Top 26 Slang For Moreover – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing ideas and adding more information to a conversation, we often find ourselves using the word “moreover.” But why stick to the conventional when there are so many fun and creative alternatives out there? In this article, we’ve compiled a list of the top slang words for “moreover” that will not only spice up your conversations but also make you sound like a true language maven. Get ready to level up your vocabulary game and impress your friends with these trendy expressions!

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1. Furthermore

This word is used to add more information or emphasize a point that has already been made. It is often used in formal or academic writing.

  • For example, “Furthermore, the study found that exercise can improve mental health.”
  • In a business presentation, a speaker might say, “Furthermore, our new product line is projected to increase sales by 20%.”
  • A news article might state, “The senator criticized the new policy, stating that it is unfair. Furthermore, he called for a complete overhaul of the system.”

2. Additionally

This word is used to introduce an extra point or piece of information. It is similar in meaning to “furthermore” and is commonly used in both formal and informal writing.

  • For instance, “Additionally, the report highlights the need for increased funding.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might say, “I’ve been to Paris and London. Additionally, I’ve also visited Rome and Barcelona.”
  • An article about healthy eating might state, “In addition to consuming fruits and vegetables, it is important to also focus on whole grains and lean proteins.”

3. Plus

This word is used to indicate that something is in addition to what has already been mentioned. It is commonly used in casual conversations and informal writing.

  • For example, “I love chocolate ice cream. Plus, it has fewer calories than other flavors.”
  • In a discussion about benefits, someone might say, “Working for this company comes with great perks. Plus, they offer flexible working hours.”
  • A blog post about fashion might state, “This season’s trends include bold prints and bright colors. Plus, oversized accessories are making a comeback.”

4. Also

This word is used to add another point or piece of information to what has already been stated. It is a versatile word that can be used in both formal and informal contexts.

  • For instance, “I enjoy hiking. Also, I love camping in the mountains.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “The proposed policy will have negative consequences for the environment. Also, it will disproportionately affect low-income communities.”
  • An article about technology might state, “Smartphones have revolutionized communication. Also, they have changed the way we access information and entertainment.”

5. Besides

This word is used to introduce an extra point or reason that supports or relates to the previous statement. It is commonly used in both formal and informal writing.

  • For example, “I don’t eat meat. Besides, it’s better for the environment.”
  • In a discussion about hobbies, someone might say, “I enjoy painting and playing the guitar. Besides, they help me relax and express my creativity.”
  • An article about the benefits of exercise might state, “Regular physical activity can improve cardiovascular health. Besides, it can also boost mood and reduce stress levels.”

6. Moreover

Moreover is a formal term used to introduce additional information or to emphasize a point. It is often used in academic or professional writing.

  • For example, “The study found that exercise improves cardiovascular health. Moreover, it also reduces the risk of chronic diseases.”
  • In a business presentation, one might say, “Our company has seen an increase in sales this quarter. Moreover, customer satisfaction has also improved.”
  • A news article might state, “The government has implemented new policies to address climate change. Moreover, they have also allocated funds for renewable energy projects.”

7. What’s more

What’s more is a phrase used to introduce an additional point or emphasize a statement. It is commonly used in casual conversations or informal writing.

  • For instance, “I heard that the concert tickets are selling fast. What’s more, there will be a special guest performance.”
  • In a discussion about travel, someone might say, “The hotel offers free breakfast. What’s more, they have a rooftop pool with a stunning view.”
  • A person sharing good news might exclaim, “I got a promotion at work! What’s more, I also received a raise.”

8. On top of that

On top of that is a phrase used to introduce another point or add to a previous statement. It is often used in informal conversations or written communication.

  • For example, “The restaurant has a great menu with a variety of options. On top of that, the service is excellent.”
  • In a discussion about a new smartphone, someone might mention, “The device has a powerful processor. On top of that, it also has a high-resolution camera.”
  • A person talking about their achievements might say, “I completed a marathon last year. On top of that, I also climbed Mount Everest.”

9. As well

As well is a phrase used to indicate that something is in addition to what has already been mentioned. It is a versatile term that can be used in both formal and informal contexts.

  • For instance, “He is a talented musician. As well, he is an accomplished painter.”
  • In a conversation about hobbies, someone might say, “I enjoy playing tennis. As well, I like to go hiking.”
  • A person discussing their qualifications might mention, “I have a bachelor’s degree in business. As well, I have completed several professional certifications.”

10. Likewise

Likewise is a term used to indicate that something is similar to or corresponds with what has just been mentioned. It is commonly used in both spoken and written communication.

  • For example, “She enjoys reading books. Likewise, she also loves watching movies.”
  • In a discussion about travel destinations, someone might say, “I visited Paris last year. Likewise, I would love to explore Rome.”
  • A person expressing agreement might respond with, “I think it’s important to prioritize health. Likewise, regular exercise is essential.”

11. Too

This is a word used to indicate that something is in addition to what has already been mentioned or is similar in nature.

  • For example, “I love pizza too!”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to the party too.”
  • In a conversation about favorite movies, someone might add, “I like that one too!”

12. Further

This word is used to introduce an additional point or to indicate that something is extending or advancing beyond what has already been mentioned.

  • For instance, “Further, we need to consider the environmental impact.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “We need to further develop our ideas.”
  • A person might argue, “Furthermore, this policy will benefit the economy.”

13. And

This is a simple word used to add another point or to introduce an additional piece of information.

  • For example, “I love chocolate and ice cream.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might say, “I want to visit Italy and France.”
  • A person might state, “I studied hard and got good grades.”

14. In addition

This phrase is used to introduce an additional point or to emphasize that something is also true or relevant.

  • For instance, “In addition, we need to consider the cost.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “Moreover, our team has extensive experience.”
  • A person might argue, “In addition to the health benefits, exercise can also improve mental well-being.”

15. Equally

This word is used to indicate that something is the same or similar in a particular way.

  • For example, “I am equally excited about both options.”
  • In a conversation about favorite foods, someone might say, “I enjoy both pizza and pasta equally.”
  • A person might argue, “Similarly, both candidates have strong qualifications.”

16. Similarly

This term is used to indicate that something is comparable or similar to what was previously mentioned. It suggests that the new information aligns with or supports the previous point.

  • For example, “He enjoys playing the piano. Similarly, he also loves playing the guitar.”
  • In a discussion about different types of sports, one might say, “Football and rugby are both contact sports. Similarly, they require physical strength and endurance.”
  • A person might argue, “Just as exercise is important for physical health, similarly, mental exercise is crucial for cognitive well-being.”

17. In the same vein

This phrase is used to introduce a related idea or topic that is similar to what was previously mentioned. It suggests that the new information follows the same line of thought or reasoning.

  • For instance, “She enjoys reading mystery novels. In the same vein, she also enjoys watching crime dramas.”
  • In a discussion about different genres of music, one might say, “Rock and punk music are often associated with rebellion. In the same vein, they both challenge societal norms.”
  • A person might argue, “Just as honesty is important in personal relationships, in the same vein, it is crucial in professional relationships.”

18. Correspondingly

This term is used to indicate that something is in agreement or corresponds with what was previously mentioned. It suggests that the new information is in line with or goes hand in hand with the previous point.

  • For example, “She studied hard and got good grades. Correspondingly, she was accepted into her dream university.”
  • In a discussion about cause and effect, one might say, “Increased pollution levels lead to health problems. Correspondingly, efforts to reduce pollution can improve public health.”
  • A person might argue, “Just as positive actions have positive consequences, correspondingly, negative actions have negative consequences.”

19. Not to mention

This phrase is used to introduce an additional point or idea that is worth mentioning but may have been overlooked or not explicitly stated. It suggests that the new information adds to the previous point and should be taken into consideration.

  • For instance, “He has won numerous awards for his acting skills. Not to mention, he also volunteers at a local charity.”
  • In a discussion about the benefits of exercise, one might say, “Regular physical activity improves cardiovascular health. Not to mention, it also boosts mental well-being.”
  • A person might argue, “Education is important for personal development. Not to mention, it also plays a crucial role in societal progress.”

20. In addition to that

This phrase is used to introduce an additional point or idea that is related to what was previously mentioned. It suggests that the new information enhances or supplements the previous point.

  • For example, “She is a talented singer. In addition to that, she is also a skilled dancer.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, one might say, “Reducing carbon emissions is essential. In addition to that, promoting renewable energy sources can help mitigate the impacts.”
  • A person might argue, “Regular exercise improves physical health. In addition to that, it also has positive effects on mental health.”

21. Apart from that

This phrase is used to introduce an additional point or piece of information. It is often used to emphasize a related idea or to provide further support for a previous statement.

  • For example, “I love pizza. Apart from that, I also enjoy pasta.”
  • In a discussion about hobbies, someone might say, “I enjoy playing guitar. Apart from that, I also like to paint.”
  • A person discussing their travel experiences might mention, “I’ve been to several countries in Europe. Apart from that, I’ve also visited Japan and Australia.”

22. In the same way

This phrase is used to indicate that something is done or happens in a similar manner as something else. It is often used to draw comparisons or make analogies.

  • For instance, “Just as birds build nests, humans create homes. In the same way, both provide shelter and security.”
  • In a discussion about cooking, someone might say, “In the same way that you follow a recipe, you also need to follow proper technique.”
  • A person explaining a concept might say, “In the same way that plants need sunlight to grow, humans need knowledge to thrive.”

23. By the same token

This phrase is used to indicate that a statement or action applies in a similar manner to a previous statement or action. It is often used to draw logical connections or highlight similarities.

  • For example, “If you want to succeed, you need to work hard. By the same token, if you want to lose weight, you need to eat healthy and exercise.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “Trust is important in a friendship. By the same token, it is also crucial in a romantic relationship.”
  • A person explaining a rule might say, “You should treat others with respect. By the same token, you should expect to be treated with respect.”

24. In like manner

This phrase is used to indicate that something is done or happens in a similar manner as something else. It is often used to draw comparisons or make analogies.

  • For instance, “Just as plants need water to grow, animals need food. In like manner, both are necessary for survival.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might say, “In like manner to clothing, accessories can enhance an outfit.”
  • A person explaining a concept might say, “In like manner to a puzzle, each piece of information fits together to form a complete picture.”

25. Also, too

These words are used to introduce an additional point or piece of information. They are often used to emphasize a related idea or to provide further support for a previous statement.

  • For example, “I enjoy hiking. Also, I love swimming.”
  • In a discussion about favorite books, someone might say, “I enjoy fantasy novels. Also, I’m a big fan of mystery novels.”
  • A person describing their skills might say, “I can play the piano. Also, I can sing.”

26. In a similar fashion

This phrase is used to indicate that something is done or happening in the same manner or style as something else.

  • For example, “He dressed in a similar fashion to his favorite celebrity.”
  • In a discussion about cooking techniques, someone might say, “You can cook the vegetables in a similar fashion to the way you would roast them.”
  • When describing a friend’s behavior, one might comment, “She handled the situation in a similar fashion to how you would have.”
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