Top 43 Slang For Modified – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to staying on top of the latest trends, knowing the slang for modified is essential. Whether you’re into cars, fashion, or even social media, understanding these terms can help you navigate conversations with ease. Our team has put together a list of the coolest and most up-to-date slang for all things modified. Get ready to level up your lingo game and impress your friends with your newfound knowledge!

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1. Modded

This term refers to something that has been altered or customized from its original form. In the context of cars, “modded” typically means that a vehicle has been modified with aftermarket parts or modifications to enhance performance or aesthetics.

  • For example, a car enthusiast might say, “I just got my car modded with a new exhaust system.”
  • In a discussion about video games, a player might comment, “I love playing with modded weapons and armor.”
  • Someone might ask, “Where can I find modded cars for sale?”

2. Tuned

To “tune” something means to adjust or optimize it for better performance. In the context of cars, “tuned” typically refers to modifications made to the engine or other components to improve power, speed, or handling.

  • For instance, a car enthusiast might say, “I had my car tuned and it’s so much faster now.”
  • In a conversation about music, someone might say, “I love how they tuned the instruments for that song.”
  • A person might ask, “Where can I find a good tuner for my car?”

3. Customized

When something is “customized,” it means that it has been altered or tailored to suit individual preferences or specifications. In the context of modifications, “customized” typically refers to unique or one-of-a-kind modifications made to a vehicle.

  • For example, a car owner might say, “I had my car customized with a custom paint job and interior.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might comment, “I love how she customized her jacket with patches and embroidery.”
  • A person might ask, “Where can I find a shop that does customized modifications?”

4. Trick out

This slang term means to modify or enhance something, often in an extravagant or eye-catching manner. In the context of modifications, “trick out” typically refers to adding flashy or attention-grabbing features to a vehicle.

  • For instance, a car enthusiast might say, “I’m going to trick out my car with neon lights and a custom sound system.”
  • In a conversation about computers, someone might say, “I just tricked out my gaming rig with RGB lighting and liquid cooling.”
  • A person might ask, “What are some ways to trick out my motorcycle?”

5. Souped-up

This term means to modify or enhance something, often in a way that increases its power, speed, or performance. In the context of modifications, “souped-up” typically refers to making significant upgrades or modifications to a vehicle’s engine or other components.

  • For example, a car enthusiast might say, “I just got my car souped-up with a turbocharger and performance exhaust.”
  • In a discussion about motorcycles, someone might comment, “That souped-up bike can really fly.”
  • A person might ask, “How can I make my car more souped-up?”

6. Hot-rodded

This term originated in the 1930s and refers to modifying a car, typically for increased speed and power. “Hot-rodded” is often used to describe a vehicle that has been extensively modified for high performance.

  • For example, “He’s got a hot-rodded muscle car that can go from 0 to 60 in under 4 seconds.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “I spent months hot-rodding my classic car to make it faster and more powerful.”
  • Someone might comment on a modified car, “That hot-rodded engine sounds amazing!”

7. Decked out

This phrase is used to describe a vehicle that has been extensively customized or modified with various enhancements and upgrades. “Decked out” implies that the vehicle has been fully outfitted with additional features or accessories.

  • For instance, “His car is decked out with custom paint, a body kit, and aftermarket wheels.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “I’m planning to deck out my ride with a new sound system, LED lights, and performance upgrades.”
  • Someone might admire a decked out car and comment, “That vehicle is seriously decked out!”

8. Pimped out

This slang term is used to describe a vehicle that has been excessively customized or modified with flashy and extravagant features. “Pimped out” often implies that the modifications are done for show or to enhance the vehicle’s appearance.

  • For example, “He drives a pimped out car with gold-plated rims, a velvet interior, and a booming sound system.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “I’m going to pimp out my ride with neon lights, a custom paint job, and a hydraulic suspension.”
  • Someone might comment on a pimped out car and say, “That vehicle is definitely pimped out!”

9. Hopped-up

This term is used to describe a vehicle that has been modified or enhanced for increased power or performance. “Hopped-up” often refers to modifications made to the engine or other mechanical components to improve acceleration and speed.

  • For instance, “He’s got a hopped-up motorcycle that can reach top speeds of over 150 mph.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “I’m planning to get my car hopped-up with a turbocharger, upgraded exhaust system, and performance tuning.”
  • Someone might comment on a hopped-up vehicle and say, “That car sounds like a beast with its hopped-up engine!”

10. Swagged out

This term refers to a vehicle that has been modified in a way that makes it look stylish and cool. It often involves adding unique features or making aesthetic changes to the vehicle’s exterior or interior.

  • For example, “Check out that swagged out car with the custom paint job and flashy rims!”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “I love how he swagged out his ride with those LED lights.”
  • Someone might comment, “Her car is so swagged out, it’s like a rolling work of art.”

11. Beefed up

When a vehicle is “beefed up,” it means that it has been modified to increase its power, speed, or performance capabilities. This can involve adding aftermarket parts, upgrading the engine, or making other modifications to improve the vehicle’s overall performance.

  • For instance, “He beefed up his car by installing a turbocharger and upgrading the suspension.”
  • In a discussion about drag racing, someone might say, “To compete, you need a beefed up engine and lightweight modifications.”
  • A car enthusiast might comment, “That muscle car is seriously beefed up with all those performance enhancements.”

12. Slammed

When a vehicle is “slammed,” it means that it has been modified to have a very low ride height. This is often achieved by lowering the suspension or using specialized suspension components. The term is commonly used in the car customization community to describe a vehicle with an aggressive, low stance.

  • For example, “His car looks so cool slammed to the ground with those wide body fenders.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “I love the slammed look, but you have to be careful with speed bumps and driveways.”
  • Someone might comment, “That slammed truck looks mean and ready to take on any road.”

13. Lowered

When a vehicle is “lowered,” it means that the suspension has been modified to reduce the vehicle’s ride height. This can be done for aesthetic purposes or to improve handling and performance. Lowering a vehicle often involves replacing or modifying the suspension components to achieve the desired ride height.

  • For instance, “He lowered his car to improve cornering and give it a more aggressive look.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “Lowering your car can improve aerodynamics and reduce body roll.”
  • Someone might comment, “I prefer the lowered look because it gives the car a more sporty appearance.”

14. Bagged

When a vehicle is “bagged,” it means that it has been modified with an air suspension system. This allows the driver to adjust the ride height of the vehicle by inflating or deflating air bags or air springs. Bagged vehicles can be raised or lowered at the touch of a button, providing a customizable ride height and improved handling.

  • For example, “His bagged truck can raise up for off-road adventures and lower down for a sleek street look.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “Bagged cars offer a smooth and adjustable ride quality.”
  • Someone might comment, “Bagged vehicles are popular in the show car scene because they can achieve extreme low ride heights and still be drivable.”

15. Stanced

Refers to a car that has been modified to have a lowered suspension, usually for aesthetic purposes. The term “stanced” comes from the word “stance,” which refers to the overall look and positioning of a car.

  • For example, “His Honda Civic is stanced with a super low ride height.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “I love the aggressive stance of that stanced BMW.”
  • In a discussion about car modifications, someone might ask, “What’s your opinion on stanced cars?”

16. Chopped

Used to describe a car that has been modified by shortening its roof or removing a section of it. This modification is often done to give the car a more unique or aggressive look.

  • For instance, “He chopped the top off his classic Chevy for a custom look.”
  • In a conversation about car customization, someone might ask, “Have you ever considered chopping your car?”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “Chopped cars have a distinct and eye-catching appearance.”

17. Shaved

Refers to the act of removing or smoothing out certain exterior features of a car, such as door handles, emblems, or moldings. This modification is done to achieve a cleaner and more streamlined appearance.

  • For example, “He shaved the door handles on his car for a sleek look.”
  • In a discussion about car modifications, someone might ask, “Have you ever shaved any exterior features on your car?”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “Shaved cars have a minimalist and refined aesthetic.”

18. Riced

Used to describe a car that has been modified in a way that is considered excessive or gaudy. The term “riced” originated from the stereotype of Japanese import cars being modified with cheap and flashy aftermarket parts.

  • For instance, “That Honda Civic is completely riced out with a huge spoiler and neon lights.”
  • In a conversation about car customization, someone might say, “I prefer a more subtle look, I’m not into riced cars.”
  • A car enthusiast might criticize, “Riced cars often sacrifice performance for appearance.”

19. Sleeper

Refers to a car that appears to be unassuming or ordinary on the outside but has been modified to have high-performance capabilities. The term “sleeper” suggests that the car can “surprise” or “sneak up on” other drivers.

  • For example, “That unassuming station wagon is actually a sleeper with a powerful engine.”
  • In a discussion about car modifications, someone might ask, “Do you prefer sleeper builds or flashy show cars?”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “Sleeper cars are a great way to catch people off guard at the stoplight.”

20. JDM’d

This term refers to modifying a car with aftermarket parts and accessories that are commonly found in the Japanese domestic market. It often involves adding JDM-specific features or styling to a vehicle.

  • For example, “He JDM’d his Honda Civic by installing a JDM front bumper and JDM headlights.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “JDM’d cars have a unique style that sets them apart from other modified vehicles.”
  • Another might ask, “Where can I find JDM’d parts for my Subaru WRX?”

21. Euro’d

This slang term is used to describe the modification of a car to give it a European-inspired look or style. It often involves adding European aftermarket parts or accessories.

  • For instance, “He Euro’d his BMW by installing European-style wheels and a Euro-spec front grille.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “Euro’d cars have a sleek and sophisticated appearance.”
  • Another might ask, “What are some popular Euro’d mods for a Volkswagen GTI?”

22. Stroked

This term refers to modifying an engine by increasing its displacement. It involves replacing the stock crankshaft with one that has a longer stroke, resulting in a larger piston movement and increased engine displacement.

  • For example, “He stroked his small-block Chevy engine to increase its horsepower.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “Stroked engines deliver more torque and power.”
  • Another might ask, “What are the benefits of stroking an engine?”

23. Tricked

This slang term is used to describe a car that has been extensively modified or customized. It often refers to a vehicle that has undergone various modifications to enhance its performance, appearance, or both.

  • For instance, “He tricked out his Mustang with a custom paint job, aftermarket exhaust, and performance upgrades.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “Tricked cars are eye-catching and unique.”
  • Another might ask, “What are some popular tricks for modifying a car?”

24. Tweaked

This slang term is used to describe making small adjustments or modifications to a car’s performance or appearance. It often refers to fine-tuning or optimizing various aspects of a vehicle.

  • For example, “He tweaked the suspension on his sports car for better handling.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “Tweaked cars perform at their best.”
  • Another might ask, “What are some common tweaks for improving engine performance?”

25. Hotwired

To hotwire a car means to start it without using a key, typically by bypassing the ignition system. The term “hotwired” is often used to describe a stolen vehicle that has been started in this manner.

  • For example, “The thieves hotwired the car and made their getaway.”
  • In a discussion about car theft, someone might say, “Hotwiring a car is a classic method used by criminals.”
  • A person sharing a personal story might say, “I once accidentally hotwired my own car when I lost my keys.”

26. Flamed

To flame someone means to insult or criticize them harshly, usually in an online forum or discussion. The term “flamed” is often used to describe the act of attacking someone verbally.

  • For instance, “The user flamed the other person for their opinion.”
  • In a heated debate, someone might say, “Let’s keep the discussion civil and avoid flaming each other.”
  • A person sharing a negative online experience might say, “I posted a question and got flamed by other users for no reason.”

27. Dropped

To drop a car means to lower its suspension, typically for aesthetic purposes or to improve handling. The term “dropped” is often used to describe this modification.

  • For example, “He dropped his car and it looks much sleeker now.”
  • In a discussion about car modifications, someone might say, “Dropping a car can improve its cornering ability.”
  • A person sharing their own experience might say, “I recently dropped my car and it completely transformed the look.”

28. Whipped

To be whipped means to be completely infatuated or controlled by someone, often used in the context of a romantic relationship. The term “whipped” is often used to describe someone who is overly submissive or obedient to their partner.

  • For instance, “He’s so whipped, he can’t make any decisions without his girlfriend.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “Being whipped is not healthy for a balanced partnership.”
  • A person sharing a personal story might say, “I used to be whipped, but I’ve learned to prioritize my own needs.”

29. Boosted

To boost a car means to increase its power or performance, typically through modifications such as adding a turbocharger or supercharger. The term “boosted” is often used to describe a car that has been modified in this way.

  • For example, “He boosted his car’s engine and now it’s incredibly fast.”
  • In a discussion about car modifications, someone might say, “Boosting a car can significantly improve its acceleration.”
  • A person sharing their own experience might say, “I recently boosted my car and it’s a whole new level of fun to drive.”

30. NOS’d

This term refers to a car that has been modified with a Nitrous Oxide System, which is used to increase the power output of the engine. “NOS’d” is often used to describe a vehicle that has been enhanced with nitrous oxide for a boost in speed and performance.

  • For example, a car enthusiast might say, “Check out that NOS’d Mustang, it’s a beast on the drag strip.”
  • In a discussion about street racing, someone might ask, “Do you think he’s running NOS’d?”
  • A mechanic might recommend, “If you want to add some serious horsepower, consider getting your engine NOS’d.”

31. Hellaflush

This term describes a car with wheels that have an extremely low offset, meaning they are pushed outwards from the car’s body. “Hellaflush” is often used to describe a modified car that has a stance where the wheels are flush with the fenders, creating a visually appealing and aggressive look.

  • For instance, a car enthusiast might say, “That Hellaflush Civic looks amazing with those wide wheels.”
  • In a conversation about car modifications, someone might ask, “Have you seen any Hellaflush builds lately?”
  • A driver with a Hellaflush car might say, “I love the way my car looks, but it takes some skill to navigate speed bumps.”

32. Raked

This term refers to a car that has been modified with a front suspension that is lowered and a rear suspension that is raised. “Raked” is often used to describe a modified car that has a sloping appearance, with the front of the car lower than the rear.

  • For example, a car enthusiast might say, “That raked Camaro looks mean with its aggressive stance.”
  • In a discussion about car modifications, someone might ask, “Do you prefer a raked look or a leveled look?”
  • A driver with a raked car might say, “I love the way my car handles with the front lowered and the rear raised.”

33. Channeled

This term describes a car that has been modified by lowering the frame specifically around the drivetrain. “Channeled” is often used to describe a modified car that has a lower center of gravity, which can improve handling and performance.

  • For instance, a car enthusiast might say, “That channeled hot rod looks sleek and fast.”
  • In a conversation about car modifications, someone might ask, “Have you ever channeled a car before?”
  • A driver with a channeled car might say, “I can really feel the difference in cornering and stability after channeling my vehicle.”

34. Tubbed

This term refers to a car that has been modified with widened wheel wells, allowing for larger and wider tires to be installed. “Tubbed” is often used to describe a modified car that has a more aggressive and muscular appearance due to the wider stance.

  • For example, a car enthusiast might say, “That tubbed Chevelle looks mean with those massive rear tires.”
  • In a discussion about car modifications, someone might ask, “What’s the benefit of tubbing a car?”
  • A driver with a tubbed car might say, “I love the traction and grip I get with the wider tires on my tubbed Mustang.”

35. Upgraded

This term refers to making enhancements or improvements to a vehicle’s performance, features, or overall quality. It can involve replacing parts, adding new features, or upgrading existing components.

  • For example, “He upgraded his exhaust system to improve the sound and performance of his car.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “I’m planning to upgrade my suspension to enhance the handling.”
  • In a discussion about modifications, someone might ask, “What upgrades have you made to your vehicle?”

36. Restomod

A restomod is a vehicle that has been restored to its original condition but with modern upgrades and modifications. It combines the classic look of a vintage car with modern performance, technology, and comforts.

  • For instance, “He turned an old Mustang into a restomod by adding a new engine, suspension, and modern interior.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “Restomods are becoming increasingly popular among collectors who want the best of both worlds.”
  • In a discussion about classic cars, someone might ask, “What do you think of restomods?”

37. Rat-rodded

To rat-rod a vehicle means to customize it to have a worn, vintage appearance while still maintaining its functionality. It often involves modifying the body, suspension, and engine to create a unique and rough-looking vehicle.

  • For example, “He rat-rodded his truck by removing the fenders, painting it with a rusty patina, and adding oversized tires.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “Rat-rodding is all about embracing the imperfections and creating a one-of-a-kind vehicle.”
  • In a discussion about car customization, someone might ask, “Have you ever considered rat-rodding a vehicle?”

38. Mildly tuned

This term refers to making small or modest modifications to a vehicle’s performance, usually with the goal of improving its power, handling, or aesthetics. It typically involves minor changes to the engine, suspension, or appearance.

  • For instance, “He mildly tuned his car by adding a cold air intake and a performance exhaust.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “Mildly tuned vehicles strike a balance between performance and everyday drivability.”
  • In a discussion about modifications, someone might ask, “What are some common modifications for mildly tuned cars?”

39. Track-ready

This term describes a vehicle that has been modified and optimized for racing or track use. It often involves enhancements to the engine, suspension, brakes, and aerodynamics to improve performance and handling.

  • For example, “He made his car track-ready by installing racing seats, a roll cage, and high-performance tires.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “Track-ready vehicles are designed to perform at their best on a race track.”
  • In a discussion about racing, someone might ask, “What modifications are necessary to make a car track-ready?”

40. Performance-enhanced

This term refers to a vehicle that has been modified or upgraded to improve its performance. It often includes modifications to the engine, suspension, exhaust, or other components.

  • For example, “He added a turbocharger to his car to make it performance-enhanced.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “I love seeing performance-enhanced vehicles at car shows.”
  • In a discussion about racing, someone might mention, “Many professional racers drive performance-enhanced cars.”

41. Riced out

This slang term is used to describe a car that has been excessively modified with cosmetic enhancements, often in an attempt to make it look more impressive or sporty. It can include modifications such as large spoilers, flashy paint jobs, or oversized exhaust pipes.

  • For instance, “His car is completely riced out with neon lights and a huge wing.”
  • In a conversation about car aesthetics, someone might say, “I prefer a clean, understated look over a riced out appearance.”
  • A car enthusiast might comment, “Some people go overboard with riced out modifications.”

42. JDM

JDM refers to vehicles or vehicle parts that are specifically designed for the Japanese domestic market. It is often used to describe cars or car parts that are imported from Japan and have unique features or specifications.

  • For example, “He imported a JDM engine for his car to increase its performance.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “JDM parts are highly sought after for their quality and performance.”
  • In a discussion about car culture, someone might mention, “JDM cars have a dedicated following.”

43. Euro

This term is used to refer to European cars or car parts, often associated with luxury or performance vehicles from European manufacturers.

  • For instance, “He drives a Euro car with a powerful engine.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “I love the styling of Euro cars.”
  • In a conversation about car imports, someone might mention, “Euro car parts can be expensive but are often worth the investment.”
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