Top 44 Slang For Most Obvious – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing the most obvious, sometimes words just aren’t enough. But fear not, our team has put together a list of slang terms that will help you convey the most blatant of truths in a fun and trendy way. From everyday phrases to internet memes, we’ve got you covered with the latest and greatest slang for when it’s just too obvious. So sit back, relax, and get ready to upgrade your vocabulary game with our top picks!

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1. Couldn’t miss it if you tried

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is so obvious that it is impossible to overlook or ignore. It implies that even if someone were actively trying to miss it, they would still notice it.

  • For example, “The giant billboard on the highway is so bright and colorful, you couldn’t miss it if you tried.”
  • When referring to a person’s loud and attention-grabbing outfit, someone might say, “She’s wearing a bright pink feather boa and a sequined hat, you couldn’t miss her if you tried.”
  • In a discussion about a major news event, someone might say, “The story was all over the front page of every newspaper, you couldn’t miss it if you tried.”

2. Like a neon sign

This phrase compares something to a neon sign, which is known for its bright and attention-grabbing qualities. It implies that something is so obvious and prominent that it stands out and catches people’s attention.

  • For instance, “Her new haircut is like a neon sign, it’s so different and eye-catching.”
  • When describing a building with vibrant colors and unique architecture, someone might say, “The hotel stands out in the city skyline like a neon sign.”
  • In a discussion about a celebrity’s outrageous behavior, someone might comment, “Their antics are like a neon sign, impossible to ignore.”

3. Open secret

This term refers to information or knowledge that is widely known or understood by many people, even though it is not publicly acknowledged or openly discussed.

  • For example, “It’s an open secret that the company’s CEO is planning to retire next year.”
  • When referring to a celebrity’s private life that is known by their fans but not confirmed by the celebrity themselves, someone might say, “Their relationship is an open secret among their fans.”
  • In a discussion about a politician’s hidden agenda, someone might comment, “It’s becoming an open secret that they have ulterior motives.”

4. No brainer

This phrase describes a decision or choice that is extremely easy and requires little or no thought or consideration.

  • For instance, “Choosing between ice cream and broccoli for dessert was a no brainer.”
  • When discussing a job offer with significantly higher pay and better benefits, someone might say, “Taking the new job was a no brainer.”
  • In a discussion about a vacation destination with beautiful beaches and perfect weather, someone might comment, “Visiting that island paradise is a no brainer.”

5. In plain sight

This phrase describes something that is clearly visible or noticeable to anyone who is looking or paying attention. It implies that something is not hidden or concealed.

  • For example, “The missing keys were in plain sight on the kitchen counter the whole time.”
  • When referring to a famous landmark that is easily visible from a distance, someone might say, “The Statue of Liberty is in plain sight as you approach New York City.”
  • In a discussion about a suspicious activity happening in a crowded area, someone might comment, “The pickpocket was operating in plain sight, but nobody noticed.”

6. Written all over your face

This phrase means that someone’s true thoughts, feelings, or intentions are clearly visible on their face. It implies that the person’s facial expression is so obvious that it reveals their inner thoughts or emotions without them needing to say anything.

  • For example, if someone is trying to hide their disappointment but their face clearly shows it, you could say, “Your disappointment is written all over your face.”
  • In a situation where someone is trying to act confident but their nervousness is evident, you might say, “Your nervousness is written all over your face.”
  • If someone is trying to pretend they’re not interested in something but their excitement is apparent, you could say, “Your excitement is written all over your face.”

7. Jumping out at you

This phrase means that something is extremely noticeable or attention-grabbing. It suggests that the thing or situation is so obvious that it immediately catches your attention.

  • For instance, if you see a bright red sports car driving down the street, you could say, “That car is jumping out at you.”
  • If there’s a sign with flashing lights and bold colors, you might say, “The sign is jumping out at you.”
  • In a crowded room, if someone is wearing a vibrant and unique outfit, you could say, “Their outfit is jumping out at you.”

8. Like a flashing light

This phrase means that something is very obvious or conspicuous, just like a flashing light that grabs your attention. It implies that the thing or situation is hard to miss or ignore.

  • For example, if someone is wearing a neon pink shirt in a sea of black and white, you could say, “They stand out like a flashing light.”
  • If someone’s mistake is glaringly obvious, you might say, “The mistake is like a flashing light.”
  • In a situation where someone’s talent or skill is exceptional and stands out, you could say, “Their talent shines like a flashing light.”

9. Loud and clear

This phrase means that something is very clear, easily understood, or noticeable. It suggests that there is no ambiguity or confusion in the message or situation.

  • For instance, if someone speaks directly into a microphone and their voice is amplified, you could say, “Their voice comes through loud and clear.”
  • If someone sends a text message with a straightforward and unambiguous statement, you might reply, “I got your message loud and clear.”
  • In a situation where someone makes a bold and unambiguous statement, you could say, “Their message is loud and clear.”

10. Like a bull in a china shop

This phrase means that someone is behaving in a clumsy or reckless manner, often resulting in unintended consequences or damage. It implies that the person is not being careful or considerate in their actions.

  • For example, if someone is walking through a room filled with delicate and fragile objects and bumps into everything, you could say, “They’re like a bull in a china shop.”
  • If someone is trying to fix a delicate piece of equipment but ends up causing more damage, you might say, “They’re handling it like a bull in a china shop.”
  • In a situation where someone is being overly aggressive and not considering the consequences of their actions, you could say, “They’re charging ahead like a bull in a china shop.”

11. Slap in the face

This phrase refers to something that is extremely obvious and shocking, as if it were a physical slap in the face. It is often used to describe situations or actions that are impossible to ignore.

  • For example, “The evidence against him was a slap in the face.”
  • In a discussion about a blatant lie, someone might say, “His excuse was a slap in the face to everyone’s intelligence.”
  • When someone makes a blatantly offensive comment, it can be described as a “verbal slap in the face.”

12. Stands out like a sore thumb

This expression is used to describe something or someone that is very easily noticeable or stands out in a noticeable way. It often implies that the thing or person is out of place or different from the surrounding environment.

  • For instance, “Her bright red dress stood out like a sore thumb at the funeral.”
  • In a conversation about a group of people, one might say, “The tourist stood out like a sore thumb in the crowd of locals.”
  • When discussing an obvious mistake, someone might comment, “The error in the report stands out like a sore thumb.”

13. Clear as a bell

This phrase is used to describe something that is very clear and easy to understand. It often refers to information or communication that is not ambiguous or confusing.

  • For example, “Her instructions were clear as a bell, and I had no trouble following them.”
  • In a discussion about a well-written article, someone might say, “The author’s points were clear as a bell.”
  • When explaining a simple concept, someone might say, “It’s as clear as a bell: the sun rises in the east and sets in the west.”

14. Smack in the face

This phrase is used to describe something that is blatantly obvious and impossible to ignore. It implies that the thing or situation is so clear and evident that it feels like a physical impact.

  • For instance, “The truth was staring him smack in the face, but he refused to acknowledge it.”
  • In a conversation about an obvious mistake, someone might say, “The error in the report is a smack in the face.”
  • When discussing a shocking revelation, someone might comment, “The evidence was a smack in the face for everyone who doubted.”

15. Written all over it

This phrase is used to indicate that something is clearly indicated or evident. It implies that the signs or indications of a particular thing or situation are so clear that they are like writing on a surface.

  • For example, “Her excitement was written all over her face.”
  • In a discussion about a person’s intentions, someone might say, “The signs of his ambition are written all over him.”
  • When describing a situation with obvious implications, someone might comment, “The success of the project is written all over it.”

16. Staring you in the eye

When something is “staring you in the eye,” it means that it is extremely obvious and cannot be ignored or overlooked.

  • For example, “The answer to the problem was staring me in the eye the whole time.”
  • In a discussion about a clear mistake, someone might say, “The error is staring you in the eye, how did you miss it?”
  • When talking about an obvious solution, one might say, “The solution is staring us in the eye, we just need to act on it.”

17. Can’t be denied

When something “can’t be denied,” it means that it is so obvious and evident that it cannot be disputed or ignored.

  • For instance, “The fact that he cheated on the test can’t be denied, the evidence is clear.”
  • In a debate about a controversial topic, someone might say, “The impact of climate change can’t be denied, the data is overwhelming.”
  • When discussing a person’s talent, one might say, “Her musical abilities can’t be denied, she is incredibly talented.”

18. Couldn’t be plainer

When something “couldn’t be plainer,” it means that it is incredibly clear and obvious, leaving no room for confusion or doubt.

  • For example, “The message in his speech couldn’t be plainer, he wants us to work together.”
  • In a discussion about a straightforward decision, someone might say, “The choice between the two options couldn’t be plainer, it’s obvious which one is better.”
  • When describing an unmistakable sign, one might say, “The warning label couldn’t be plainer, it clearly states the dangers.”

19. Hard to miss

When something is “hard to miss,” it means that it is very noticeable and difficult to overlook or ignore.

  • For instance, “The bright red sign is hard to miss, you can’t miss it even from a distance.”
  • In a conversation about a prominent feature, someone might say, “The giant statue in the park is hard to miss, it’s the first thing you see.”
  • When discussing a glaring mistake, one might say, “The error in the report is hard to miss, it’s right at the top.”

20. Glaringly apparent

When something is “glaringly apparent,” it means that it is extremely obvious and impossible to ignore or overlook.

  • For example, “The lack of preparation was glaringly apparent, it was clear they didn’t put in any effort.”
  • In a discussion about a significant problem, someone might say, “The flaws in the system are glaringly apparent, they need to be addressed.”
  • When describing a blatant contradiction, one might say, “The inconsistency in his statements is glaringly apparent, it’s hard to believe him.”

21. Undeniably clear

This phrase is used to describe something that is unmistakably clear or obvious.

  • For example, “The evidence presented in court was undeniably clear and proved the defendant’s guilt.”
  • In a discussion about a movie twist, someone might say, “The foreshadowing made the plot twist undeniably clear.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Your answer is undeniably clear and shows a deep understanding of the topic.”

22. As plain as the nose on your face

This expression emphasizes that something is very obvious and cannot be missed.

  • For instance, “The answer to the riddle was as plain as the nose on your face.”
  • When someone points out an obvious fact, you might respond, “Well, that’s as plain as the nose on your face.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might say, “The solution to this problem is as plain as the nose on your face!”

23. Couldn’t be more transparent

This phrase indicates that something is so obvious that it cannot be any clearer or more evident.

  • For example, “The politician’s motives couldn’t be more transparent; it’s clear they are only interested in personal gain.”
  • When someone states an obvious fact, you might sarcastically comment, “Well, that couldn’t be more transparent.”
  • In a discussion about a deceptive advertisement, someone might say, “The hidden agenda behind this ad couldn’t be more transparent.”

24. Standing out like a beacon

This phrase describes something that is easily noticed or stands out prominently.

  • For instance, “Her bright red dress stood out like a beacon in the crowd.”
  • When someone wears a flashy outfit, you might say, “You’re standing out like a beacon in that outfit.”
  • In a discussion about a striking piece of artwork, someone might comment, “The colors used in this painting make it stand out like a beacon.”

25. Can’t be overlooked

This phrase emphasizes that something is so noticeable or significant that it cannot be ignored.

  • For example, “The impact of climate change on our planet can’t be overlooked; it requires immediate action.”
  • When someone points out a crucial detail, you might acknowledge, “You’re right, that can’t be overlooked.”
  • In a conversation about an important issue, someone might say, “The social implications of this problem can’t be overlooked.”

26. Written in bold letters

This phrase is used to describe something that is extremely clear or easy to see. It suggests that the information is presented in a way that cannot be ignored or overlooked.

  • For example, “The answer to the question was written in bold letters on the whiteboard.”
  • A person might say, “The message was written in bold letters, so there was no way to miss it.”
  • In a discussion about signs, someone might comment, “Important information should always be written in bold letters for maximum visibility.”

27. As obvious as it gets

This expression emphasizes that something is as straightforward and evident as possible. It implies that there is no room for confusion or doubt.

  • For instance, “The answer to the riddle was as obvious as it gets.”
  • A person might say, “It’s as obvious as it gets that she’s in love with him.”
  • In a conversation about a mistake, someone might remark, “The error in the report was as obvious as it gets.”

28. Like a billboard

This phrase compares something to a billboard, which is a large outdoor sign designed to attract attention. It suggests that the thing being described is highly visible and easily noticed.

  • For example, “Her bright red dress stood out in the crowd like a billboard.”
  • A person might say, “The neon sign was like a billboard, drawing everyone’s attention.”
  • In a discussion about advertising, someone might comment, “A catchy slogan can make a brand’s message like a billboard in people’s minds.”

29. Glaringly conspicuous

This expression describes something that is very obvious and stands out prominently. It suggests that the thing being described is hard to miss or ignore.

  • For instance, “The typo in the document was glaringly conspicuous.”
  • A person might say, “His extravagant outfit made him glaringly conspicuous at the party.”
  • In a conversation about a mistake, someone might remark, “The error in the painting was glaringly conspicuous to art enthusiasts.”

30. Like a spotlight

This phrase compares something to a spotlight, which is a powerful beam of light that illuminates a specific area. It suggests that the thing being described is easily seen and draws attention.

  • For example, “Her talent on stage shone like a spotlight.”
  • A person might say, “The new product launch was like a spotlight, capturing everyone’s attention.”
  • In a discussion about achievements, someone might comment, “Winning the award put her in the spotlight and opened doors for her career.”

31. Undeniably apparent

When something is undeniably apparent, it means that it is extremely clear and obvious. This phrase is often used to emphasize the certainty and clarity of a situation or fact.

  • For example, “The evidence against the suspect was undeniably apparent.”
  • In a discussion about a movie plot twist, one might say, “The twist ending was undeniably apparent from the beginning.”
  • A person might exclaim, “The answer to that question is undeniably apparent!”

32. Couldn’t be more conspicuous

When something couldn’t be more conspicuous, it means that it is extremely noticeable and impossible to miss. This phrase is often used to emphasize the level of visibility or attention something receives.

  • For instance, “The bright red car parked in the middle of the street couldn’t be more conspicuous.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “Her outfit was so unique, she couldn’t be more conspicuous.”
  • A person might comment, “With that hairstyle, you couldn’t be more conspicuous in a crowd!”

33. Standing out like a lighthouse

When something is standing out like a lighthouse, it means that it is highly visible and easily noticeable. This phrase often compares the visibility of something to the prominent and easily recognizable nature of a lighthouse.

  • For example, “The neon sign was standing out like a lighthouse in the dark.”
  • In a discussion about a standout performance, someone might say, “Her talent on stage was standing out like a lighthouse.”
  • A person might comment, “With that bright red jacket, you’re standing out like a lighthouse in a sea of black coats!”

34. Can’t be mistaken

When something can’t be mistaken, it means that it is unmistakable and impossible to confuse with something else. This phrase is often used to emphasize the clarity and uniqueness of a certain characteristic or feature.

  • For instance, “The sound of his laughter can’t be mistaken for anyone else’s.”
  • In a conversation about identifying a specific person, someone might say, “His distinctive tattoos make him can’t be mistaken.”
  • A person might comment, “With her bright red hair, she can’t be mistaken in a crowd!”

35. Written in black and white

When something is written in black and white, it means that it is clearly stated or documented, leaving no room for confusion or interpretation. This phrase often refers to information or rules that are presented in a straightforward and unambiguous manner.

  • For example, “The terms and conditions were written in black and white.”
  • In a discussion about a contract, someone might say, “The payment terms were written in black and white.”
  • A person might comment, “The rules of the game are written in black and white, so there’s no room for cheating!”

36. As clear as crystal

This phrase is used to describe something that is extremely clear or easy to understand.

  • For example, “The answer to the problem was as clear as crystal.”
  • A person might say, “The evidence against him is as clear as crystal.”
  • In a discussion about a straightforward decision, someone might comment, “The right choice is as clear as crystal.”

37. Hard to overlook

This phrase is used to describe something that is very easy to notice or see.

  • For instance, “The bright red sign was hard to overlook.”
  • A person might say, “His loud and obnoxious behavior is hard to overlook.”
  • In a conversation about a prominent feature, someone might comment, “The tall building is hard to overlook.”

38. Glaringly evident

This phrase is used to describe something that is very obvious or apparent.

  • For example, “The mistake in the report was glaringly evident.”
  • A person might say, “Her lack of preparation was glaringly evident.”
  • In a discussion about a clear contradiction, someone might comment, “The inconsistency in his story is glaringly evident.”

39. Like a glaring error

This phrase is used to compare something to a mistake that is very obvious or easy to spot.

  • For instance, “The incorrect answer stood out like a glaring error.”
  • A person might say, “His poor grammar was like a glaring error.”
  • In a conversation about an obvious flaw, someone might comment, “The missing information was like a glaring error.”

40. Undeniably clear-cut

This phrase is used to describe something that is completely and unquestionably obvious or straightforward.

  • For example, “The winner of the competition was undeniably clear-cut.”
  • A person might say, “The evidence against him is undeniably clear-cut.”
  • In a discussion about a definitive conclusion, someone might comment, “The answer to the problem is undeniably clear-cut.”

41. Couldn’t be more overt

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is extremely clear and unmistakable.

  • For example, “The message in his speech couldn’t be more overt; he clearly stated his intentions.”
  • In a discussion about a movie’s plot, someone might say, “The twist at the end couldn’t be more overt; it was predictable from the beginning.”
  • A person observing a situation might comment, “The tension in the room couldn’t be more overt; everyone could feel it.”

42. In your face

This slang phrase is used to describe something that is very obvious and impossible to ignore.

  • For instance, “The advertisement was in your face, with bright colors and loud music.”
  • In a discussion about a person’s behavior, someone might say, “His arrogance was in your face; he made sure everyone knew how important he thought he was.”
  • A person describing a sporting event might comment, “The competition was in your face, with intense action and aggressive players.”

43. Couldn’t be clearer

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is extremely easy to understand and leaves no room for confusion.

  • For example, “The instructions couldn’t be clearer; they were written in simple language with step-by-step illustrations.”
  • In a discussion about a decision, someone might say, “His intentions couldn’t be clearer; he made it clear that he wanted to end the relationship.”
  • A person explaining a concept might comment, “The benefits of exercise couldn’t be clearer; it improves physical and mental health in numerous ways.”

44. Like a beacon

This slang phrase is used to describe something that is very easy to see or notice, often because it stands out.

  • For instance, “Her bright red dress was like a beacon in the crowd; it was impossible to miss.”
  • In a discussion about a landmark, someone might say, “The lighthouse is like a beacon, guiding ships safely to shore.”
  • A person describing a person’s personality might comment, “Her enthusiasm is like a beacon; it brightens up any room she enters.”
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