Top 12 Slang For Nervous – Meaning & Usage

Feeling jittery, anxious, or on edge? We’ve got you covered with a list of slang terms that perfectly capture that nervous energy. Whether you’re a bundle of nerves before a big presentation or just feeling a bit jittery, our team has compiled the top words to help you express those feelings in style. Dive in and discover the perfect slang to convey your inner butterflies!

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1. Anxious

This term describes a feeling of unease or worry. It is often used to describe a state of nervousness or apprehension.

  • For example, “I’m feeling anxious about my upcoming presentation.”
  • A person might say, “I always get anxious before a job interview.”
  • Another might express, “I feel anxious when I have to speak in front of a large crowd.”

2. Jittery

Jittery refers to a state of nervousness or restlessness, often accompanied by shaky movements or jitters.

  • For instance, “I’m feeling jittery before my first day of school.”
  • A person might say, “I always get jittery before a big performance.”
  • Another might express, “I feel jittery when I have to make an important decision.”

3. On edge

This phrase describes a feeling of being nervous, tense, or easily agitated. It implies a sense of being on the edge of one’s emotions or reactions.

  • For example, “I’ve been on edge ever since I heard the news.”
  • A person might say, “I feel on edge when I’m in crowded places.”
  • Another might express, “I always feel on edge before a job interview.”

4. Fidgety

Fidgety describes a state of restlessness or the inability to sit still. It often indicates nervousness or anxiety.

  • For instance, “I always get fidgety when I’m waiting for important news.”
  • A person might say, “I feel fidgety when I have to sit through a long meeting.”
  • Another might express, “I get fidgety when I’m in unfamiliar surroundings.”

5. Twitchy

Twitchy refers to a state of being nervous or jumpy, often characterized by sudden, involuntary movements or twitches.

  • For example, “I get twitchy when I’m in crowded places.”
  • A person might say, “I feel twitchy before a big event.”
  • Another might express, “I always get twitchy when I have to speak in public.”

6. Uneasy

This term describes a feeling of discomfort or unease, often due to a specific situation or circumstance.

  • For example, “I felt uneasy walking alone in the dark.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m feeling a bit uneasy about the upcoming presentation.”
  • A person might describe their uneasiness by saying, “I have this uneasy feeling in the pit of my stomach.”

7. High-strung

This term refers to someone who is easily stressed or prone to anxiety. It implies a heightened state of tension or nervousness.

  • For instance, “She’s always been a high-strung person, even as a child.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t handle high-strung people, they stress me out.”
  • A person might describe themselves as high-strung by saying, “I’m naturally high-strung, so I have to work on managing my stress.”

8. Panicky

This term describes a state of intense fear or anxiety, often accompanied by a sense of urgency or the need to escape a situation.

  • For example, “I started to feel panicky when I realized I was lost.”
  • Someone might say, “Don’t panic, we’ll figure this out.”
  • A person might describe their panicky state by saying, “I had a panicky feeling in my chest, like everything was closing in on me.”

9. Shaky

This term describes a physical symptom of nervousness or anxiety, where a person’s body or limbs tremble or shake involuntarily.

  • For instance, “Her voice was shaky as she delivered the presentation.”
  • Someone might say, “I get shaky whenever I have to speak in public.”
  • A person might describe their shaky state by saying, “I couldn’t control my shaky hands, even though I tried to calm myself.”

10. Wound up

This term describes a state of being tightly wound or wound up, where a person feels on edge or unable to relax.

  • For example, “I couldn’t sleep last night, I was too wound up about the big test.”
  • Someone might say, “She’s always wound up, I don’t know how she handles the stress.”
  • A person might describe themselves as wound up by saying, “I’ve been feeling really wound up lately, I need to find ways to relax.”

11. Agitated

Agitated is a term used to describe someone who is feeling stressed or anxious. It can also refer to a state of restlessness or irritability.

  • For example, “She was agitated before her big presentation.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling really agitated about the upcoming exam.”
  • Another might describe their state as, “I’ve been feeling agitated all day, I can’t seem to relax.”

12. Edgy

Edgy is a slang term used to describe someone who is feeling nervous or on edge. It can also refer to a person who is easily irritated or prone to anger.

  • For instance, “He’s been acting really edgy lately, I think something is bothering him.”
  • A person might say, “I always get edgy before a big interview.”
  • Another might describe their state as, “I feel so edgy whenever I have to speak in public.”
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