Top 71 Slang For More Than – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing quantities that exceed expectations, the English language has a plethora of slang terms to offer. Curious to learn the various ways to say “more than” in a cool and trendy manner? Look no further! Our team has compiled a list of the most popular and amusing slang expressions that will surely elevate your conversational game. Stay ahead of the curve and impress your friends with your newfound linguistic flair!

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1. Over

When something is “over” a certain value or amount, it means it exceeds or surpasses it. It can also indicate a higher level or degree.

  • For example, “The temperature is over 100 degrees today.”
  • In a game, a player might say, “I scored over 50 points in the last match.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I can’t believe it’s over already!”

2. Beyond

When something is “beyond” a certain point or limit, it means it extends or goes further than that point. It can also imply something that is outside of the expected or usual.

  • For instance, “His talent goes beyond what we expected.”
  • In a discussion about space exploration, someone might say, “The universe is vast, and we have so much more to discover beyond our own solar system.”
  • A person might describe a difficult situation as, “It’s beyond my control.”

3. Above

When something is “above” a certain level or position, it means it is at a higher point or rank. It can also indicate a superiority or excellence.

  • For example, “She scored above the class average on the test.”
  • In a conversation about promotions, someone might say, “I want to move above my current position.”
  • A person might praise someone’s work by saying, “Your performance is above and beyond expectations.”

4. Surpass

When something “surpasses” a certain standard or expectation, it means it exceeds or outdoes it. It can also imply going beyond what is considered normal or typical.

  • For instance, “Her skills in singing surpass those of her competitors.”
  • In a discussion about achievements, someone might say, “He has surpassed all previous records in his sport.”
  • A person might encourage others by saying, “Don’t settle for mediocrity; strive to surpass your own limits.”

5. Exceed

When something “exceeds” a certain limit or boundary, it means it goes beyond or surpasses it. It can also indicate a greater amount or degree.

  • For example, “The cost of the project exceeded our budget.”
  • In a conversation about speed limits, someone might say, “You were exceeding the speed limit.”
  • A person might express surprise by saying, “The turnout for the event exceeded our expectations.”

6. Outstrip

To exceed or go beyond in performance, quality, or achievement. “Outstrip” is often used to describe someone or something that is better or more successful than others.

  • For example, a runner might say, “I hope to outstrip my previous time in the marathon.”
  • In a business context, one might say, “Our company aims to outstrip the competition in sales.”
  • A student might boast, “I always strive to outstrip my classmates in academic performance.”

7. Outdo

To surpass or excel in a particular activity or achievement. “Outdo” is often used to describe someone who does better than others in a specific task or competition.

  • For instance, a chef might say, “I want to outdo myself with this new recipe.”
  • In a sports context, one might say, “The team is determined to outdo their rivals in the upcoming match.”
  • A student might challenge their classmates, saying, “I’ll outdo all of you on the next exam.”

8. Eclipse

To surpass or overshadow in importance, fame, or influence. “Eclipse” is often used to describe someone or something that becomes more significant or prominent than others, making them seem less important.

  • For example, a new movie might “eclipse” the box office records of previous films.
  • In a political context, one might say, “The scandal has eclipsed all other news stories.”
  • A talented musician might “eclipse” their peers with their extraordinary talent.

9. Outshine

To surpass in excellence, brilliance, or beauty. “Outshine” is often used to describe someone or something that stands out and is superior to others in a particular aspect.

  • For instance, a star athlete might “outshine” their teammates with their exceptional skills.
  • In a fashion context, one might say, “Her stunning dress outshined all the others at the event.”
  • A talented performer might “outshine” their fellow actors with their captivating stage presence.

10. Trump

To surpass or exceed in significance, importance, or quality. “Trump” is often used to describe someone or something that is better or more powerful than others.

  • For example, a student might say, “I hope my presentation will trump all the others in the class.”
  • In a business context, one might say, “Our company’s innovative product will trump the competition.”
  • A politician might claim, “My policy proposals will trump those of my opponents.”

11. Beat

To beat someone means to defeat them or surpass them in a competition or activity. It can also mean to excel or outperform someone.

  • For example, “I beat my opponent in the race and won first place.”
  • In a game of chess, one player might say, “I beat my opponent in just 10 moves.”
  • A student might say, “I studied hard and beat the curve on the test.”

12. Top

To top something means to exceed or surpass it in quality, performance, or achievement.

  • For instance, “The new movie topped the box office charts.”
  • A chef might say, “I topped the dish with a sprinkle of fresh herbs.”
  • A student might say, “I topped the class with my high GPA.”

13. Outmatch

To outmatch someone means to surpass or outperform them, often in a competitive context.

  • For example, “Our team outmatched the opponents and won the game.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might say, “I believe my skills and experience outmatch those of other applicants.”
  • A salesperson might say, “Our product’s features and benefits outmatch the competition.”

14. Outclass

To outclass someone means to surpass or excel them in a particular area, often in terms of skill, talent, or style.

  • For instance, “The seasoned musician outclassed the other performers with his virtuosity.”
  • A fashion critic might say, “Her outfit outclasses the rest of the attendees.”
  • A teacher might say, “The student’s essay outclassed the other submissions in terms of depth and analysis.”

15. Outperform

To outperform someone means to excel or surpass them in terms of performance, achievement, or results.

  • For example, “Our company’s stock consistently outperforms the market.”
  • A athlete might say, “I trained hard and outperformed my personal best.”
  • A musician might say, “The band’s latest album outperformed their previous releases in terms of sales and critical acclaim.”

16. Outpace

To go faster or achieve more than someone or something else. “Outpace” implies that you are moving at a quicker rate or making more progress compared to others.

  • For example, in a race, one runner might “outpace” their competitors and finish first.
  • In a business context, a company might strive to “outpace” its competitors by increasing sales and market share.
  • A news headline might read, “Tech industry continues to outpace other sectors in job growth.”

17. Outrun

To run faster or perform better than someone or something else. “Outrun” suggests that you are surpassing others in terms of speed or performance.

  • For instance, in a race, an athlete might “outrun” their opponents to win the gold medal.
  • In a game, a player might “outrun” their opponents to score a goal or make a touchdown.
  • A news report might state, “Usain Bolt outruns his competitors once again to claim victory.”

18. Outdistance

To create a greater distance or achieve better results than someone or something else. “Outdistance” implies that you are leaving others far behind or surpassing them in terms of distance or performance.

  • For example, in a marathon, a runner might “outdistance” their competitors and finish several minutes ahead.
  • In a sales competition, a salesperson might “outdistance” their colleagues by achieving significantly higher sales numbers.
  • A headline might read, “Company X outdistances competitors with record-breaking profits.”

19. Outweigh

To have a greater significance, importance, or value compared to someone or something else. “Outweigh” suggests that the positive aspects or benefits of one thing are greater than those of another.

  • For instance, when making a decision, the advantages of one option might “outweigh” the disadvantages.
  • In a debate, one argument might “outweigh” the opposing argument in terms of evidence and logic.
  • A news article might state, “The benefits of exercise outweigh the risks of injury and illness.”

20. Outnumber

To have a greater number or amount compared to someone or something else. “Outnumber” suggests that there are more of one thing than another.

  • For example, in a vote, one political party might “outnumber” the other and win the election.
  • In a classroom, female students might “outnumber” male students.
  • A news report might state, “Protesters outnumbered police officers at the demonstration.”

21. Outvalue

When you “outvalue” something or someone, you are considered to have a higher worth or value than them. This can refer to material possessions, personal qualities, or achievements.

  • For example, “She outvalued her competitors with her exceptional skills and experience.”
  • In a discussion about investments, someone might say, “This stock has the potential to outvalue all others in the market.”
  • A person might proudly declare, “I outvalue anyone in terms of loyalty and dedication.”

22. Outbid

When you “outbid” someone, you offer a higher price than them in an auction or competition. This term is commonly used in the context of bidding on items or services.

  • For instance, “He outbid all other participants and won the rare collectible.”
  • In a discussion about real estate, someone might say, “I had to outbid several other buyers to secure my dream house.”
  • A person might boast, “I can outbid anyone when it comes to buying antiques.”

23. Outrank

When you “outrank” someone, you hold a higher rank or position than them. This term is often used in the context of military, organizational, or social hierarchies.

  • For example, “The general outranks all other officers in the army.”
  • In a discussion about job promotions, someone might say, “She was able to outrank her colleagues and become the team leader.”
  • A person might assert, “I outrank you in terms of experience and expertise.”

24. Outsmart

When you “outsmart” someone, you defeat or surpass them by using cleverness or intelligence. This can refer to outwitting someone in a game, outmaneuvering them in a competition, or simply being more intellectually astute.

  • For instance, “He outsmarted his opponents with his strategic thinking.”
  • In a discussion about solving puzzles, someone might say, “I can outsmart anyone when it comes to riddles.”
  • A person might brag, “I always outsmart my opponents in chess.”

25. Outmaneuver

When you “outmaneuver” someone, you surpass or defeat them by making strategic moves or taking calculated actions. This term is often used in the context of sports, games, or competitive situations.

  • For example, “The runner outmaneuvered his opponents and crossed the finish line first.”
  • In a discussion about business negotiations, someone might say, “We need to outmaneuver the competition and secure the best deal.”
  • A person might assert, “I can outmaneuver any player on the basketball court.”

26. Outplay

To perform better than someone or something in a specific activity or competition. “Outplay” implies a level of skill or strategy that allows someone to surpass their opponent or exceed expectations.

  • For example, in a sports context, one might say, “The quarterback outplayed the defense with his accurate passes.”
  • In a video game, a player might boast, “I outplayed my opponent with a well-timed combo.”
  • A musician might say, “I always strive to outplay myself with each new performance.”

27. Outtalk

To speak more or better than someone else, often in a persuasive or convincing manner. “Outtalk” suggests that someone is able to dominate a conversation or debate through their superior communication skills.

  • For instance, in a political debate, one candidate might try to outtalk their opponent by interrupting and speaking louder.
  • In a business negotiation, someone might aim to outtalk their counterpart by presenting a compelling argument.
  • A motivational speaker might encourage their audience to “outtalk the negative voices in their heads” and focus on positive affirmations.
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28. Outlast

To survive or endure longer than someone or something. “Outlast” implies a sense of resilience and the ability to withstand challenges or difficult circumstances.

  • For example, in a reality TV show competition, a contestant might strive to outlast their opponents by staying in the game until the end.
  • In a marathon, a runner might say, “I’m determined to outlast my fatigue and cross the finish line.”
  • A business owner might aim to outlast their competitors by adapting to changing market conditions and staying relevant.

29. Outwit

To defeat or surpass someone through cleverness, intelligence, or cunning. “Outwit” suggests that someone is able to outmaneuver their opponent by using their wit or superior mental abilities.

  • For instance, in a game of chess, a player might outwit their opponent by anticipating their moves and planning several steps ahead.
  • In a prank war, someone might try to outwit their friend by coming up with unexpected and creative pranks.
  • A detective in a crime novel might outwit the criminal by solving the mystery and uncovering their hidden motives.

30. Outflank

To gain an advantage over someone by moving around them or attacking from a different angle. “Outflank” implies a strategic positioning that allows someone to gain the upper hand or catch their opponent off guard.

  • For example, in a military context, a commander might outflank the enemy by sending troops to attack from the side or rear.
  • In a business negotiation, someone might outflank their counterpart by presenting a new proposal or offering unexpected incentives.
  • A soccer player might outflank the opposing team’s defense by dribbling the ball along the sideline and creating scoring opportunities.

31. Outscore

To outscore someone means to score more points or achieve a higher performance than them. This term is often used in sports or competitive activities.

  • For example, “The home team managed to outscore their opponents in the final minutes of the game.”
  • In a discussion about a basketball match, someone might say, “LeBron James consistently outscores his opponents.”
  • A sports commentator might mention, “The team’s ability to outscore their opponents has been key to their success this season.”

32. Outgun

To outgun someone means to have superior firepower or weaponry compared to them. This term is often used in military or combat contexts.

  • For instance, “The enemy forces were outgunned and quickly surrendered.”
  • In a discussion about a historical battle, someone might say, “The British navy was outgunned by the Spanish Armada.”
  • A military strategist might advise, “In order to win this war, we need to outgun the enemy.”

33. Outgrow

To outgrow something means to become too big or mature beyond its limitations. This term is often used in the context of physical growth or personal development.

  • For example, “Children quickly outgrow their clothes as they grow taller.”
  • In a discussion about personal goals, someone might say, “I feel like I’ve outgrown this job and need to find new challenges.”
  • A parent might mention, “My daughter has outgrown her toys and now prefers more age-appropriate activities.”

34. Outspend

To outspend someone means to spend more money than them. This term is often used in the context of financial competition or excessive spending.

  • For instance, “The billionaire businessman is known to outspend his competitors in advertising.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might say, “We need to be careful not to outspend our income.”
  • A financial advisor might caution, “Don’t try to keep up with others’ spending habits if it means you’ll outspend your means.”

35. Outearn

To outearn someone means to earn more money than them. This term is often used in the context of income comparison or financial success.

  • For example, “The top salesperson consistently outearns their colleagues.”
  • In a discussion about career choices, someone might say, “I chose this profession because I wanted the potential to outearn my peers.”
  • An entrepreneur might boast, “My business has allowed me to outearn my previous salary.”

36. Outproduce

To produce more or better than someone or something else. It is often used in a competitive context.

  • For example, a manager might say, “Our team needs to outproduce our competitors to stay ahead in the market.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might motivate their players by saying, “Let’s outproduce the other team and show them what we’re capable of.”
  • A farmer might discuss their crops by saying, “This year, we’re aiming to outproduce our previous harvest.”

37. Outsource

To transfer a task or job to an external organization or individual, often to reduce costs or improve efficiency.

  • For instance, a company might outsource its customer service department to a call center in another country.
  • A small business owner might say, “I decided to outsource my accounting to a professional to save time and ensure accuracy.”
  • In a discussion about job opportunities, someone might mention, “Many companies outsource their IT services, creating opportunities for tech professionals.”

38. Outswim

To swim with greater speed or skill than another person.

  • For example, in a swimming competition, a coach might say, “You need to outswim your opponents to win the race.”
  • A swimmer might challenge their friend by saying, “I bet I can outswim you in a 100-meter race.”
  • In a swimming lesson, an instructor might encourage their student by saying, “Keep practicing, and soon you’ll be able to outswim everyone in your class.”

39. Outclimb

To climb with greater height or skill than another person.

  • For instance, in a rock climbing competition, a climber might say, “I’m confident I can outclimb the other participants.”
  • A mountaineer might discuss their achievements by saying, “I’ve managed to outclimb some of the most challenging peaks in the world.”
  • In a hiking group, someone might challenge their fellow hikers by saying, “Let’s see who can outclimb the others to the summit.”

40. Outfly

To fly with greater speed or skill than another person or aircraft.

  • For example, in a race between two pilots, one might say, “I’ll outfly you and reach the finish line first.”
  • A bird enthusiast might observe, “The falcon can outfly most other birds due to its incredible speed.”
  • In a discussion about aviation, someone might mention, “The new fighter jet has the ability to outfly any previous models.”

41. Outdrive

To outdrive someone means to perform better in driving, usually in a competitive setting. It can refer to driving a vehicle faster, farther, or with more skill than another person.

  • For example, in a racing competition, one driver might say, “I’m going to outdrive my opponents and take the lead.”
  • In a friendly competition among friends, someone might boast, “I can outdrive anyone on this course.”
  • A driving instructor might encourage a student by saying, “You’re improving, but I still think you can outdrive your previous best.”

42. Outdance

To outdance someone means to perform better in dancing, usually in a competitive setting. It can refer to dancing with more skill, grace, or energy than another person.

  • For instance, in a dance competition, a judge might comment, “She really outdanced the other contestants with her impressive moves.”
  • In a dance-off between friends, someone might challenge another person by saying, “I bet I can outdance you on the dance floor.”
  • A dance instructor might encourage a student by saying, “Keep practicing and you’ll be able to outdance anyone.”

43. Outsing

To outsing someone means to perform better in singing, usually in a competitive setting. It can refer to singing with better vocal range, technique, or expression than another person.

  • For example, in a singing competition, a judge might say, “She really outsang the other contestants with her powerful voice.”
  • In a karaoke session with friends, someone might challenge another person by saying, “I can outsing you on any song.”
  • A vocal coach might encourage a student by saying, “With practice, you’ll be able to outsing your previous performances.”

44. Surpassing

When something is surpassing, it means it exceeds expectations or standards. It can refer to something that is exceptionally good, impressive, or outstanding.

  • For instance, a movie critic might write, “The film’s visual effects are surpassing, creating a truly immersive experience.”
  • In a discussion about a sports performance, someone might say, “His performance was surpassing, breaking multiple records in a single game.”
  • A teacher might write on a student’s report card, “Your dedication and hard work have resulted in surpassing grades this semester.”

45. Exceeding

When something is exceeding, it means it goes beyond a certain limit or boundary. It can refer to something that is more than what is expected, required, or allowed.

  • For example, a speed limit sign might read, “Exceeding the speed limit is punishable by law.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “Our sales are exceeding expectations this quarter.”
  • A fitness trainer might encourage their client by saying, “Keep pushing yourself, and you’ll see exceeding results in no time.”

46. Outweighing

When something outweighs something else, it means that it is considered to be more important or significant.

  • For example, in a debate, one might argue, “The benefits of this policy outweigh the potential risks.”
  • In a discussion about career choices, someone might say, “The satisfaction of doing meaningful work outweighs the higher salary.”
  • A person reflecting on a decision might think, “The advantages of moving to a new city outweigh the challenges.”

47. Outstretching

Outstretching refers to the act of extending or stretching something beyond a certain point.

  • For instance, a person might say, “His generosity is outstretching his financial resources.”
  • In a yoga class, the instructor might encourage students to “outstretch their arms and reach for the sky.”
  • A person describing a beautiful landscape might say, “The mountains outstretch as far as the eye can see.”

48. Outreaching

Outreaching refers to the act of exceeding a certain limit or boundary.

  • For example, a company might set a goal to “outreach their sales targets for the quarter.”
  • In a fundraising campaign, an organization might aim to “outreach their donation goal.”
  • A person describing their personal growth might say, “I am constantly outreaching my own expectations.”

49. Outdistancing

Outdistancing means to move ahead or progress faster than others.

  • For instance, in a race, one runner might outdistance the others and finish first.
  • In a competition, a team might outdistance their opponents and win the game.
  • A person describing their career advancement might say, “I am outdistancing my colleagues and moving up the corporate ladder.”

50. Outgrowing

Outgrowing refers to the process of becoming too big or mature for something.

  • For example, a child might outgrow their clothes and need new ones.
  • In a friendship, two people might outgrow each other and drift apart.
  • A person reflecting on their past might say, “I have outgrown my old habits and embraced a healthier lifestyle.”

51. Outlasting

This term refers to the act of enduring or continuing to exist for a longer period of time than anticipated or predicted.

  • For example, “She outlasted all of her competitors in the marathon.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “They have been married for 50 years, truly outlasting all odds.”
  • A person talking about a difficult situation might comment, “I will outlast this challenge and come out stronger on the other side.”

52. Outliving

This term is used to describe the act of surpassing the expected lifespan or duration of something or someone.

  • For instance, “She outlived all of her siblings and lived to be 100 years old.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might say, “This old computer has outlived its usefulness.”
  • A person discussing the longevity of a product might comment, “This brand of car has a reputation for outliving its competitors.”

53. Outmaneuvering

This term refers to the act of using superior tactics or strategy to gain an advantage over an opponent or competitor.

  • For example, “He outmaneuvered his opponent on the chessboard and checkmated him in just a few moves.”
  • In a conversation about business, someone might say, “Our company has successfully outmaneuvered our competitors in the market.”
  • A person talking about a difficult negotiation might comment, “I managed to outmaneuver the other party and secure a better deal for myself.”

54. Outwitting

This term is used to describe the act of using cleverness or intelligence to deceive or outsmart someone.

  • For instance, “The detective outwitted the criminal and solved the case.”
  • In a discussion about pranks, someone might say, “He constantly outwits his friends with elaborate practical jokes.”
  • A person talking about a challenging puzzle might comment, “It took me a while, but I finally outwitted the riddle and solved it.”

55. Outplaying

This term refers to the act of outperforming or surpassing someone in a game, sport, or competitive activity.

  • For example, “The team outplayed their opponents and won the championship.”
  • In a conversation about video games, someone might say, “He is known for his exceptional skills and ability to outplay his opponents.”
  • A person discussing a sports match might comment, “The star player outplayed the entire opposing team and scored multiple goals.”

56. Outearning

This term refers to the act of earning a higher income or making more money than someone else. It is often used to highlight a person’s financial success or superiority.

  • For example, “He has been outearning his colleagues for years.”
  • A discussion about salary disparities might involve someone saying, “Women are still struggling with outearning their male counterparts.”
  • In a conversation about professional achievements, someone might boast, “I have been consistently outearning my competitors in the industry.”

57. Outspending

This term refers to the act of spending a larger amount of money compared to someone else. It is often used to emphasize a person’s extravagant or excessive spending habits.

  • For instance, “She has a reputation for outspending her friends on luxurious vacations.”
  • In a conversation about shopping habits, someone might say, “I always end up outspending my budget on Black Friday.”
  • A person discussing financial responsibility might advise, “Avoid outspending your means and save for the future.”

58. Outinvesting

This term refers to the act of investing a larger amount of money compared to someone else. It is often used to indicate a person’s commitment or dedication to financial investments.

  • For example, “He has been outinvesting his peers in the stock market.”
  • In a discussion about retirement planning, someone might say, “Outinvesting early on can lead to significant financial growth.”
  • A financial advisor might suggest, “Consider outinvesting in diverse portfolios to maximize returns.”

59. Outbidding

This term refers to the act of placing a higher bid than someone else in an auction or competitive bidding situation. It is often used to highlight a person’s determination or willingness to pay a higher price.

  • For instance, “She outbid all other participants and won the rare artwork.”
  • In a conversation about real estate, someone might say, “The buyer outbid everyone else and secured the property.”
  • A person discussing auction strategies might advise, “Outbidding at the last moment can surprise other bidders and secure the item.”

60. Outbaking

This term refers to the act of baking a larger quantity or variety of baked goods compared to someone else. It is often used to showcase a person’s culinary skills or dedication to baking.

  • For example, “She outbakes her friends by preparing a wide range of desserts.”
  • In a discussion about baking competitions, someone might say, “She consistently outbakes her competitors and wins the top prize.”
  • A person sharing baking tips might suggest, “To outbake others, focus on perfecting your techniques and experimenting with unique flavors.”

61. Outcooking

When someone outcooks another person, it means they are able to prepare food in a superior or more skillful way. This term is often used in friendly competitions or to compliment someone’s cooking abilities.

  • For example, if someone makes a delicious meal, another person might say, “Wow, you really outcooked me!”
  • In a cooking show, a judge might comment, “The contestant really outcooked the competition with their flavors and presentation.”
  • A chef might boast, “I can outcook anyone in this kitchen!”

62. Outdancing

When someone outdances another person, it means they are able to perform dance moves with more skill or style. This term is commonly used in dance competitions or to acknowledge someone’s superior dancing abilities.

  • For instance, if someone impresses with their dance moves, another person might say, “You totally outdanced everyone on the dance floor!”
  • In a talent show, a judge might comment, “The contestant really outdanced the others with their precision and energy.”
  • A dancer might confidently state, “I can outdance anyone in this room!”

63. Outdressing

When someone outdresses another person, it means they are able to choose and wear clothes in a more fashionable or stylish way. This term is often used in fashion competitions or to acknowledge someone’s superior fashion sense.

  • For example, if someone receives compliments on their outfit, another person might say, “You definitely outdressed me today!”
  • In a fashion show, a commentator might remark, “The model really outdressed the others with their unique style and confidence.”
  • A fashionista might confidently declare, “I can outdress anyone in this city!”

64. Outfashioning

When someone outfashions another person, it means they are able to keep up with or set new trends in fashion. This term is often used to describe someone who consistently dresses in a stylish and fashionable way.

  • For instance, if someone receives compliments on their outfit, another person might say, “You’re always outfashioning everyone!”
  • In a fashion magazine, an article might praise a celebrity for their ability to outfashion others with their unique fashion choices.
  • A trendsetter might confidently state, “I can outfashion anyone in this industry!”

65. Outstyling

When someone outstyles another person, it means they have a more distinctive or impressive personal style. This term is often used to describe someone who consistently stands out with their fashion choices and overall appearance.

  • For example, if someone receives compliments on their outfit, another person might say, “You’re definitely outstyling everyone!”
  • In a fashion blog, an article might highlight a fashion influencer who consistently outstyles others with their unique and bold fashion sense.
  • A style icon might confidently declare, “I can outstyle anyone in this industry!”

66. Outstudying

This term refers to studying more or better than someone else, often with the intention of achieving better grades or academic success.

  • For example, a student might say, “I’ve been outstudying my classmates and it’s really paying off.”
  • In a competitive academic environment, a peer might comment, “She’s always outstudying everyone else in the class.”
  • A parent might encourage their child by saying, “Keep outstudying your classmates and you’ll get into a top college.”

67. Outlearning

This slang term means to acquire knowledge or learn at a faster or greater rate than someone else.

  • For instance, a student might boast, “I’ve been outlearning my friends in math and science.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “I’m always striving to outlearn myself.”
  • A teacher might commend a student by saying, “You’ve been outlearning your peers in this subject.”

68. Outteaching

This phrase describes the act of teaching in a superior or more effective manner compared to others.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I strive to outteach myself every year.”
  • In a conversation about educational methods, someone might comment, “He’s always outteaching his colleagues.”
  • A student might compliment a teacher by saying, “You really outteach other teachers in this subject.”

69. Outcoaching

This slang term refers to coaching or guiding others in a more skilled or successful way than others.

  • For instance, a sports fan might say, “Our coach always outcoaches the opposing team.”
  • In a discussion about leadership, someone might comment, “She’s known for outcoaching her competitors.”
  • A player might express gratitude by saying, “Thanks for outcoaching me and helping me improve my skills.”

70. Outmanaging

This term describes the act of managing or overseeing a situation or group of people in a more effective or successful manner than others.

  • For example, a supervisor might say, “I always strive to outmanage my team.”
  • In a discussion about leadership, someone might comment, “He’s known for outmanaging his colleagues.”
  • An employee might express appreciation by saying, “You really outmanage other managers in this company.”

71. Outleading

When something or someone surpasses or goes beyond what was anticipated or expected. This term is often used to describe a performance, achievement, or result that is better than what was initially predicted.

  • For example, “The team’s outleading performance secured their victory.”
  • A student might say, “I studied hard and got an outleading grade on the test.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “The company’s profits have been outleading projections for the past quarter.”