Top 45 Slang For Moving – Meaning & Usage

Moving to a new place can be both exciting and overwhelming. From packing up your belongings to settling into your new abode, there’s a lot to navigate. But fear not, we’ve got you covered with a list of the trendiest and most useful slang terms for moving. Whether you’re a seasoned mover or a first-timer, this list will have you speaking the language of movers in no time. So, grab a box, pack your curiosity, and let’s dive into the world of moving slang together!

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1. Bounce

This slang term means to leave a place quickly or abruptly. It is often used to indicate a swift departure or exit from a location.

  • For example, “I need to bounce from this party, it’s getting too crowded.”
  • In a conversation about leaving work early, someone might say, “I’m going to bounce at 4 pm today.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you ready to bounce? We don’t want to be late for the movie.”

2. Dip

To “dip” means to leave or depart from a place. It is a casual slang term commonly used to indicate a quick exit.

  • For instance, “I’m going to dip out of this meeting, it’s dragging on.”
  • In a discussion about ending a relationship, someone might say, “I finally decided to dip, it wasn’t working out.”
  • A person might ask, “Are you planning to dip after the party or stay longer?”

3. Skedaddle

This slang term means to hurry away or leave quickly from a location. It is often used in a playful or lighthearted manner to indicate a swift departure.

  • For example, “We need to skedaddle before the rain starts.”
  • In a conversation about avoiding a boring event, someone might say, “Let’s skedaddle before they start the speeches.”
  • A friend might suggest, “Skedaddle out of here and grab some food.”

4. Split

To “split” means to leave or go separate ways. It is a common slang term used to indicate a departure or separation from a group or situation.

  • For instance, “I’m going to split after this song, I have an early morning.”
  • In a discussion about ending a gathering, someone might say, “Let’s split and reconvene tomorrow.”
  • A person might ask, “Are you ready to split or do you want to stay a bit longer?”

5. Jet

To “jet” means to leave quickly or abruptly from a location. It is a slang term often used to indicate a swift departure or exit.

  • For example, “I need to jet, I have a meeting in 10 minutes.”
  • In a conversation about avoiding a traffic jam, someone might say, “Let’s jet before the rush hour.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you ready to jet or do you need more time?”

6. Vamoose

This slang term means to depart or leave in a hurry. It is often used to describe a swift and sudden movement from one place to another.

  • For example, “We need to vamoose before the storm hits.”
  • A person might say, “I vamoosed out of there as soon as I heard the alarm.”
  • In a movie scene, a character might yell, “Vamoose! Get out of here now!”

7. Bail

To “bail” means to leave a situation or place suddenly. It can also mean to escape from a difficult or dangerous situation.

  • For instance, “I can’t handle this party anymore, I’m bailing.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s bail before things get out of control.”
  • In a conversation about a boring event, someone might suggest, “We should bail and grab dinner instead.”

8. Hightail

To “hightail” means to leave or flee quickly. It implies a sense of urgency or haste in departing from a place or situation.

  • For example, “We need to hightail it out of here before it gets dark.”
  • A person might say, “I hightailed out of the office as soon as the clock struck 5.”
  • In a story about a close call, someone might say, “I saw the bear and hightailed in the opposite direction.”

9. Scoot

To “scoot” means to move quickly or hurry. It can refer to physically moving from one place to another or to doing something quickly.

  • For instance, “I need to scoot to catch my train.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s scoot out of here before the traffic gets worse.”
  • In a conversation about finishing a task, someone might say, “I’ll scoot through this report and have it ready for the meeting.”

10. GTFO

This slang term is an abbreviation for “Get the f*** out.” It is an emphatic and explicit way of expressing the need to leave a place immediately.

  • For example, “When the alarm went off, I yelled ‘GTFO’ and ran for the exit.”
  • A person might say, “If someone starts a fight, it’s best to GTFO and avoid the drama.”
  • In a story about a scary encounter, someone might say, “I saw something creepy and GTFO as fast as I could.”

11. Bounce out

This phrase is used to indicate leaving a place or situation abruptly or hastily. It can also imply a sense of finality or decisiveness in the departure.

  • For example, “I can’t stand this party anymore, let’s bounce out.”
  • In a conversation about a bad relationship, someone might say, “Once I realized he was cheating, I decided to bounce out.”
  • A group of friends planning a road trip might say, “We’ll bounce out early in the morning to beat the traffic.”

12. Peace out

This phrase is used to say goodbye or to indicate leaving a place or situation. It is often used in a casual or lighthearted manner.

  • For instance, “Alright, I’m done here. Peace out!”
  • When leaving a gathering, someone might say, “Thanks for having me, peace out!”
  • In a text message, someone might simply reply, “I’ll see you later, peace out.”

13. Hit the road

This phrase is used to indicate starting a journey or leaving a place. It can imply a sense of excitement or anticipation for the upcoming adventure.

  • For example, “It’s time to hit the road and explore new places.”
  • When saying goodbye to friends after a visit, someone might say, “Well, it’s time for us to hit the road. Thanks for everything!”
  • A person planning a solo trip might announce, “I’m hitting the road tomorrow and embarking on a solo adventure.”

14. Roll out

This phrase is used to indicate leaving a place or situation. It can also imply a sense of moving on or progressing to the next phase.

  • For instance, “I’ve got an early morning tomorrow, so I better roll out.”
  • When leaving a party, someone might say, “Thanks for the great time, but I need to roll out now.”
  • A person quitting a job might inform their colleagues, “I’ve decided to roll out and pursue new opportunities.”

15. Pack up

This phrase is used to indicate the act of preparing one’s belongings for moving or leaving a place. It can imply the process of gathering and organizing personal items.

  • For example, “We need to pack up our things before the movers arrive.”
  • When getting ready to leave a hotel, someone might say, “Let’s pack up and check out by noon.”
  • A person moving to a new city might tell their friends, “I’ve started packing up my apartment and saying goodbye to this chapter of my life.”

16. Hit the bricks

This phrase is used to tell someone to leave or go away. It can also mean to start moving or get going.

  • For example, “I can’t stand that guy anymore, it’s time for him to hit the bricks.”
  • In a movie, a character might say, “We better hit the bricks before it gets dark.”
  • A friend might say to another, “Come on, let’s hit the bricks and go grab some food.”

17. Make tracks

To make tracks means to leave a place quickly or in a hurry. It implies that someone is in a rush or needs to depart immediately.

  • For instance, “I had to make tracks because I was running late for work.”
  • In a situation where someone is uncomfortable, they might say, “I think it’s time to make tracks and get out of here.”
  • A friend might say, “We should make tracks before it starts raining.”

18. Cut out

To cut out means to leave a place abruptly or suddenly. It can also mean to stop doing something or end an activity.

  • For example, “I have to cut out early today because I have an appointment.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I think it’s time to cut out and head home.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to cut out of this party, it’s getting boring.”

19. Take off

To take off means to leave a place quickly or suddenly. It can also mean to start a journey or depart on a trip.

  • For instance, “I have to take off now, I have a meeting to attend.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I’m going to take off and catch my flight.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s take off early tomorrow morning and beat the traffic.”

20. Clear out

To clear out means to leave a place or vacate an area. It can also mean to remove or get rid of something.

  • For example, “We need to clear out of this room so they can set up for the next event.”
  • In a situation where someone is unwelcome, they might be told, “Clear out, we don’t want you here.”
  • A person might say, “I’m clearing out my old stuff to make space for new things.”

21. Book it

This slang phrase means to leave a place quickly or to hurry up. It is often used when someone needs to move or leave in a hurry.

  • For example, if someone is late for a meeting, they might say, “I better book it or I’ll be even later.”
  • In a dangerous situation, someone might yell, “Book it! We need to get out of here now!”
  • If a friend is waiting for you and you’re taking too long, they might say, “Come on, book it! We’re going to be late!”

22. Beat it

This slang phrase means to leave or go away. It is often used to tell someone to go away or to leave a place.

  • For instance, if someone is bothering you, you might say, “Beat it! I don’t want to talk to you.”
  • If someone is overstaying their welcome, you might say, “It’s time for you to beat it and give us some space.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might shout, “Just beat it! I don’t want to see you anymore!”

23. Scarper

This slang word means to run away or leave quickly. It is often used to describe a hasty departure from a place.

  • For example, if someone sees the police coming, they might say, “We need to scarper before they catch us.”
  • In a funny situation, someone might jokingly say, “If the boss finds out what we did, we better scarper before he fires us.”
  • If someone is caught doing something they shouldn’t, they might quickly apologize and scarper out of embarrassment.
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24. Haul ass

This slang phrase means to move quickly or to hurry up. It is often used to indicate a need for speed or urgency.

  • For instance, if someone is running late, they might say, “I need to haul ass or I’ll miss my flight.”
  • In a race, a coach might yell, “Haul ass! We need to beat the competition!”
  • If someone is taking too long to get ready, you might say, “Come on, haul ass! We’re going to be late!”

25. Bounce a check

This slang phrase means to write a bad check, which is a check that cannot be cashed because there are insufficient funds in the account.

  • For example, if someone tries to pay for something with a check and it bounces, the cashier might say, “Sorry, but you bounced a check.”
  • If someone is known for writing bad checks, you might say, “Watch out for them, they have a tendency to bounce checks.”
  • In a conversation about financial responsibility, someone might say, “It’s important to manage your finances properly and not bounce checks.”

26. Bolt

To bolt means to leave or depart quickly. It is often used when someone wants to emphasize a speedy departure.

  • For example, “I’m going to bolt before the traffic gets worse.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s bolt out of here before the party gets too crowded.”
  • In a rush to catch a flight, someone might exclaim, “I have to bolt or I’ll miss my plane!”

27. Skip town

Skipping town means to leave a place, usually with the intention of not returning. It implies leaving behind responsibilities or problems.

  • For instance, “He skipped town after he was accused of a crime.”
  • A character in a movie might say, “I had to skip town to start a new life.”
  • In a conversation about moving away, someone might say, “I’m thinking about skipping town and starting fresh.”

28. Get going

To get going means to start moving or to leave a place. It can be used in various contexts to indicate a departure or beginning of a journey.

  • For example, “It’s getting late, we should get going.”
  • In a conversation about leaving a party, someone might say, “I think it’s time to get going.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you ready to get going on our road trip?”

To head out means to leave or depart from a place. It is a casual way to indicate that someone is leaving.

  • For instance, “I have to head out early tomorrow morning.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll head out now so I can beat the traffic.”
  • In a conversation about going home, someone might say, “I think it’s time to head out.”

30. Push off

To push off means to leave or depart from a place. It can be used in a casual or slightly dismissive way to indicate that someone is leaving.

  • For example, “I should push off and get home before it gets dark.”
  • A person might say, “I pushed off from the party early because I wasn’t feeling well.”
  • In a conversation about leaving work, someone might say, “I’m going to push off a little early today.”

31. Shuffle off

This slang phrase means to leave a place without drawing attention or making a fuss. It often implies a desire to leave quickly or avoid detection.

  • For example, “After the party, we decided to shuffle off before anyone noticed.”
  • In a discussion about avoiding confrontation, someone might suggest, “If things get heated, just shuffle off and avoid the drama.”
  • A person recounting a hasty departure might say, “I had to shuffle off from my old job because of a conflict with my boss.”

32. Go on the lam

This slang phrase means to escape or disappear, often to avoid capture or legal trouble. It is commonly used to describe someone who is on the run from the law.

  • For instance, “The suspect went on the lam after the robbery.”
  • In a conversation about evading authorities, someone might say, “If you commit a crime, the last thing you want to do is go on the lam.”
  • A person sharing a thrilling story might exclaim, “I had to go on the lam for a few days after witnessing a crime!”

33. Pack up shop

This slang phrase means to gather and organize one’s belongings in preparation for leaving a place or closing down a business. It implies a process of packing and securing items before moving or shutting down.

  • For example, “After years of running the store, it’s time to pack up shop and retire.”
  • In a discussion about changing locations, someone might say, “We’re packing up shop and moving to a new city.”
  • A person sharing their experience of closing a business might say, “It was emotional to pack up shop after all those years of hard work.”

34. Pull up stakes

This slang phrase means to leave a place or location, often with the intention of starting fresh elsewhere. It refers to the act of uprooting or removing stakes that were used to secure something in place.

  • For instance, “They decided to pull up stakes and move to the countryside.”
  • In a conversation about making a major life change, someone might say, “I’m ready to pull up stakes and start over in a new city.”
  • A person sharing their plans for the future might say, “I’ve saved enough money to pull up stakes and travel the world.”

35. Hightail it

This slang phrase means to leave a place in a hurry or with great speed. It implies a sense of urgency or the desire to escape a situation.

  • For example, “When they saw the police approaching, they hightailed it out of there.”
  • In a discussion about avoiding trouble, someone might advise, “If you find yourself in a dangerous situation, hightail it to safety.”
  • A person sharing a thrilling story might exclaim, “We had to hightail it through the woods to escape from a wild animal!”

36. Bug out

To bug out means to leave a place quickly or abruptly, especially in a situation where one feels threatened or in danger.

  • For example, “When the storm hit, we had to bug out of our camping trip.”
  • In a military context, a soldier might be ordered to “bug out” of a dangerous area.
  • A person might say, “I didn’t feel safe in that neighborhood, so I decided to bug out.”

37. Cut and run

To cut and run means to leave a situation or place hastily and without taking responsibility for the consequences.

  • For instance, “When the police arrived, the thieves decided to cut and run.”
  • In a business context, a company might cut and run from a failing project.
  • A person might say, “I knew I was in trouble, so I cut and run before anyone could catch me.”

38. Decamp

To decamp means to leave a place suddenly or secretly, often to escape from a difficult or dangerous situation.

  • For example, “The spies decided to decamp from their hideout before they were discovered.”
  • In a camping context, a person might decamp from one campsite to another.
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t stand living with my roommates anymore, so I decided to decamp.”

39. Hotfoot it

To hotfoot it means to leave quickly or hurry up, often with a sense of urgency or excitement.

  • For instance, “We heard the ice cream truck coming, so we hotfooted it to get there before it left.”
  • In a race or competition, a runner might hotfoot it to the finish line.
  • A person might say, “I realized I was running late, so I hotfooted it to the meeting.”

40. Abscond

To abscond means to leave hurriedly and secretly, often to avoid detection or punishment.

  • For example, “The suspect managed to abscond from the police station while they were distracted.”
  • In a financial context, a person might abscond with money from a company.
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t handle the pressure anymore, so I decided to abscond from my responsibilities.”

41. Dash

To dash means to leave or move quickly. It is often used to describe a sudden departure or escape.

  • For example, “I need to dash to catch my train.”
  • Someone might say, “Let’s dash out of here before it starts raining.”
  • In a movie, a character might shout, “Quick, let’s dash before they see us!”

42. Split the scene

To split the scene means to leave a place or location. It implies a swift and sudden departure.

  • For instance, “I think it’s time to split the scene and find somewhere else to hang out.”
  • Someone might say, “Let’s split the scene before things get too crowded.”
  • In a conversation about a party, a person might mention, “We decided to split the scene early because it was getting boring.”

43. Absquatulate

Absquatulate means to leave or depart abruptly or in a hurry. It is a more humorous and whimsical term for moving or leaving.

  • For example, “I think it’s time to absquatulate from this party.”
  • Someone might say, “Let’s absquatulate before we get caught.”
  • In a playful conversation, a person might suggest, “We should absquatulate to a tropical island and leave all our worries behind!”

44. Clear off

To clear off means to go away or leave a place. It is often used in a more dismissive or annoyed tone.

  • For instance, “Why don’t you clear off and leave me alone?”
  • Someone might say, “I told him to clear off after he kept bothering me.”
  • In a conversation about an unwanted guest, a person might say, “I had to tell them to clear off because they were overstaying their welcome.”

45. Make a break for it

To make a break for it means to escape or flee from a situation or location. It implies a sudden and determined movement.

  • For example, “When the alarm went off, we knew it was time to make a break for it.”
  • Someone might say, “Let’s make a break for it before they catch up to us.”
  • In a story, a character might decide to make a break for it when they realize they are in danger.
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