Top 41 Slang For Movements – Meaning & Usage

Movements, whether social, cultural, or political, are often at the forefront of societal change and progress. Understanding the slang terms associated with these movements can help you navigate conversations and stay informed. Let us guide you through a curated list of the most popular and impactful slang for movements, so you can be in the know and join the conversation with confidence.

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1. Bust a move

This phrase is used to encourage someone to start dancing or to show off their dance skills. It is often used in a playful or enthusiastic manner.

  • For example, at a party, someone might say, “Come on, bust a move on the dance floor!”
  • In a dance competition, a judge might comment, “He really knows how to bust a move.”
  • A friend might cheer on another friend, saying, “I know you can bust a move, show them what you’ve got!”

2. Shake a leg

This phrase is used to tell someone to hurry up or to start moving quickly. It is often used in a casual or friendly manner.

  • For instance, if someone is taking too long to get ready, you might say, “Come on, shake a leg, we’re going to be late!”
  • In a sports game, a coach might shout, “Shake a leg, we need to score before time runs out!”
  • A parent might use this phrase to motivate their child to get out of bed in the morning, saying, “Time to wake up, shake a leg and get ready for school!”

3. Hit the road

This phrase is used to indicate the beginning of a journey or the act of leaving a place. It is often used in a casual or informal manner.

  • For example, if you are ready to leave a friend’s house, you might say, “Well, it’s time to hit the road, thanks for having me!”
  • When starting a road trip, someone might announce, “Everyone buckle up, it’s time to hit the road!”
  • A traveler might post on social media, “Just packed my bags, ready to hit the road and explore new places!”

4. Book it

This phrase is used to describe the act of running or moving quickly. It is often used in a more urgent or intense context.

  • For instance, if you are late for a meeting, you might say, “I need to book it to the office!”
  • In a chase scene in a movie, a character might yell, “Book it, they’re right behind us!”
  • A friend might encourage another friend to run faster by saying, “Come on, book it, we’re almost at the finish line!”

5. Haul ass

This phrase is used to tell someone to move quickly or to hurry up. It is often used in a more informal or emphatic manner.

  • For example, if someone is taking too long to get ready, you might say, “Hurry up and haul ass, we’re going to miss the bus!”
  • In a race, a coach might yell, “Haul ass, you’re almost at the finish line!”
  • A person might use this phrase to motivate themselves to work faster, saying, “I need to haul ass and finish this project before the deadline!”

6. Make tracks

This slang phrase means to leave a place or situation quickly. It implies a sense of urgency or the need to move on.

  • For example, “I have to make tracks if I want to catch my train.”
  • Someone might say, “We should make tracks before it starts raining.”
  • A person in a hurry might say, “Sorry, I have to make tracks. I’m running late.”

7. Get a move on

This phrase is used to tell someone to hurry or to start moving.

  • For instance, “Come on, get a move on! We’re going to be late.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “We need to leave soon, so get a move on.”
  • Someone might say, “I have a lot to do today, so I better get a move on.”

8. Take a hike

This slang phrase is used to tell someone to leave or go away, often in a dismissive or annoyed manner.

  • For example, “I don’t want to talk to you anymore. Take a hike!”
  • Someone might say to a persistent salesperson, “I’m not interested, so take a hike.”
  • A person might say to a friend who is bothering them, “I need some space right now. Take a hike.”

9. Bounce

This slang term means to leave a place or situation. It can imply a quick or sudden departure.

  • For instance, “I’m tired, so I think I’m going to bounce.”
  • Someone might say, “This party is boring. Let’s bounce and find something better.”
  • A person might say, “I have to bounce. I have an early morning tomorrow.”

10. Dip out

This slang phrase means to leave a place or situation suddenly or unexpectedly.

  • For example, “I was at the party, but then I had to dip out because something came up.”
  • Someone might say, “I don’t like this crowd. I’m going to dip out before things get messy.”
  • A person might say, “I didn’t want to cause a scene, so I just dipped out quietly.”

11. Roll out

This slang term means to leave or depart from a place. It can be used in a variety of contexts to indicate a quick or sudden departure.

  • For example, “I need to roll out of here before the traffic gets worse.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s roll out of this party and find somewhere more fun.”
  • In a military context, a commander might give the order, “Roll out, soldiers! We have a mission to complete.”

12. Jet

To “jet” means to leave or depart quickly, often with a sense of urgency. It can be used to describe a rapid departure from a location.

  • For instance, “I need to jet out of here and catch my flight.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s jet before the rain starts.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’ll jet after I finish this last task.”

13. Skedaddle

This slang term means to leave or depart in a hurry, often with a sense of urgency. It is typically used in a playful or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, “I need to skedaddle before I’m late for my appointment.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s skedaddle out of here before the crowd gets too big.”
  • In a humorous context, someone might say, “I saw a spider and skedaddled out of the room!”

14. Scoot

To “scoot” means to go or move quickly, often with a sense of haste. It can be used to describe a rapid movement or departure.

  • For instance, “I need to scoot to catch the bus.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s scoot out of here before the rain starts.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’ll scoot over to your place after work.”

15. Skip town

The slang term “skip town” means to leave a place suddenly and without notice, often to avoid trouble or responsibilities. It can be used to describe a hasty departure from a location.

  • For example, “He skipped town after he found out the police were looking for him.”
  • A person might say, “I’m thinking about skipping town and starting fresh somewhere else.”
  • In a fictional story, a character might say, “I had to skip town to escape the dangerous situation I was in.”

16. Cruise

This slang term is often used to describe someone who is moving or traveling in a relaxed and effortless manner.

  • For example, “He cruised down the street on his skateboard.”
  • A person might say, “I’m just going to cruise through this project.”
  • Another might comment, “She cruised through the dance routine with ease.”

17. Saunter

This term refers to a leisurely and relaxed way of walking or strolling.

  • For instance, “He sauntered into the room, exuding confidence.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s take a saunter around the park.”
  • Another might comment, “She sauntered down the runway, captivating the audience.”

18. Strut

This slang term describes a confident and self-assured way of walking.

  • For example, “He strutted into the party, turning heads.”
  • A person might say, “She knows how to strut her stuff on the catwalk.”
  • Another might comment, “He struts around like he owns the place.”

19. Stroll

This term refers to a slow and relaxed way of walking, often with no particular destination or purpose.

  • For instance, “They took a leisurely stroll along the beach.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s go for a stroll in the park.”
  • Another might comment, “She enjoys a peaceful stroll through the neighborhood.”

20. Sashay

This slang term describes a confident and showy way of walking or moving, often with an exaggerated sway of the hips.

  • For example, “She sashayed onto the dance floor, commanding attention.”
  • A person might say, “He loves to sashay down the runway during fashion shows.”
  • Another might comment, “They sashayed through the crowd, leaving a lasting impression.”

21. Groove

Groove refers to dancing or moving in a rhythmic and smooth manner. It is often used to describe someone who is in sync with the music and moving effortlessly.

  • For example, “She really knows how to groove on the dance floor.”
  • In a conversation about dance styles, someone might say, “I love watching people groove to funk music.”
  • A person describing a party might say, “The DJ was playing some great tunes and everyone was grooving.”

22. Boogie down

Boogie down means to dance with energy and enthusiasm. It is often used to encourage others to let loose and have a good time on the dance floor.

  • For instance, “Come on, let’s boogie down and have some fun!”
  • At a wedding reception, a DJ might say, “It’s time to boogie down and celebrate the newlyweds.”
  • A person describing a concert might say, “The crowd was boogieing down to the music all night long.”

23. Cut a rug

Cut a rug means to dance, especially in a lively and energetic manner. It is a playful phrase often used to describe someone who is really enjoying themselves on the dance floor.

  • For example, “She really knows how to cut a rug at parties.”
  • In a conversation about dance moves, someone might say, “Watch me cut a rug with my fancy footwork.”
  • A person describing a dance competition might say, “The contestants were cutting rugs and impressing the judges.”

24. Get down

Get down means to dance with enthusiasm and energy. It is a phrase often used to encourage others to join in and have a good time on the dance floor.

  • For instance, “Come on, get down and show off your moves!”
  • At a music festival, a performer might say, “I want to see everyone getting down to this song.”
  • A person describing a party might say, “The DJ played some great music and everyone was getting down.”

25. Wiggle

Wiggle means to move or shake with small, quick movements. It is often used to describe playful or lighthearted movements.

  • For example, “The toddler wiggled with excitement when she saw the puppy.”
  • In a conversation about dancing, someone might say, “I love to wiggle my hips to the beat.”
  • A person describing a funny video might say, “The dog wiggled its tail and made everyone laugh.”

26. Shimmy

A shimmy is a quick, side-to-side movement of the body, often involving the shoulders or hips. It is typically done in a playful or flirtatious manner.

  • For example, a dancer might perform a shimmy as part of a routine.
  • In a social setting, someone might say, “She’s got great moves, especially her shimmy.”
  • A person describing a party might say, “The dance floor was full of people doing the shimmy.”

27. Skip

Skipping is a form of locomotion where a person moves by hopping on one foot and then the other. It is often associated with a light-hearted, carefree attitude.

  • For instance, a child might skip down the street while holding their parent’s hand.
  • In a conversation about exercise, someone might say, “Skipping is a great way to get your heart rate up.”
  • A person reminiscing about their childhood might say, “I used to skip everywhere when I was a kid.”

28. Gallop

A gallop is a fast running gait in which the horse or runner moves with a two-beat rhythm. It is often associated with horses, but can also be used to describe a similar running motion in humans.

  • For example, a horse race commentator might say, “The horse is galloping towards the finish line.”
  • In a conversation about different running styles, someone might say, “She has a unique gallop when she runs.”
  • A person describing a playful race might say, “We had a galloping competition in the park.”

29. March

Marching is a style of walking where a group of people move in unison, typically with a regular and deliberate step. It is often associated with military drills or parades.

  • For instance, a soldier might march in a military parade.
  • In a conversation about discipline, someone might say, “Marching in formation requires precision and coordination.”
  • A person describing a protest might say, “The crowd marched through the streets, chanting slogans.”

30. Glide

To glide is to move smoothly and effortlessly, usually in a continuous motion. It can refer to movement on a slippery surface, such as ice or water, or a graceful movement in the air.

  • For example, an ice skater might glide across the rink.
  • In a conversation about dance, someone might say, “She glides across the stage with such grace.”
  • A person describing a bird’s flight might say, “The eagle glided through the sky, hardly flapping its wings.”

31. Sway

To move or swing gently back and forth or from side to side. The term “sway” often connotes a smooth and graceful movement.

  • For example, “She swayed her hips to the music at the party.”
  • A person might say, “The trees swayed in the breeze.”
  • In a dance competition, a judge might comment, “Her sway was captivating and added elegance to her performance.”

32. Hurdle

To jump over or overcome a barrier or obstacle. The term “hurdle” is often used metaphorically to describe overcoming challenges or difficulties.

  • For instance, “He successfully hurdled over the fence to escape.”
  • In a motivational speech, a speaker might say, “Don’t let obstacles hinder your progress; hurdle over them.”
  • A coach might encourage their team, saying, “We can overcome this challenge; let’s hurdle over it together.”

33. Prance

To walk or move with exaggerated or playful steps, often with an air of confidence or arrogance. The term “prance” is often associated with horses or dancers.

  • For example, “The horse pranced around the field, showing off its agility.”
  • A person might say, “She pranced into the room, commanding everyone’s attention.”
  • In a ballet performance, a dancer might prance across the stage, showcasing their technique and grace.
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34. Boogie

To dance energetically, especially to popular or upbeat music. The term “boogie” is often associated with lively and spirited movements.

  • For instance, “They boogied all night long at the disco party.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s hit the dance floor and boogie!”
  • In a music video, the performers might boogie to the catchy rhythm of the song.

35. Tiptoe

To walk quietly and carefully on the tips of one’s toes, usually to avoid making noise or to maintain balance. The term “tiptoe” is often associated with stealth or caution.

  • For example, “She tiptoed into the room to surprise her friend.”
  • A person might say, “Be careful and tiptoe around the sleeping baby.”
  • In a game of hide-and-seek, a player might tiptoe to avoid giving away their hiding spot.

36. Lunge

A lunge is a movement where you take a quick step forward, typically with one leg, while keeping the other leg in place. It is often used in sports and fitness activities to target specific muscles or improve agility.

  • For example, in a fitness class, the instructor might say, “Do a lunge with your right leg forward and then switch to the left.”
  • A personal trainer might demonstrate a lunge and say, “Make sure your knee doesn’t go past your toes.”
  • In a dance routine, a choreographer might include lunges to add dynamic movement.

37. Slide

To slide means to move smoothly and effortlessly along a surface. It can refer to physical movement or metaphorical actions or transitions.

  • For instance, a child might slide down a playground slide.
  • In a baseball game, a player might slide into a base to avoid being tagged out.
  • In a presentation, a speaker might include a slide to visually display information.
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38. Twirl

To twirl is to spin or rotate quickly, often in a playful or graceful manner.

  • For example, a ballerina might twirl on her toes during a performance.
  • A child playing with a toy may twirl it around in their hands.
  • In a dance class, the instructor might teach students how to twirl elegantly.

39. Leap

A leap is a large, forceful jump or spring forward, often with both feet leaving the ground simultaneously.

  • For instance, a gymnast might perform a high leap during a routine.
  • In a ballet performance, dancers might execute graceful leaps across the stage.
  • A basketball player might leap to make a dunk.

40. Crawl

To crawl is to move on hands and knees, typically with the body close to the ground.

  • For example, a baby learning to walk might first crawl to explore their environment.
  • In military training, soldiers might crawl on their stomachs to move stealthily.
  • A person participating in a mud run might have to crawl through an obstacle.

41. Roll

This slang term is often used to indicate leaving or departing from a place or situation.

  • For example, “I’m going to roll out of here, it’s getting late.”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “Let’s roll to the party together.”
  • A person might use this slang to express frustration and say, “I can’t stand this place anymore, I need to roll.”