve” is commonly used to describe the act of reducing or removing a burden or discomfort.

  • For instance, a massage can relieve muscle tension.
  • In a conversation about work stress, someone might say, “Taking breaks throughout the day can help relieve pressure.”
  • A person experiencing financial difficulties might seek relief by asking for assistance or finding a solution.
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20. Allay

To calm or reduce something, often by addressing fears or doubts. “Allay” is frequently used to describe the act of soothing or calming someone’s concerns.

  • For example, a person might say, “I tried to allay their worries by explaining the situation.”
  • In a discussion about a potential threat, someone might suggest, “We need to take action to allay public fears.”
  • A teacher might allay a student’s anxiety about an upcoming test by providing additional resources and support.

21. Pacify

To pacify means to calm or soothe someone or something that is agitated or upset. It is often used to describe actions taken to restore peace or reduce tension.

  • For example, a parent might pacify a crying baby by rocking them gently.
  • In a conflict, a mediator might attempt to pacify both parties by finding a compromise.
  • A person might try to pacify their own anxiety by practicing deep breathing exercises.

22. Soothe

To soothe means to provide comfort or relief to someone or something that is experiencing distress or discomfort. It is often used to describe actions or remedies that alleviate pain or calm emotions.

  • For instance, a person might soothe a sunburn by applying aloe vera gel.
  • A friend might soothe another friend’s sadness by offering a listening ear and words of encouragement.
  • A calming song or a warm bath can help soothe stress and anxiety.

23. Deaden

To deaden means to make something less sensitive or intense, often by reducing its ability to feel or perceive. It is often used to describe actions taken to lessen the impact or intensity of something.

  • For example, a dentist might use a local anesthetic to deaden the sensation of pain during a dental procedure.
  • A person might use earplugs to deaden the sound of loud music at a concert.
  • In a metaphorical sense, a person might deaden their emotions as a coping mechanism.
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24. Mollify

To mollify means to appease or calm someone’s anger or anxiety by addressing their concerns or making concessions. It is often used to describe actions taken to reduce hostility or tension.

  • For instance, a manager might mollify an upset employee by listening to their grievances and offering a solution.
  • A person might mollify their partner’s jealousy by reassuring them of their love and loyalty.
  • A government might implement policies to mollify public outcry over an issue.

25. Dilute

To dilute means to make something weaker or less concentrated by adding another substance, usually a liquid. It is often used to describe actions taken to reduce the potency or impact of something.

  • For example, a person might dilute a strong alcoholic drink by adding water or soda.
  • A company might dilute a product’s formula to reduce production costs.
  • In a metaphorical sense, a person might dilute the impact of criticism by focusing on positive feedback.

26. Lessen

To make something smaller or decrease its intensity.

  • For example, “We need to lessen our expenses in order to save money.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s lessen the amount of sugar in this recipe to make it healthier.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might suggest, “We need to lessen our carbon emissions to combat global warming.”

27. Ease

To make something less severe or intense.

  • For instance, “Taking a hot bath can ease muscle pain.”
  • A person might say, “Listening to music can ease stress and anxiety.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, someone might suggest, “Let’s brainstorm ideas to ease the tension.”

28. Ameliorate

To make something better or enhance its quality.

  • For example, “The new policies aim to ameliorate the working conditions for employees.”
  • A person might say, “Regular exercise can ameliorate your overall health.”
  • In a discussion about poverty, someone might propose, “We need to ameliorate access to education and job opportunities.”

29. Abate

To reduce or become less intense.

  • For instance, “The storm will abate by tomorrow morning.”
  • A person might say, “Taking medication can help abate the symptoms of a cold.”
  • In a conversation about noise pollution, someone might suggest, “Planting trees can help abate the sound coming from the road.”

30. Subside

To become less intense or severe.

  • For example, “After a few days, the pain in my knee subsided.”
  • A person might say, “Once the storm subsides, we can go outside.”
  • In a discussion about emotions, someone might explain, “It’s important to let anger subside before addressing a conflict.”

31. De-escalate

To reduce or lessen the intensity or severity of a situation, especially one that is potentially dangerous or hostile. “De-escalate” is often used in the context of conflict resolution or managing tense situations.

  • For example, a police officer might try to de-escalate a confrontation by using calm and non-confrontational language.
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “Let’s try to de-escalate the situation before it gets worse.”
  • A teacher might use de-escalation techniques to calm down an agitated student and prevent a disruptive outburst.
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32. Counteract

To take action to prevent or reduce the negative effects or consequences of something. “Counteract” implies actively working against or opposing the harmful or unwanted effects of a situation.

  • For instance, someone might take over-the-counter medication to counteract the symptoms of a cold or flu.
  • In a discussion about climate change, a scientist might propose strategies to counteract the effects of global warming.
  • A person trying to lose weight might counteract the calories consumed by increasing their physical activity level.