Top 80 Slang For Never – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to slang, staying up-to-date is key. “Slang for Never” may seem like a paradox, but trust us, there’s a whole world of trendy phrases out there that you may have never heard of. Let us take you on a linguistic journey as we uncover the most current and hip slang terms for expressing the concept of never. Get ready to impress your friends with your newfound knowledge!

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1. Nada

This term is used to indicate the absence or lack of something. It is often used to express the idea of “never” or “not at all”.

  • For example, if someone asks if you’ve ever been to Paris, you might respond, “Nada, I’ve never been.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s accomplishments, you might say, “He started with nada and built a successful business.”
  • If someone offers you a piece of cake and you don’t want any, you might decline by saying, “Nada for me, thanks.”

2. Zilch

This term is another way to say “nothing” or “none at all”. It is often used to emphasize the absence or lack of something.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you have any plans for the weekend, you might respond, “Zilch, I have no plans.”
  • In a discussion about a disappointing outcome, you might say, “We put in a lot of effort, but got zilch in return.”
  • If someone asks if you’ve seen the latest movie, you might reply, “Zilch, I haven’t had the chance to go to the theater.”

3. Nil

This term is derived from the Latin word “nihil” and is used as a synonym for “zero” or “nothing”. It is often used in sports to indicate a score of zero, but can also be used in everyday language to express the idea of “never”.

  • For example, in a soccer match, if a team fails to score any goals, their score might be referred to as “nil”.
  • In a conversation about someone’s chances of success, you might say, “His chances are nil, he has no experience in that field.”
  • If someone asks if you’ve ever been skydiving, you might respond, “Nil, I’ve never had the opportunity.”

4. Zip

This term is used to indicate the absence or lack of something. It is often used in a casual or informal context to express the idea of “never” or “not at all”.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you have any siblings, you might respond, “Zip, I’m an only child.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s knowledge on a particular subject, you might say, “He knows zip about cars.”
  • If someone asks if you’ve ever tried sushi, you might reply, “Zip, I’m not a fan of raw fish.”

5. Nix

This term is used to indicate a negative response or to reject something. It is often used in a casual or informal context to express the idea of “never” or “not at all”.

  • For example, if someone asks if you want another slice of pizza, you might respond, “Nix, I’m full.”
  • In a discussion about a proposed plan, you might say, “I nixed the idea because it wasn’t feasible.”
  • If someone asks if you’ve ever been to Australia, you might reply, “Nix, but it’s on my bucket list.”

6. Goose egg

This term is often used to describe a score of zero in sports or games. It can also be used to refer to having nothing or achieving nothing in a general sense.

  • For example, in a baseball game, a commentator might say, “The home team has a goose egg on the scoreboard.”
  • A person discussing their lack of success might say, “I’ve got goose egg to show for all my hard work.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s performance, one might say, “They came up with goose egg in the final round.”

7. Diddly-squat

This term is used to emphasize that there is absolutely nothing or a complete lack of something.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I don’t know diddly-squat about cars.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s contribution, one might say, “They diddly-squat to help with the project.”
  • A person expressing their disappointment might say, “I’ve been waiting for hours and got diddly-squat in return.”

8. Jack

This term is often used to indicate a lack or absence of something.

  • For example, a person might say, “I have jack to do this weekend.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s possessions, one might say, “They’ve got jack in their bank account.”
  • A person expressing their frustration might say, “They did jack to fix the problem.”

9. Squat

This term is used to indicate a lack or insignificance of something.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’ve done squat to prepare for the exam.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s contribution, one might say, “They’ve contributed squat to the project.”
  • A person expressing their disappointment might say, “I’ve been waiting for hours and got squat in return.”

10. Nought

This term is often used to refer to the number zero or a complete lack of something.

  • For example, a person might say, “I have nought to wear for the party.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s achievements, one might say, “They’ve accomplished nought in their career.”
  • A person expressing their frustration might say, “All my efforts resulted in nought.”

11. Nary

This word is used to indicate the absence or lack of something. It is often used to emphasize the complete absence or nonexistence of something.

  • For example, “I’ve nary a clue what you’re talking about.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s cooking skills, one might say, “She has nary a talent in the kitchen.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I’ve searched high and low, but there’s nary a sign of my lost keys.”

12. Not a chance

This phrase is used to express strong disbelief or certainty that something will not happen or is impossible.

  • For instance, “You think I’m going to lend you money? Not a chance!”
  • In a discussion about winning the lottery, one might say, “The odds are so low, not a chance I’ll win.”
  • A person might declare, “I’m not a morning person, so waking up early? Not a chance.”

13. Not in a million years

This phrase is used to emphasize that something will never happen, even in an extremely unlikely scenario.

  • For example, “You think I’ll forgive you for what you did? Not in a million years.”
  • In a conversation about someone being late, one might say, “They’ll never arrive on time, not in a million years.”
  • A person might declare, “I would never move to a big city, not in a million years.”

14. Not on your life

This phrase is used to express strong refusal or disagreement with something.

  • For instance, “Will I lend you my car? Not on your life!”
  • In a discussion about taking risks, one might say, “I would never bungee jump, not on your life.”
  • A person might declare, “I won’t eat that spicy food, not on your life.”

15. Not in a million Sundays

This phrase is used to emphasize that something will never happen, even in an extremely unlikely or distant future.

  • For example, “You think I’ll go skydiving? Not in a million Sundays.”
  • In a conversation about someone changing their mind, one might say, “They won’t change, not in a million Sundays.”
  • A person might declare, “I won’t wear that outfit, not in a million Sundays.”

16. Not for all the tea in China

This phrase is used to emphasize that something will never happen, no matter the circumstances. It suggests that the person would not do the action even if offered a large amount of tea from China.

  • For example, if someone asks you to go skydiving, you might respond, “Not for all the tea in China!”
  • In a discussion about taking risks, someone might say, “I would never bungee jump, not for all the tea in China.”
  • If a friend suggests trying a new food that you strongly dislike, you might say, “I wouldn’t eat that, not for all the tea in China!”

17. Not for all the money in the world

This expression is used to convey that something will never happen, regardless of the amount of money offered. It implies that the person would not do the action even if given all the money in the world.

  • For instance, if someone asks you to swim with sharks, you might respond, “Not for all the money in the world!”
  • In a conversation about facing fears, someone might say, “I would never go bungee jumping, not for all the money in the world.”
  • If a friend suggests trying a food that you find repulsive, you might say, “I wouldn’t eat that, not for all the money in the world!”

18. Not for love nor money

This phrase is used to indicate that something will never happen, regardless of the efforts made or the incentives offered. It suggests that the person would not do the action for any reason.

  • For example, if someone asks you to go on a roller coaster, you might respond, “Not for love nor money!”
  • In a discussion about trying new experiences, someone might say, “I would never try bungee jumping, not for love nor money.”
  • If a friend suggests watching a movie that you have no interest in, you might say, “I wouldn’t watch that, not for love nor money!”

19. Not for all the gold in Fort Knox

This expression is used to emphasize that something will never happen, even if offered a vast amount of wealth. It implies that the person would not do the action under any circumstances.

  • For instance, if someone asks you to eat a live insect, you might respond, “Not for all the gold in Fort Knox!”
  • In a conversation about taking risks, someone might say, “I would never go bungee jumping, not for all the gold in Fort Knox.”
  • If a friend suggests going on a trip to a place you have no interest in, you might say, “I wouldn’t go there, not for all the gold in Fort Knox!”

20. Not for all the stars in the sky

This phrase is used to convey that something will never happen, no matter how many stars are offered. It suggests that the person would not do the action for any reason.

  • For example, if someone asks you to sing in front of a large crowd, you might respond, “Not for all the stars in the sky!”
  • In a discussion about facing fears, someone might say, “I would never go bungee jumping, not for all the stars in the sky.”
  • If a friend suggests trying a food that you find disgusting, you might say, “I wouldn’t eat that, not for all the stars in the sky!”

21. Not for all the water in the ocean

This phrase is used to express a strong refusal or denial. It emphasizes that the speaker would never do or agree to something, even if the conditions were extremely favorable or tempting.

  • For example, if someone asks you to betray a friend, you might respond, “Not for all the water in the ocean.”
  • In a discussion about compromising one’s values, someone might say, “I would never lie, not for all the water in the ocean.”
  • If someone suggests doing something unethical or immoral, you could reply, “That’s not something I would ever consider, not for all the water in the ocean.”

22. Not for all the diamonds in Africa

This phrase is used to express a firm refusal or unwillingness to do something, regardless of the potential rewards or benefits. It emphasizes that the speaker values their principles or priorities more than any material gain.

  • For instance, if someone asks you to cheat on a test, you might say, “Not for all the diamonds in Africa.”
  • In a conversation about compromising one’s integrity, someone might declare, “I would never betray my values, not for all the diamonds in Africa.”
  • If someone suggests engaging in illegal activities, you could respond, “I have too much respect for the law to do that, not for all the diamonds in Africa.”

23. Not for all the power in the world

This phrase is used to express a strong refusal or rejection. It signifies that the speaker will never agree to or engage in something, even if offered or given immense power or authority.

  • For example, if someone asks you to abuse your position of power, you might respond, “Not for all the power in the world.”
  • In a discussion about compromising one’s ethics, someone might assert, “I would never compromise my principles, not for all the power in the world.”
  • If someone suggests doing something morally wrong or unethical, you could reply, “I value my integrity too much to do that, not for all the power in the world.”

24. Not for all the riches in the world

This phrase is used to express a firm refusal or unwillingness to do something, regardless of the potential wealth or material possessions that may be offered. It emphasizes that the speaker values their principles or priorities more than any amount of money or riches.

  • For instance, if someone asks you to betray a loved one for financial gain, you might say, “Not for all the riches in the world.”
  • In a conversation about compromising one’s values, someone might declare, “I would never sell out my beliefs, not for all the riches in the world.”
  • If someone suggests engaging in illegal activities for monetary gain, you could respond, “I have too much respect for the law to do that, not for all the riches in the world.”

25. Zero

This word is used to indicate the absence or lack of something. It can be used to emphasize that there is absolutely none of a particular thing or that something will never happen.

  • For example, if someone asks if you have any interest in a particular activity, you might respond, “Zero interest.”
  • In a conversation about the likelihood of something occurring, someone might say, “There’s zero chance of that happening.”
  • If someone suggests a possibility that you find completely unlikely, you could reply, “I have zero belief in that.”

26. Not a sausage

This phrase is used to indicate that there is no chance or possibility of something happening. It emphasizes the complete absence or lack of something.

  • For example, if someone asks if there are any available tickets to a sold-out concert, you might respond, “Not a sausage, I’m afraid.”
  • In a discussion about finding a job in a tough economy, someone might say, “I’ve been applying for months, but I’ve gotten not a sausage in response.”
  • If someone asks if you have any experience with a particular skill, you might reply, “Not a sausage, I’m afraid. I’m completely new to it.”

27. Not in a month of Sundays

This phrase is used to express extreme doubt or disbelief about the possibility of something happening. It suggests that the chances of the event occurring are extremely low.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you would ever consider skydiving, you might respond, “Not in a month of Sundays. I’m terrified of heights.”
  • In a discussion about winning the lottery, someone might say, “The odds are so slim, I have a better chance of getting struck by lightning. Not in a month of Sundays.”
  • If someone asks if you would ever betray a close friend, you might reply, “Not in a month of Sundays. Loyalty is important to me.”

28. Not in this lifetime

This phrase is used to express strong certainty that something will never happen, usually due to personal preference or conviction.

  • For example, if someone asks if you would ever try a particular food that you dislike, you might respond, “Not in this lifetime. I can’t stand the taste.”
  • In a discussion about forgiving someone who has deeply hurt you, you might say, “Not in this lifetime. They crossed a line I can’t forgive.”
  • If someone asks if you would ever consider moving to a different country, you might reply, “Not in this lifetime. I love my home country too much.”

29. Not on your nelly

This phrase is used to emphatically reject or refuse a suggestion or request. It is a playful and humorous way of expressing a strong negative response.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you would be willing to jump into a freezing cold lake, you might respond, “Not on your nelly! I hate cold water.”
  • In a discussion about trying a new extreme sport, you might say, “Not on your nelly. I’m not a fan of heights.”
  • If someone asks if you would ever wear a particular fashion trend, you might reply, “Not on your nelly. It’s just not my style.”

30. Not for all the diamonds in the world

This phrase is used to express a strong refusal or rejection of something, emphasizing that no amount of material wealth or possessions would change the decision.

  • For example, if someone asks if you would betray a loved one for personal gain, you might respond, “Not for all the diamonds in the world. My loyalty is priceless.”
  • In a discussion about compromising one’s principles for success, someone might say, “Not for all the diamonds in the world. My integrity is worth more.”
  • If someone asks if you would give up your dreams for financial security, you might reply, “Not for all the diamonds in the world. My dreams are priceless.”

31. Not for all the oil in the Middle East

This phrase emphasizes that something will never happen or be done, even if offered a significant reward or incentive. It implies that the person is unwilling to do something under any circumstances.

  • For example, if someone asks you to betray your closest friend, you might respond, “Not for all the oil in the Middle East.”
  • In a discussion about taking risks, someone might say, “I would never go bungee jumping, not for all the oil in the Middle East.”
  • A person might declare, “I would never give up my principles, not for all the oil in the Middle East.”

32. Naught

This word is an old-fashioned way of saying “nothing” or “zero.” It is often used to emphasize the absence or lack of something.

  • For instance, if someone asks you what you found in the abandoned house, you might respond, “Naught. There was nothing there.”
  • In a conversation about a failed business venture, one might say, “All our efforts amounted to naught.”
  • A person might express disappointment by stating, “Our team scored naught in the game.”

33. Nary a one

This phrase means “not even one” or “none at all.” It is often used to emphasize the absence or complete lack of something.

  • For example, if someone asks if you saw any dolphins during your beach trip, you might reply, “Nary a one. We didn’t see any.”
  • In a discussion about finding the right job, someone might say, “I’ve applied to many positions, but nary a one has called me back.”
  • A person might express frustration by stating, “I’ve been searching for my keys for hours, but nary a one can be found.”

34. Not a bean

This phrase means “not even a small amount” or “absolutely nothing.” It is often used to emphasize the complete absence or lack of something.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you have any spare change, you might respond, “Not a bean. I don’t have any.”
  • In a conversation about a failed investment, one might say, “I put all my money into that stock, and now I have not a bean left.”
  • A person might express disappointment by stating, “I’ve been trying to sell my old clothes, but I’ve had not a bean of interest.”

35. Not a jot

This phrase means “not even a small amount” or “not at all.” It is often used to emphasize the complete absence or lack of something.

  • For example, if someone asks if you understood the complicated math problem, you might reply, “Not a jot. I didn’t understand any of it.”
  • In a discussion about a failed attempt at learning a new language, someone might say, “I studied for months, but I can’t speak a word. I’ve made not a jot of progress.”
  • A person might express frustration by stating, “I’ve been trying to fix my computer, but it’s not responding, not a jot.”

36. Not a whit

This phrase is used to emphasize that something will never happen or is completely nonexistent. It is often used in a negative context.

  • For example, “I will not apologize, not a whit!”
  • In a discussion about a difficult task, someone might say, “I have not a whit of motivation to get it done.”
  • Another person might express their disbelief by saying, “I have not a whit of faith in his promises.”

37. Not a scrap

This phrase is used to indicate that there is absolutely nothing of something. It is often used to emphasize that there is no amount or trace of something.

  • For instance, “There is not a scrap of evidence to support his claim.”
  • In a conversation about leftovers, someone might say, “I ate everything, there’s not a scrap left.”
  • Another person might declare, “I have not a scrap of patience for his excuses.”

38. Not a dicky bird

This phrase is used to indicate that there is no information or news about something. It is often used in a casual or colloquial context.

  • For example, “I have not heard a dicky bird about the project.”
  • In a discussion about a missing person, someone might say, “There’s not a dicky bird about their whereabouts.”
  • Another person might express their frustration by saying, “I asked around, but not a dicky bird knows what’s going on.”

39. Not a red cent

This phrase is used to emphasize that someone has absolutely no money. It is often used in a financial or monetary context.

  • For instance, “After the accident, I was left with not a red cent.”
  • In a discussion about a failed business venture, someone might say, “They invested everything and ended up with not a red cent.”
  • Another person might express their financial struggle by saying, “I’ve been unemployed for months and have not a red cent to my name.”

40. Not a shred

This phrase is used to indicate that there is absolutely none of something. It is often used to emphasize the complete absence or lack of something.

  • For example, “She has not a shred of compassion for others.”
  • In a conversation about a missing item, someone might say, “I’ve searched everywhere, but there’s not a shred of evidence.”
  • Another person might express their disappointment by saying, “I have not a shred of patience left for his constant excuses.”

41. Not a speck

This phrase is used to emphasize that there is absolutely no amount or trace of something. It is often used to express complete absence or negation.

  • For example, “I don’t have a speck of talent in singing.”
  • A person might say, “There’s not a speck of truth in that rumor.”
  • Another might declare, “I won’t give you a speck of my time.”

42. Not a smidgen

This phrase is similar to “not a speck” and is used to emphasize the complete absence or lack of something. It is often used to indicate that there is no amount or trace of something, even in small quantities.

  • For instance, “I didn’t have a smidgen of interest in that movie.”
  • A person might say, “There’s not a smidgen of evidence to support that claim.”
  • Another might declare, “I won’t give you a smidgen of my attention.”

43. Not a lick

This phrase is used to emphasize the complete absence or lack of something. It is often used to indicate that there is no amount or trace of something, even in small quantities.

  • For example, “I didn’t do a lick of work today.”
  • A person might say, “There’s not a lick of sense in what you’re saying.”
  • Another might declare, “I won’t give you a lick of my time.”

44. Not a tittle

This phrase is used to emphasize the complete absence or lack of something. It is often used to indicate that there is no amount or trace of something, even in small quantities.

  • For instance, “I didn’t change a tittle of my plans.”
  • A person might say, “There’s not a tittle of truth in that statement.”
  • Another might declare, “I won’t give you a tittle of my attention.”

45. Not a sou

This phrase is used to emphasize that there is absolutely no amount or trace of money. It is often used to express complete absence or negation of financial resources.

  • For example, “I don’t have a sou to my name.”
  • A person might say, “There’s not a sou left in my wallet.”
  • Another might declare, “I won’t give you a sou of my hard-earned money.”

46. Not a farthing

This phrase is an old-fashioned way of saying that someone has no money or possessions. It emphasizes a complete lack of financial resources.

  • For example, “After losing his job, he was left with not a farthing to his name.”
  • In a discussion about financial struggles, someone might say, “I’ve been living on ramen noodles for weeks – not a farthing left.”
  • Another person might comment, “She inherited a fortune, so she’ll never know what it’s like to have not a farthing.”

47. Not a brass farthing

Similar to “not a farthing,” this phrase also means that someone has no money or possessions. The addition of “brass” emphasizes the lack of value or worth.

  • For instance, “He gambled away his entire savings and was left with not a brass farthing.”
  • In a conversation about financial struggles, someone might say, “I can’t afford to go out tonight – not a brass farthing in my pocket.”
  • Another person might comment, “She wasted all her money on luxury items and now has not a brass farthing to show for it.”

48. Not a penny to one’s name

This phrase is a more modern way of expressing that someone has no money or possessions. It emphasizes a complete lack of financial resources.

  • For example, “After losing his job, he was left with not a penny to his name.”
  • In a discussion about financial struggles, someone might say, “I’ve been living paycheck to paycheck – not a penny to my name.”
  • Another person might comment, “She’s always been financially irresponsible, so it’s no surprise she has not a penny to her name.”

49. Not a jot nor tittle

This phrase is used to emphasize that there is absolutely nothing of something. It is often used in a figurative sense.

  • For instance, “He didn’t understand a jot nor tittle of the complicated instructions.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s knowledge, one might say, “He claimed to be an expert, but he knows not a jot nor tittle about the subject.”
  • Another person might comment, “I’ve searched high and low, but there’s not a jot nor tittle of evidence to support his claims.”

50. Not a whit nor a hair

Similar to “not a jot nor tittle,” this phrase is used to emphasize that there is absolutely nothing of something. It can be used in both literal and figurative contexts.

  • For example, “She didn’t have a whit nor a hair of evidence to support her accusation.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s belongings, one might say, “He packed up and left, taking not a whit nor a hair of his possessions.”
  • Another person might comment, “I’ve searched every corner, but there’s not a whit nor a hair of the missing item.”

51. Not a jot nor a tittle

This phrase is used to emphasize that something will never happen or is completely nonexistent. It is derived from the biblical phrase “not a jot or a tittle,” which refers to the smallest details or marks in writing.

  • For example, “I will never forgive him, not a jot nor a tittle.”
  • In a discussion about the likelihood of a certain outcome, someone might say, “There’s not a jot nor a tittle of a chance that will happen.”
  • A person might express their lack of interest in a particular activity by saying, “I have not a jot nor a tittle of desire to do that.”

52. Not a whit nor a tittle

This phrase is similar in meaning to “not a jot nor a tittle” and is used to emphasize that something will never happen or is completely nonexistent. The term “whit” refers to a small amount or degree.

  • For instance, “I have not a whit nor a tittle of interest in that topic.”
  • In a discussion about the likelihood of success, someone might say, “There’s not a whit nor a tittle of a chance we’ll win.”
  • A person might express their lack of belief in a particular statement by saying, “I have not a whit nor a tittle of faith in what he says.”

53. Not a whit nor a jot

This phrase is another variation of “not a jot nor a tittle” and is used to emphasize that something will never happen or is completely nonexistent. The term “whit” refers to a small amount or degree, while “jot” refers to a tiny or insignificant amount.

  • For example, “I have not a whit nor a jot of interest in that movie.”
  • In a discussion about the chances of success, someone might say, “There’s not a whit nor a jot of a possibility.”
  • A person might express their lack of trust in a particular statement by saying, “I have not a whit nor a jot of belief in what he claims.”

54. Not a whit nor a scrap

This phrase is used to emphasize that something will never happen or is completely nonexistent. The term “whit” refers to a small amount or degree, while “scrap” refers to a tiny or insignificant piece.

  • For instance, “I have not a whit nor a scrap of interest in that event.”
  • In a discussion about the likelihood of success, someone might say, “There’s not a whit nor a scrap of hope.”
  • A person might express their lack of faith in a particular statement by saying, “I have not a whit nor a scrap of trust in what he says.”

55. Not a whit nor a smidgen

This phrase is used to emphasize that something will never happen or is completely nonexistent. The term “whit” refers to a small amount or degree, while “smidgen” refers to a tiny or insignificant quantity.

  • For example, “I have not a whit nor a smidgen of interest in that topic.”
  • In a discussion about the likelihood of success, someone might say, “There’s not a whit nor a smidgen of a chance.”
  • A person might express their lack of belief in a particular statement by saying, “I have not a whit nor a smidgen of trust in what he claims.”

56. Not a whit nor a speck

This phrase is used to emphasize that something will never happen or is completely nonexistent. It is a poetic and old-fashioned way of expressing negation.

  • For example, “I will not give up, not a whit nor a speck.”
  • A person might say, “I have not seen him in years, not a whit nor a speck.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I will never forgive him, not a whit nor a speck.”

57. Not a whit nor a shred

This phrase is used to emphasize that there is absolutely no amount or quantity of something. It is a poetic and old-fashioned way of expressing negation.

  • For instance, “There is not a shred of evidence to support that claim, not a whit nor a shred.”
  • A person might say, “I have not a shred of doubt, not a whit nor a shred.”
  • Another might declare, “I will not give up, not a whit nor a shred.”

58. Not a whit nor a particle

This phrase is used to emphasize that there is not even a small quantity or particle of something. It is a poetic and old-fashioned way of expressing negation.

  • For example, “I have not a particle of regret, not a whit nor a particle.”
  • A person might say, “There is not a particle of truth in that statement, not a whit nor a particle.”
  • Another might state, “I will not tolerate any form of injustice, not a whit nor a particle.”

59. Not a whit nor a grain

This phrase is used to emphasize that there is absolutely no amount or quantity of something. It is a poetic and old-fashioned way of expressing negation.

  • For instance, “I have not a grain of doubt, not a whit nor a grain.”
  • A person might say, “There is not a grain of truth in that rumor, not a whit nor a grain.”
  • Another might declare, “I will not compromise my principles, not a whit nor a grain.”

60. Not a whit nor a mite

This phrase is used to emphasize that something will never happen or is completely nonexistent. It is a poetic and old-fashioned way of expressing negation.

  • For example, “I will not yield, not a whit nor a mite.”
  • A person might say, “There is not a mite of evidence to support that claim, not a whit nor a mite.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I will never forget, not a whit nor a mite.”

61. Not a whit nor a modicum

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is absolutely not happening or will not happen. It conveys a sense of complete negation or denial.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Did you enjoy the movie?” and you didn’t like it at all, you might respond, “Not a whit nor a modicum.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult task, someone might say, “I have not a whit nor a modicum of patience for that.”
  • If someone suggests a plan that you strongly disagree with, you might say, “That idea has not a whit nor a modicum of chance of success.”

62. Not a whit nor a fragment

Similar to the previous phrase, this expression is used to convey a complete lack or absence of something. It emphasizes that there is absolutely none of that thing.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you have any interest in a particular topic and you have no interest at all, you might respond, “Not a whit nor a fragment.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s cooking skills, you might say, “He has not a whit nor a fragment of culinary talent.”
  • If someone suggests a solution that you believe won’t work at all, you might say, “That plan has not a whit nor a fragment of a chance.”

63. Nuh-uh

This is a simple and informal way of saying “no.” It is often used in casual conversations or when someone wants to express a firm denial.

  • For example, if someone asks if you want to go out tonight and you don’t, you might respond, “Nuh-uh.”
  • In a discussion about a rumor, someone might say, “Nuh-uh, that’s not true at all.”
  • If someone suggests a risky activity and you want to decline, you might simply say, “Nuh-uh, I’m not doing that.”

64. No dice

This phrase is used to express a refusal or rejection of a suggestion or proposal. It indicates that something will not happen or is not possible.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you can lend them money and you cannot, you might respond, “No dice.”
  • In a conversation about a plan that is unlikely to succeed, someone might say, “We tried that before, but it was no dice.”
  • If someone suggests a shortcut that you believe won’t lead to the desired outcome, you might say, “No dice, we need to take the long route.”

65. Never ever

This phrase is used to emphasize that something will absolutely not happen or is completely impossible. It conveys a strong sense of denial or refusal.

  • For example, if someone asks if you would consider dating your ex again and you have no intention of doing so, you might respond, “Never ever.”
  • In a discussion about a risky decision, someone might say, “I would never ever take that kind of gamble.”
  • If someone suggests a plan that you believe is doomed to fail, you might say, “Never ever, it’s a recipe for disaster.”

66. No way Jose

This phrase is used to express strong disagreement or refusal. It emphasizes that something will never happen.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Will you lend me $100?” you might respond, “No way Jose!”
  • In a conversation about trying a risky activity, someone might say, “I would never go skydiving, no way Jose!”
  • Another example could be, “Do you think he’ll apologize?” and the response might be, “No way Jose, he’s too stubborn.”

67. No siree

This phrase is a more informal way of expressing strong disagreement or refusal. It is often used to emphasize that something will never happen.

  • For instance, if someone suggests, “Let’s go bungee jumping,” you might reply, “No siree, I’m afraid of heights.”
  • In a discussion about trying a new food, someone might say, “No siree, I would never eat insects.”
  • Another example could be, “Do you think she’ll forgive him?” and the response might be, “No siree, she’s still angry.”

68. Not by a long shot

This phrase means that something is not true or will not happen, often used to emphasize a negative outcome.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you think you’ll win the lottery?” you might respond, “Not by a long shot.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult challenge, someone might say, “I don’t think I’ll finish the marathon, not by a long shot.”
  • Another example could be, “Do you think they’ll hire you?” and the response might be, “Not by a long shot, I don’t have the experience they’re looking for.”

69. Not a snowball’s chance in hell

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is extremely unlikely or impossible to happen.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Do you think they’ll win the championship?” you might reply, “Not a snowball’s chance in hell.”
  • In a discussion about a challenging task, someone might say, “I have not a snowball’s chance in hell of finishing on time.”
  • Another example could be, “Do you think he’ll change his mind?” and the response might be, “Not a snowball’s chance in hell, he’s too stubborn.”

70. Not in this world

This phrase means that something is completely impossible or will never happen.

  • For example, if someone suggests, “Let’s go to the moon next weekend,” you might reply, “Not in this world.”
  • In a conversation about achieving a dream, someone might say, “Becoming a professional athlete? Not in this world.”
  • Another example could be, “Do you think they’ll forgive each other?” and the response might be, “Not in this world, they’re holding grudges.”

71. Not in a blue moon

This phrase is used to describe something that is highly improbable or will never happen. It emphasizes the rarity of the event or situation.

  • For example, “I would never go skydiving. Not in a blue moon!”
  • If someone asks, “Will you ever forgive him?” You might respond, “Not in a blue moon.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll never eat sushi. Not in a blue moon.”

72. Not in a million light years

This expression is used to convey that something is highly unlikely or will never happen. It emphasizes the vastness of time and space.

  • For instance, “I would never wear that outfit. Not in a million light years!”
  • If someone asks, “Will you ever move to a different country?” You might reply, “Not in a million light years.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll never understand quantum physics. Not in a million light years.”

73. Not in a pink fit

This phrase is used to assert that something will never happen under any circumstances. It emphasizes the impossibility or refusal of the situation.

  • For example, “I would never lend him money. Not in a pink fit!”
  • If someone asks, “Will you ever eat insects?” You might firmly state, “Not in a pink fit.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll never go back to that restaurant. Not in a pink fit.”

74. Not in a dog’s chance

This expression is used to convey that something will never happen or has no chance of occurring. It emphasizes the utter impossibility or unlikelihood of the situation.

  • For instance, “I would never win the lottery. Not in a dog’s chance!”
  • If someone asks, “Will you ever become a professional athlete?” You might reply, “Not in a dog’s chance.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll never pass that exam. Not in a dog’s chance.”

75. Not in a month of Mondays

This phrase is used to emphasize that something will never happen or is highly unlikely. It conveys a sense of time and repetition to emphasize the impossibility of the situation.

  • For example, “I would never go bungee jumping. Not in a month of Mondays!”
  • If someone asks, “Will you ever quit your job?” You might respond, “Not in a month of Mondays.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll never trust him again. Not in a month of Mondays.”

76. Not in a coon’s age

This phrase is used to express that something will never happen or hasn’t happened in a very long time. It is considered a derogatory term and should be used with caution.

  • For example, “I haven’t seen him in a coon’s age!”
  • Someone might say, “I’ve been waiting for that package to arrive, but it’s not coming in a coon’s age.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I haven’t been to the beach in a coon’s age!”

77. Not in a cat’s chance

This phrase is used to indicate that there is no chance or possibility of something happening. It implies that the likelihood is extremely low.

  • For instance, “You think he’ll apologize? Not in a cat’s chance!”
  • Someone might say, “I asked my boss for a raise, but I know there’s not in a cat’s chance.”
  • Another might comment, “I’ll finish this project by tomorrow. Not in a cat’s chance!”

78. Not in a bat’s chance

Similar to “not in a cat’s chance,” this phrase is used to convey that there is no chance or possibility of something happening. It emphasizes the unlikelihood of the event.

  • For example, “Do you think she’ll forgive him? Not in a bat’s chance!”
  • Someone might say, “I’ll win the lottery one day. Not in a bat’s chance!”
  • Another might exclaim, “He’ll make it to the party on time. Not in a bat’s chance!”

79. Not in a turkey’s chance

This phrase is used to express that there is no chance or possibility of something happening. It implies that the likelihood is extremely low, comparing the chance to that of a turkey surviving certain situations.

  • For instance, “Will they win the championship? Not in a turkey’s chance!”
  • Someone might say, “I’ll get a promotion without working hard. Not in a turkey’s chance!”
  • Another might comment, “We’ll finish the project by tomorrow. Not in a turkey’s chance!”

80. Not in a frog’s chance

Similar to the previous phrases, this expression indicates that there is no chance or possibility of something happening. It emphasizes the unlikelihood of the event, comparing it to a frog’s chances in certain situations.

  • For example, “Will they find a cure for that disease? Not in a frog’s chance!”
  • Someone might say, “I’ll win the race without training. Not in a frog’s chance!”
  • Another might exclaim, “He’ll pass the exam without studying. Not in a frog’s chance!”
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