Top 55 Slang For Newspaper – Meaning & Usage

Newspapers have long been a source of information and a reflection of society, but did you know they also have their own slang? From journos to above the fold, the newspaper industry has a language all its own. Whether you’re a news junkie or just curious about the inner workings of the press, we’ve got you covered with our list of the top slang terms used in the world of newspapers. Get ready to impress your friends with your newfound knowledge of this fascinating subculture!

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1. Press

This term refers to a news organization or the collective group of journalists and reporters who work in the field of journalism. It can also refer to the act of publishing or disseminating news.

  • For example, “The press has a responsibility to report the truth.”
  • In a discussion about media bias, someone might say, “The press should strive for objectivity.”
  • A journalist might refer to their profession by saying, “I work in the press.”

2. Rag

This slang term is used to refer to a newspaper, often with a connotation of it being of low quality or lacking credibility.

  • For instance, “I wouldn’t trust anything that’s written in that rag.”
  • In a discussion about tabloids, someone might say, “Tabloids are just sensationalized rags.”
  • A person might express their disdain for a particular newspaper by stating, “That paper is nothing but a rag.”

3. Paper

This is a common slang term for a newspaper, often used in casual conversations or informal contexts.

  • For example, “I read about it in the paper this morning.”
  • In a discussion about news sources, someone might say, “I prefer to get my news from online sources rather than the paper.”
  • A person might mention their daily routine by stating, “I like to sit down with a cup of coffee and read the paper in the morning.”

4. Tabloid

This term refers to a type of newspaper or magazine that focuses on sensational stories, celebrity gossip, and often includes provocative headlines and photographs.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe the tabloids are spreading such rumors.”
  • In a discussion about media ethics, someone might say, “Tabloids prioritize sensationalism over accuracy.”
  • A person might express their disinterest in tabloids by stating, “I don’t pay attention to those trashy tabloids.”

5. Daily

This term is used to refer to a newspaper that is published and distributed every day, usually on a regular schedule.

  • For example, “I subscribe to the local daily to stay updated on current events.”
  • In a discussion about print media, someone might say, “The decline of daily newspapers is a concerning trend.”
  • A person might mention their reading habits by stating, “I make it a point to read the daily every morning.”

6. Broadsheet

This term refers to a large-sized newspaper, typically measuring around 29 inches by 23 inches. Broadsheets are known for their serious and in-depth coverage of news and are often associated with quality journalism.

  • For example, “The broasheet featured an extensive report on the political scandal.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer reading broasheets because they provide more detailed analysis.”
  • In a discussion about media, someone might mention, “The decline of broasheets has been attributed to the rise of digital news.”

7. Sheet

This term is a colloquial way of referring to a newspaper. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For instance, “I’ll grab a sheet from the newsstand on my way to work.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any sheets left? I want to read the latest headlines.”
  • In a conversation about media consumption, someone might say, “I still enjoy reading a physical sheet rather than browsing news online.”

8. Journal

This term is used to refer to a newspaper, especially one that focuses on specific industries or professions. It is often used in the context of specialized publications or magazines.

  • For example, “The medical journal published a groundbreaking study on cancer research.”
  • A person might say, “I subscribe to several journals to stay updated on the latest developments in my field.”
  • In a discussion about journalism, someone might mention, “Journalism has evolved from traditional newspapers to online journals.”

9. Gazette

This term refers to a newspaper, particularly one that publishes official notices, government announcements, and legal information. Gazettes are often associated with official and formal news.

  • For instance, “The government published the new tax regulations in the gazette.”
  • A person might ask, “Have you checked the gazette for any public notices?”
  • In a conversation about media credibility, someone might say, “I trust the information published in the gazette more than social media posts.”

10. Times

This term is used to refer to a reputable and widely recognized newspaper that is considered to provide comprehensive and accurate coverage of news. “Times” is often used as a shorthand for newspapers that have “Times” in their title, such as “The New York Times” or “The Times of London.”

  • For example, “The Times reported on the latest political scandal with in-depth analysis.”
  • A person might say, “I always turn to The Times for reliable news.”
  • In a discussion about media bias, someone might mention, “The Times is known for its objective reporting.”

11. Chronicle

A term used to refer to a newspaper, often implying a sense of tradition and history. “Chronicle” can also be used as a verb, meaning to record or document events in a detailed and chronological manner.

  • For example, “I read about the incident in the local chronicle.”
  • A journalist might say, “I need to chronicle the events of the protest for tomorrow’s edition.”
  • In a discussion about the decline of print media, someone might comment, “I miss the days when I could sit down with a cup of coffee and read the morning chronicle.”

12. Post

A common term for a newspaper, often used to refer to a specific publication or company. “Post” can also be used as a verb, meaning to publish or share information.

  • For instance, “I subscribe to the city post.”
  • A journalist might say, “I need to post an article about the latest political scandal.”
  • In a conversation about news sources, someone might ask, “Which post do you prefer for local news?”

13. Herald

A term used to refer to a newspaper, often implying a sense of authority and importance. “Herald” can also be used as a verb, meaning to announce or proclaim.

  • For example, “I read about the election results in the national herald.”
  • A journalist might say, “I need to herald the breaking news on social media.”
  • In a discussion about reliable news sources, someone might comment, “The herald has always been a trusted publication.”

14. Bulletin

A term used to refer to a short news update or announcement, often posted in a public place. “Bulletin” can also be used as a verb, meaning to announce or share information.

  • For instance, “I saw the bulletin about the upcoming event in the office.”
  • A journalist might say, “I need to bulletin the latest developments in the investigation.”
  • In a conversation about staying informed, someone might recommend, “Check the bulletin for quick news updates.”

15. Newsprint

A term used to refer to the type of paper used for printing newspapers. “Newsprint” can also be used to describe the content or style of traditional print journalism.

  • For example, “The newsprint is smudging my fingers.”
  • A journalist might say, “I miss the smell of newsprint in the morning.”
  • In a discussion about the future of journalism, someone might comment, “Newsprint may be fading, but the need for quality reporting remains.”

16. Print

This term refers to the physical version of a newspaper that is printed on paper. It is used to distinguish the traditional printed format from digital or online versions.

  • For example, “I prefer reading the print edition of the newspaper.”
  • A person might say, “I like the feel of a print newspaper in my hands.”
  • In a discussion about journalism, someone might argue, “Print newspapers are still relevant in today’s digital age.”

17. Mag

This slang term is a shortened form of the word “magazine” and refers to a periodical publication that usually contains articles, stories, and photographs on a particular subject.

  • For instance, “I enjoy reading fashion mags.”
  • A person might say, “I subscribed to a tech mag to stay up-to-date with the latest gadgets.”
  • In a conversation about hobbies, someone might mention, “I collect vintage car mags.”

18. Daily News

This term is used to refer to a newspaper that is published and distributed every day, typically covering local, national, and international news.

  • For example, “I read the daily news to stay informed.”
  • A person might say, “The daily news keeps me up-to-date with current events.”
  • In a discussion about media, someone might argue, “The decline of daily newspapers is a concerning trend.”

19. Daily Post

This term is used to refer to a daily newspaper or publication that covers news and events.

  • For instance, “I always check the daily post for the latest headlines.”
  • A person might say, “The daily post provides comprehensive coverage of local news.”
  • In a conversation about journalism, someone might mention, “I used to work for a daily post as a reporter.”

20. Daily Chronicle

This term is used to refer to a daily newspaper that chronicles or reports news and events.

  • For example, “The daily chronicle is known for its investigative journalism.”
  • A person might say, “I rely on the daily chronicle for accurate and unbiased news.”
  • In a discussion about media, someone might argue, “The decline of the daily chronicle is a loss for quality journalism.”

21. Daily Herald

This is a term used to refer to a daily newspaper, often with a focus on local news and events. “The Herald” is a common nickname for newspapers with “Daily Herald” in their title.

  • For example, someone might say, “I read The Herald every morning to stay updated on local news.”
  • In a conversation about newspapers, a person might mention, “The Daily Herald is known for its in-depth investigative journalism.”
  • A news enthusiast might comment, “I appreciate The Herald’s coverage of community events and local issues.”

22. Daily Bulletin

This term is used to describe a daily newspaper that provides short, concise news articles and updates. “Bulletin” refers to the quick and informative nature of the newspaper.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I like reading the Bulletin because it gives me a summary of the day’s news.”
  • In a discussion about news sources, a person might recommend, “If you want to stay informed but don’t have much time, check out the Daily Bulletin.”
  • A news junkie might mention, “I always grab a copy of the Bulletin during my morning commute to catch up on the latest headlines.”

23. Daily Journal

This slang term refers to a daily newspaper that focuses on providing in-depth analysis, opinion pieces, and feature stories. “Journal” implies a more thoughtful and reflective approach to news reporting.

  • For example, someone might say, “I enjoy reading the Journal because it offers well-researched articles and insightful commentary.”
  • In a conversation about news preferences, a person might state, “I prefer the Daily Journal over other newspapers because of its in-depth reporting.”
  • A journalist might mention, “Working for the Daily Journal allows me to dive deep into important issues and tell compelling stories.”

24. Daily Gazette

This term is used to describe a daily newspaper that focuses on local news, announcements, and community events. “Gazette” refers to a newspaper that serves as a record of daily happenings in a particular area.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I always check the Gazette to see what’s happening in our town.”
  • In a discussion about community engagement, a person might mention, “The Daily Gazette is a great source of information for local events and initiatives.”
  • A resident might comment, “I appreciate the Gazette’s dedication to covering news that directly affects our community.”

25. Daily Times

This term refers to a daily newspaper that covers a wide range of news topics, including local, national, and international news. “Times” is a common nickname for newspapers with “Daily Times” in their title.

  • For example, someone might say, “I subscribe to the Times because it provides a comprehensive overview of current events.”
  • In a conversation about news sources, a person might mention, “The Daily Times has a reputation for reliable reporting and balanced coverage.”
  • A news enthusiast might comment, “I enjoy reading the Times because it keeps me informed about a variety of topics.”

26. Weekly

A weekly publication that contains news, articles, and features. “Rag” is a slang term often used to refer to a weekly newspaper, especially in a casual or derogatory manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “I love reading the local rag to catch up on community events.”
  • In a discussion about media bias, a person might claim, “The rag always twists the facts to fit their agenda.”
  • A journalist might refer to their own publication as a rag, saying, “Check out our latest issue of the weekly rag for in-depth investigative reporting.”

27. Periodical

A regularly published publication that contains articles, stories, and other written material. “Magazine” is a more formal term that can be used interchangeably with “periodical” to refer to a newspaper or other printed publication.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I subscribe to several fashion magazines to stay up-to-date on the latest trends.”
  • In a discussion about print media, a person might argue, “Magazines offer a more immersive reading experience compared to online articles.”
  • A writer might mention, “I’ve had several of my articles published in prestigious literary periodicals.”

28. Daily Bugle

A fictional newspaper often referenced in the Marvel Comics universe, particularly in relation to the character Spider-Man. “Paper” is a common slang term used to refer to a newspaper in general.

  • For example, a fan of Spider-Man might say, “Peter Parker works as a photographer for the Daily Bugle.”
  • In a discussion about the decline of print media, someone might comment, “I miss the days of sitting down with a cup of coffee and reading the morning paper.”
  • A journalist might refer to their own publication as the paper, saying, “Check out tomorrow’s edition for an exclusive interview with a local celebrity.”

29. Gazetteer

A historical term for a newspaper or official journal that contains news, announcements, and public notices. “Gazette” is a more formal term that can be used interchangeably with “gazetteer” to refer to a newspaper or other printed publication.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The government published a gazette with the latest regulations and policies.”
  • In a discussion about historical newspapers, a person might mention, “I found an old gazette from the 1800s that documented significant events in our town.”
  • A researcher might refer to a collection of old newspapers as a gazetteer, saying, “I’ve been digging through the gazetteer archives to uncover forgotten stories from the past.”

30. Courier

A term used to refer to a newspaper or other printed publication that delivers news and information to the public. “Press” is a more general term that can encompass various forms of media, including newspapers, magazines, and online publications.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I work for a local courier, covering news and events in our community.”
  • In a discussion about the importance of a free press, someone might argue, “A strong and independent press is essential for a functioning democracy.”
  • A media professional might refer to the industry as the press, saying, “I’ve been working in the press for over a decade, reporting on a wide range of topics.”

31. Dispatch

A dispatch refers to a news report or article that is sent or transmitted to a newspaper or media outlet. It can also refer to the act of sending or transmitting news.

  • For example, “The journalist filed a dispatch from the war zone.”
  • A newsroom editor might say, “We need to get this dispatch out ASAP.”
  • A reporter might ask, “Has anyone seen my dispatch on the mayor’s press conference?”

32. Journal Sentinel

The term “Journal Sentinel” refers specifically to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, which is a daily newspaper based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. It is often used to refer to the local newspaper in general, particularly in the Milwaukee area.

  • For instance, “I read about the event in the Journal Sentinel.”
  • A resident of Milwaukee might say, “I get my news from the Journal Sentinel.”
  • A journalist might mention, “The Journal Sentinel is known for its investigative reporting.”

33. Sun

“Sun” is a common term used to refer to a newspaper, particularly in the context of tabloid-style publications. It can also be used as a shorthand way of referring to a specific newspaper with “Sun” in its name.

  • For example, “I picked up the Sunday Sun to read the latest headlines.”
  • A person might say, “I always grab a copy of the Sun on my way to work.”
  • A journalist might mention, “The Sun broke the story before any other newspaper.”

34. Tribune

The term “Tribune” is often used to refer to a news organization or newspaper company. It can also specifically refer to newspapers with “Tribune” in their name, such as the Chicago Tribune.

  • For instance, “The Tribune is a respected source of news.”
  • A person might say, “I subscribe to the local Tribune for my daily news.”
  • A journalist might mention, “The Tribune has won multiple Pulitzer Prizes for its reporting.”

35. Examiner

The term “Examiner” can refer to an investigative journalist or a newspaper that focuses on investigative reporting. It often implies a thorough examination or investigation of a particular topic or issue.

  • For example, “The examiner uncovered corruption within the government.”
  • A person might say, “I trust the examiner to dig deep and uncover the truth.”
  • A journalist might mention, “The examiner’s report exposed widespread fraud in the industry.”

36. Register

A derogatory term used to refer to a newspaper, implying that it is of poor quality or lacks credibility. The term “rag” suggests that the newspaper is cheaply made or not worth reading.

  • For example, someone might say, “I wouldn’t waste your time reading that rag.”
  • In a discussion about biased reporting, a person might comment, “That rag is clearly pushing a specific agenda.”
  • A person might dismiss a newspaper article by saying, “I don’t trust anything that comes from that rag.”

37. Mirror

A type of newspaper that focuses on sensationalist stories and celebrity gossip. Tabloids often have a smaller format and are known for their eye-catching headlines and provocative content.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I prefer serious journalism over tabloids like the Mirror.”
  • In a discussion about media standards, a person might argue, “Tabloids like the Mirror prioritize entertainment value over factual reporting.”
  • A person might criticize a news article by saying, “That story reads like something you’d find in a tabloid.”

38. Express

A term used to describe a newspaper with a red masthead or logo. “Red top” is often used to refer to tabloid newspapers, which are known for their sensationalist headlines and focus on celebrity gossip.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t believe people still read those red tops.”
  • In a discussion about media bias, a person might comment, “Red tops like the Express are notorious for their sensationalist reporting.”
  • A person might dismiss a news article by saying, “I wouldn’t trust anything that comes from a red top.”

39. Star

A type of sensationalist and biased journalism that prioritizes scandalous stories and catchy headlines over factual reporting. “Yellow journalism” is often associated with tabloid newspapers that use exaggerated or misleading headlines to attract readers.

  • For instance, someone might say, “That article is a prime example of yellow journalism.”
  • In a discussion about media ethics, a person might argue, “Yellow journalism undermines the credibility of the press.”
  • A person might criticize a news outlet by saying, “They’re more interested in clickbait than real journalism. It’s yellow journalism at its worst.”

40. Guardian

A humorous nickname for The Guardian, a British newspaper known for its left-leaning political stance and occasionally typographical errors. “The Grauniad” originated from a long history of the newspaper making spelling and grammatical mistakes.

  • For example, someone might say, “Have you read the latest from The Grauniad?”
  • In a discussion about media bias, a person might comment, “The Grauniad is often accused of having a liberal agenda.”
  • A person might make a lighthearted remark about the newspaper by saying, “Ah, The Grauniad, always keeping us entertained with their typos.”

41. Independent

This term refers to a newspaper that is not affiliated with any major media corporation or political party. Independent newspapers often prioritize unbiased reporting and alternative perspectives.

  • For example, “I prefer to read indie newspapers because they provide a different viewpoint.”
  • A journalist might say, “Working for an independent newspaper allows me to report without any corporate influence.”
  • Someone might recommend, “If you want to get a fresh take on the news, check out some indie newspapers.”

42. Voice

In the context of slang for newspapers, “voice” refers to a publication that represents a specific community or demographic. These newspapers often focus on issues relevant to their target audience and aim to give a voice to underrepresented groups.

  • For instance, “The local voice newspaper covers stories that matter to our neighborhood.”
  • A reader might say, “I appreciate how the voice newspaper highlights stories that mainstream media often overlooks.”
  • An editor might explain, “Our goal as a voice publication is to amplify the voices of marginalized communities.”

43. Observer

This term is slang for The Observer, a British newspaper known for its investigative journalism and political reporting. “The O” is a shorthand way of referring to the publication.

  • For example, “Did you read the latest article in The O?”
  • A journalist might say, “I’ve always aspired to work for The O because of their commitment to in-depth reporting.”
  • Someone might recommend, “If you want to stay informed about current events, make sure to follow The O.”

44. Leader

In slang for newspapers, “leader” refers to a newspaper that is considered the primary source of news and information in a particular area. It is often the most widely read and respected publication.

  • For instance, “The paper ran an exclusive story about the local election.”
  • A reader might say, “I always start my day by reading the paper to catch up on the news.”
  • Someone might ask, “Did you see the headline in the paper today?”

45. Insider

This term is slang for a newspaper or media industry insider. It refers to someone who is knowledgeable about the workings of the industry and has access to exclusive information.

  • For example, “As a newsie, I have the inside scoop on upcoming stories.”
  • A journalist might say, “I love being an insider because I get to break news before anyone else.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you introduce me to some newsies? I want to network in the industry.”

46. Journalist

A journalist is a person who collects, writes, or distributes news or other current information to the public. “Journo” is a slang term used to refer to a journalist, often used in a casual or familiar context.

  • For instance, a newsroom colleague might say, “Hey journo, did you catch the press conference?”
  • In a conversation about the media, someone might comment, “Being a journo requires a lot of dedication and perseverance.”
  • A journalist might introduce themselves by saying, “I’m a journo covering local politics.”

47. Reporter

A reporter is a journalist who investigates, gathers, and presents information about events, people, or issues to the public. “Newshound” is a slang term used to describe a reporter, emphasizing their dedication and persistence in seeking out news.

  • For example, a fellow journalist might say, “The newshound never misses a scoop.”
  • In a discussion about the media, someone might comment, “Reporters, or newshounds as they’re sometimes called, are always on the lookout for a good story.”
  • A reporter might describe their work by saying, “As a newshound, I’m constantly chasing leads and uncovering stories.”

48. Editor

An editor is a person who prepares written material for publication by correcting, condensing, or otherwise modifying it. “Wordsmith” is a slang term used to refer to an editor, highlighting their skill in crafting and refining written content.

  • For instance, a fellow editor might say, “The wordsmith did an excellent job polishing that article.”
  • In a conversation about the publishing industry, someone might comment, “Editors, or wordsmiths as they’re sometimes called, play a crucial role in shaping the final product.”
  • An editor might introduce themselves by saying, “I’m a wordsmith specializing in fiction editing.”

49. Publisher

A publisher is a person or company that produces and distributes printed or digital material, such as books, magazines, or newspapers. “Media mogul” is a slang term used to describe a publisher, suggesting their influence and power in the media industry.

  • For example, someone might say, “The media mogul owns several major publishing companies.”
  • In a discussion about the media landscape, someone might comment, “Publishers, or media moguls as they’re sometimes called, have a significant impact on what content reaches the public.”
  • A publisher might describe their role by saying, “As a media mogul, I oversee the production and distribution of various publications.”

50. Newsie

A newsie is a slang term used to refer to someone who sells or delivers newspapers, often used to describe young boys or girls in the past who worked as newspaper vendors. “Newsboy” is another term used interchangeably with newsie.

  • For instance, a person might say, “The newsies on the street corner are always shouting the latest headlines.”
  • In a conversation about the history of newspapers, someone might comment, “Newsies played an important role in distributing newspapers before the digital age.”
  • A former newsie might share their experience by saying, “I used to work as a newsboy, selling papers on the busy city streets.”

51. Ink

This term refers to the traditional method of printing newspapers, where ink is used to transfer text and images onto paper. It can also be used more broadly to refer to the newspaper industry as a whole.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I’ve been working in the ink-stained world of newspapers for 20 years.”
  • In a discussion about the decline of print media, someone might comment, “The rise of digital news has put ink on the endangered list.”
  • A person might refer to a newspaper as “the ink” when asking,“the ink” when asking, “Did you read the ink this morning?”

52. Presser

This term is a colloquial way to refer to a journalist or someone who works in the newspaper industry. It can also be used to describe the act of printing or publishing a newspaper.

  • For instance, a reporter might say, “I’m a presser for the local paper.”
  • In a conversation about media careers, someone might ask, “Are you considering becoming a presser?”
  • A person discussing the importance of journalism might argue, “Pressers play a crucial role in keeping the public informed.”

53. Zine

Short for “magazine,” this term refers to a self-published and often non-commercial publication. Zines are typically produced in small quantities and cover niche topics or interests.

  • For example, someone might say, “I started my own zine to showcase local artists.”
  • In a discussion about DIY culture, a person might comment, “Zines are a great way for marginalized voices to be heard.”
  • A person might recommend a zine by saying, “You should check out this zine. It’s full of amazing poetry.”

54. Record

In the context of newspapers, this term refers to a written piece of content that is published in the publication. It can also be used more broadly to refer to any individual story or news item.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “I need to finish writing my record for tomorrow’s edition.”
  • In a conversation about breaking news, someone might ask, “Did you see the record about the earthquake?”
  • A person might recommend a record by saying, “You should read this record. It’s an eye-opening investigation.”

55. Column

A column is a regular feature in a newspaper where a specific writer shares their opinions or commentary on a particular topic. It is often a recurring segment that readers look forward to.

  • For example, a newspaper might have a sports column where a writer shares their thoughts on recent games.
  • In a discussion about journalism, someone might comment, “Columnists have the freedom to express their views in their columns.”
  • A person might recommend a column by saying, “You should read this column. The writer presents a compelling argument.”
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