Top 21 Slang For Move Quickly – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing the need to move quickly, there are a plethora of slang terms that can convey that sense of urgency in a fun and relatable way. Whether you’re looking to spice up your vocabulary or just curious about the latest trendy phrases, our team has got you covered. Get ready to pick up some new linguistic speed with our compilation of the most popular slang for moving quickly. So buckle up and get ready to zoom through this list!

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1. Zoom

To “zoom” means to move rapidly or quickly. It is often used to describe moving at a high speed, either physically or metaphorically.

  • For example, “I zoomed past the other runners and won the race.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to zoom through this report before the deadline.”
  • Another usage could be, “The car zoomed down the highway, leaving a trail of dust behind.”

2. Dash

To “dash” means to run or move quickly in a specific direction. It implies a sense of urgency or haste.

  • For instance, “He dashed across the street to catch the bus.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to dash to the grocery store before it closes.”
  • Another usage could be, “The children dashed out of the classroom when the bell rang.”

3. Bolt

To “bolt” means to run away or move suddenly and quickly. It can also be used to describe a sudden burst of speed or movement.

  • For example, “The rabbit bolted when it heard a loud noise.”
  • Someone might say, “I saw a spider and bolted out of the room.”
  • Another usage could be, “The athlete bolted out of the starting blocks and took an early lead.”

4. Scoot

To “scoot” means to move quickly or hurriedly, often in a small or short distance. It can also imply a sense of playfulness or mischief.

  • For instance, “The child scooted across the floor on their knees.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to scoot over to make room for another person.”
  • Another usage could be, “She scooted out of the room before anyone could ask her questions.”

5. Hustle

To “hustle” means to move or work energetically and quickly, often with a sense of purpose or determination. It can also imply a sense of busyness or being in a hurry.

  • For example, “He hustled to finish his work before the deadline.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to hustle to catch my flight.”
  • Another usage could be, “The team hustled on the basketball court, giving their all to win the game.”

6. Zip

This slang term refers to moving rapidly or swiftly from one place to another. It can also be used to describe the sound or action of something moving quickly.

  • For example, “I need to zip over to the store and grab some milk.”
  • A person might say, “He zipped past me on his bike.”
  • Another example could be, “The car zipped down the highway, leaving a trail of dust behind.”

7. Tear

When used as slang, “tear” means to move at a very high speed or in a reckless manner. It implies a sense of urgency or intensity in the movement.

  • For instance, “He tore down the street on his motorcycle.”
  • A person might say, “I need to tear through this work so I can leave early.”
  • Another example could be, “The athlete tore across the finish line, setting a new record.”

8. Rush

This slang term refers to moving with speed or urgency, often in a hurried or frantic manner. It can also imply a sense of excitement or exhilaration in the movement.

  • For example, “I need to rush to catch my flight.”
  • A person might say, “She rushed past me, late for her meeting.”
  • Another example could be, “The students rushed out of the classroom when the bell rang.”

9. Dart

When used as slang, “dart” means to move quickly and suddenly, often in a zigzag or unpredictable manner. It implies a sense of agility or evasiveness in the movement.

  • For instance, “The rabbit darted across the field.”
  • A person might say, “She darted through the crowded streets, trying to catch the bus.”
  • Another example could be, “The soccer player darted past the defenders, heading towards the goal.”

10. Whiz

This slang term refers to moving very quickly or rapidly. It can also imply a sense of skill or expertise in the movement.

  • For example, “The car whizzed by me on the highway.”
  • A person might say, “He whizzed through the obstacle course, completing it in record time.”
  • Another example could be, “The skateboarder whizzed down the ramp, performing impressive tricks.”

11. Race

To move quickly or hurriedly. “Race” is often used to describe moving at a fast pace, as if in a competition.

  • For example, “I raced to catch the bus before it left.”
  • A person might say, “I need to race to the store before it closes.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “He raced down the field to score the winning goal.”

12. Charge

To move quickly and suddenly. “Charge” is often used to describe moving with a purpose or determination.

  • For instance, “He charged towards the finish line.”
  • A person might say, “I need to charge through this crowd to get to the front.”
  • In a military context, a commander might order, “Charge towards the enemy!”

13. Hasten

To accelerate or increase the speed of movement. “Hasten” implies a sense of urgency or the need to move quickly.

  • For example, “I hastened my pace to catch up with my friends.”
  • A person might say, “We need to hasten our progress to meet the deadline.”
  • In a race, a coach might shout, “Hasten your stride and finish strong!”

14. Skedaddle

To move quickly or hastily, often in a chaotic or disorderly manner. “Skedaddle” is a playful and informal term for moving rapidly.

  • For instance, “When the rain started pouring, we skedaddled indoors.”
  • A person might say, “I need to skedaddle out of here before it gets too crowded.”
  • In a playful context, friends might say, “Let’s skedaddle to the beach for a day of fun!”

15. Hightail

To move quickly or hastily, particularly in order to escape from a place or situation. “Hightail” implies a sense of urgency or the need to move swiftly to avoid something.

  • For example, “We hightailed it out of the party before it got too rowdy.”
  • A person might say, “I need to hightail out of the office to catch my flight.”
  • In a dangerous situation, someone might shout, “Hightail it out of here, there’s a fire!”

16. Skitter

– The mouse skittered across the floor, trying to avoid being caught by the cat.

  • The leaves skittered along the pavement as the wind picked up.
  • The spider skittered away as soon as I turned on the light.
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17. Scamper

– The children scampered across the playground, laughing and chasing each other.

  • The squirrel scampered up the tree, trying to find a safe place to hide its acorn.
  • The dog scampered away when it heard its owner call its name.

18. Skip

– The little girl skipped down the street, holding her mother’s hand.

  • The kangaroo skipped across the field, effortlessly covering large distances.
  • The dancer skipped across the stage, showcasing their agility and grace.

19. Scuttle

– The crab scuttled along the sandy beach, searching for food.

  • The mouse scuttled into its hole as soon as it heard a loud noise.
  • The waiter scuttled between tables, delivering orders and clearing plates.

20. Bound

– The athlete bounded across the finish line, breaking the world record.

  • The puppy bounded towards its owner, wagging its tail in delight.
  • The deer bounded gracefully through the forest, effortlessly jumping over fallen logs.

21. Flit

To “flit” means to move swiftly or quickly from one place to another. It is often used to describe a light and quick movement, similar to a bird or butterfly flitting from flower to flower.

  • For example, “She flitted through the crowd, trying to catch a glimpse of the celebrity.”
  • In a race, a runner might be described as “flitting” past their competitors with ease.
  • A person might say, “I need to flit to the store and grab some groceries before it closes.”