Top 33 Slang For Nonexistent – Meaning & Usage

Ever heard someone use slang that seems to come from a parallel universe? You’re not alone! In this article, we’re diving into the world of slang for nonexistent things that will leave you scratching your head and laughing at the creativity of language. Stay tuned as we unravel the mystery behind these quirky expressions and add some fun words to your linguistic repertoire!

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1. Fictitious

This word refers to something that is not real or does not actually exist. “Fictitious” is often used to describe fictional characters, places, or events.

  • For example, “Harry Potter is a fictitious character created by J.K. Rowling.”
  • In a discussion about conspiracy theories, one might say, “The existence of aliens is purely fictitious.”
  • A person might use this word to describe a rumor or gossip, saying, “That story about the celebrity dating a ghost is completely fictitious.”

2. Imaginary

This term is used to describe something that is not real or does not exist in reality. “Imaginary” often refers to things that exist only in the imagination or in someone’s mind.

  • For instance, “Children often have imaginary friends who they believe are real.”
  • In a conversation about fantasy novels, one might say, “The author created an entire imaginary world for the story.”
  • A person might use this word to dismiss an unrealistic idea, saying, “That plan is just imaginary. It will never work.”

3. Nonexistent

This word describes something that does not exist or is not present. “Nonexistent” is often used to indicate the absence or lack of something.

  • For example, “The evidence for that theory is nonexistent.”
  • In a discussion about a missing person, one might say, “There are no leads. It’s like they’re nonexistent.”
  • A person might use this word to describe a failed business, saying, “After only a few months, the company was practically nonexistent.”

4. Inexistent

Similar to “nonexistent,” this term describes something that does not exist or is not present. “Inexistent” is a less common synonym for “nonexistent.”

  • For instance, “The supposed secret treasure is inexistent. It’s just a myth.”
  • In a conversation about mythical creatures, one might say, “Dragons are inexistent beings.”
  • A person might use this word to describe a false claim, saying, “The evidence for that conspiracy theory is completely inexistent.”

5. Unreal

This word is used to describe something that does not exist or is not real. “Unreal” often implies that something is so extraordinary or unbelievable that it seems impossible.

  • For example, “The special effects in that movie were so good, they made the dinosaurs look unreal.”
  • In a discussion about a miraculous event, one might say, “The rescue was so dramatic, it felt unreal.”
  • A person might use this word to describe a dream or fantasy, saying, “I had this unreal idea for a novel, but I never wrote it.”

6. Illusory

Something that appears real or true but is actually false or misleading. “Illusory” is often used to describe something that creates a false impression or is based on illusion.

  • For instance, a magician might perform an illusion that makes it seem like something is disappearing.
  • In a philosophical discussion, one might ponder, “Are our perceptions of reality merely illusory?”
  • A person might say, “His promises turned out to be illusory, just empty words with no substance.”

7. Phantom

A phantom is a ghost or spirit that is believed to haunt a particular place or object. The term “phantom” is used to describe something that is elusive, mysterious, or difficult to grasp.

  • For example, in a horror movie, a character might encounter a phantom in a haunted house.
  • A person might say, “I saw a phantom figure out of the corner of my eye, but when I turned, it was gone.”
  • In a metaphorical sense, one might describe a fleeting dream as a phantom that disappears upon waking.
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8. Ghostly

Something that is ghostly is eerie, ethereal, or reminiscent of a ghost. The term “ghostly” is often used to describe something that is supernatural or otherworldly in nature.

  • For instance, a person might describe a pale, transparent figure as ghostly.
  • In a spooky story, the author might set the scene with a description of ghostly shadows and mysterious sounds.
  • A person might say, “I felt a ghostly presence in the old abandoned house, as if someone was watching me.”

9. Apparitional

Something that is apparitional is ghost-like or spectral in nature. The term “apparitional” is often used to describe something that appears as an apparition or ghostly figure.

  • For example, a person might describe a fleeting image they saw as apparitional.
  • In a supernatural novel, the author might describe an apparitional presence that haunts the main character.
  • A person might say, “I had an apparitional experience last night, where I saw a figure at the foot of my bed.”

10. Mythical

Something that is mythical is related to myths or legends, often involving gods, heroes, or supernatural beings. The term “mythical” is used to describe something that is fictional, imaginary, or legendary in nature.

  • For instance, a person might talk about mythical creatures like dragons or unicorns.
  • In a fantasy novel, the author might create a mythical world with its own mythology and legends.
  • A person might say, “The story of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table is a famous mythical tale.”

11. Fabricated

Fabricated means something that is invented or created, often with the intention to deceive or mislead. It refers to something that is not real or true.

  • For example, “The witness admitted that his testimony was fabricated.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t believe everything you read online; some stories are fabricated for clickbait.”
  • In a discussion about conspiracy theories, someone might claim, “The moon landing was fabricated by the government.”

12. Unsubstantial

Unsubstantial means lacking substance or being insubstantial. It describes something that is not real or substantial.

  • For instance, “His claims are unsubstantial and lack evidence.”
  • A person might say, “The rumors about their relationship are unsubstantial; there’s no proof.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “Your argument is unsubstantial and lacks logic.”

13. Chimerical

Chimerical means something that is wildly fanciful or imaginary. It refers to something that is highly unrealistic or impossible.

  • For example, “His dreams of becoming a millionaire overnight are chimerical.”
  • A person might say, “The chances of winning the lottery are chimerical.”
  • In a discussion about magical creatures, someone might mention, “Unicorns are chimerical beings that have captured people’s imagination for centuries.”

14. Quixotic

Quixotic means to be idealistic in a way that is impractical or unrealistic. It refers to someone who pursues lofty goals or dreams without considering the practicality or feasibility.

  • For instance, “His plan to solve world hunger single-handedly is quixotic.”
  • A person might say, “I admire her quixotic pursuit of justice, even though it seems impossible.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might criticize a politician’s quixotic promises, saying, “Those campaign promises are unrealistic and quixotic.”

15. Delusional

Delusional means to have false or irrational beliefs, often in the face of overwhelming evidence to the contrary. It refers to someone who is out of touch with reality.

  • For example, “He is delusional if he thinks he can fly without wings.”
  • A person might say, “She is delusional about her singing ability; she’s completely tone-deaf.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might explain, “Delusional thinking is a symptom of certain psychiatric disorders.”

16. Utopian

Utopian is used to describe something that is perfect, idealistic, or imagined to be perfect. It often refers to an imaginary place or state of things where everything is perfect.

  • For example, someone might say, “Living in a utopian society would mean no poverty or inequality.”
  • In a discussion about the future, someone might say, “I have a utopian vision for a world powered by renewable energy.”
  • A person might describe a perfect vacation as, “A utopian getaway on a tropical island with crystal-clear waters and white sandy beaches.”

17. Visionary

A visionary is someone who has the ability to think creatively and imagine new possibilities. It often refers to someone who has a clear vision for the future and is able to inspire others with their ideas.

  • For instance, “Steve Jobs was a visionary who revolutionized the technology industry with his innovative products.”
  • In a discussion about art, one might say, “Picasso was a visionary painter who pushed the boundaries of traditional art.”
  • A person might describe a leader as, “A visionary who can inspire others to work towards a common goal.”

18. Phantasmal

Phantasmal is used to describe something that is ghostly or illusory in nature. It often refers to something that appears to be real but is actually imaginary or unreal.

  • For example, “The phantasmal figure floated through the haunted house.”
  • In a discussion about dreams, someone might say, “I had a phantasmal experience where I thought I was flying.”
  • A person might describe a mirage in the desert as, “A phantasmal image that disappears when approached.”

19. Dreamlike

Dreamlike is used to describe something that resembles a dream or is surreal and fantastical in nature. It often refers to something that is not grounded in reality and has a sense of unreality or magic.

  • For instance, “The sunset over the ocean created a dreamlike atmosphere.”
  • In a discussion about art, one might say, “Salvador Dali’s paintings have a dreamlike quality.”
  • A person might describe a fairytale as, “A story with dreamlike elements and magical creatures.”

20. Make-believe

Make-believe is used to describe something that is imaginary or pretend. It often refers to activities or stories that involve pretending or creating an imaginary world.

  • For example, “Children often engage in make-believe play where they pretend to be different characters.”
  • In a discussion about storytelling, one might say, “Make-believe allows us to escape reality and explore our imagination.”
  • A person might describe a fantasy novel as, “A make-believe world filled with mythical creatures and magical powers.”

21. Shadowy

This term refers to something that is difficult to see or understand. It suggests a sense of mystery or secrecy.

  • For example, “The shadowy figure disappeared into the night.”
  • In a conversation about conspiracy theories, someone might say, “There’s a shadowy organization pulling the strings behind the scenes.”
  • A person describing a dream might say, “I had a shadowy figure following me throughout the dream.”

22. Unrealistic

This term describes something that is not grounded in reality and is highly unlikely to happen or exist.

  • For instance, “His expectations are completely unrealistic.”
  • In a discussion about movie plots, someone might say, “The storyline is so unrealistic, it’s hard to suspend disbelief.”
  • A person criticizing a proposal might say, “That idea is unrealistic and impractical.”

23. Phantasmagorical

This term refers to something that is characterized by a sequence of bizarre or fantastical imagery, like a dream.

  • For example, “The artist created a phantasmagorical painting that transported viewers to another world.”
  • In a description of a fantasy novel, one might say, “The author’s world-building is phantasmagorical, filled with magical creatures and surreal landscapes.”
  • A person discussing an abstract artwork might say, “The painting’s phantasmagorical elements evoke a dreamlike atmosphere.”

24. Unseen

This term describes something that cannot be seen or detected.

  • For instance, “The creature lurked in the unseen depths of the forest.”
  • In a conversation about hidden dangers, someone might say, “We must be cautious of the unseen risks.”
  • A person describing a ghostly encounter might say, “I felt a presence in the room, even though it was unseen.”

25. Vanishing

This term describes something that is gradually or suddenly disappearing or becoming less visible.

  • For example, “The magician performed a vanishing trick, making the object disappear.”
  • In a discussion about endangered species, someone might say, “The population of tigers is vanishing at an alarming rate.”
  • A person describing a distant memory might say, “The details of that day are vanishing from my mind.”

26. Absent

This term refers to something that is not present or does not exist.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Is there any evidence of ghosts?” a response might be, “No, ghosts are absent from scientific evidence.”
  • In a discussion about mythical creatures, someone might say, “Unicorns are absent from the natural world, but they exist in folklore.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a missing item by saying, “My keys are absent. I can’t find them anywhere.”

27. Fictional

This word describes something that is made up or not real.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Dragons are fictional creatures that appear in many fantasy stories.”
  • In a discussion about superheroes, someone might mention, “Superman is a fictional character created by DC Comics.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a story by saying, “That novel is a fictional account of historical events.”

28. Bogus

This term is used to describe something that is not genuine or true.

  • For example, if someone tries to sell counterfeit merchandise, it can be described as bogus.
  • In a conversation about scams, someone might say, “That email claiming you won a million dollars is clearly bogus.”
  • A person might use this term to express disbelief by saying, “That excuse for being late is totally bogus.”

29. Invented

This word describes something that has been created or fabricated and does not actually exist.

  • For instance, if someone claims to have seen a creature that no one else has ever heard of, it can be described as invented.
  • In a discussion about conspiracy theories, someone might say, “The idea that aliens are secretly controlling the government is completely invented.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a made-up story by saying, “That novel is an invented tale set in a fictional world.”

30. Spurious

This term is used to describe something that is not genuine or authentic.

  • For example, if someone presents false evidence in a court case, it can be described as spurious.
  • In a conversation about scientific studies, someone might say, “That study’s methodology is flawed, leading to spurious results.”
  • A person might use this term to criticize a claim by saying, “His argument is based on spurious assumptions.”

31. Ethereal

This term is used to describe something that is delicate, airy, or lacking substance. It can refer to something that is difficult to perceive or grasp.

  • For example, a person might describe a beautiful sunset as “ethereal.”
  • In a fantasy novel, a character might encounter an ethereal being that can pass through walls.
  • A poet might use the term to describe a fleeting moment of happiness as “ethereal.”
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32. Unfounded

This term is used to describe something that has no basis in fact or evidence. It suggests that a claim or belief is not grounded in reality.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The rumor about her cheating on the test is completely unfounded.”
  • In a court of law, a lawyer might argue that the charges against their client are unfounded.
  • A journalist might investigate a story and find that the initial allegations were unfounded.

33. Hypothetical

This term is used to describe something that is based on a hypothesis or assumption rather than actual facts or evidence. It refers to a situation or scenario that is imagined or supposed.

  • For example, a teacher might present a hypothetical situation to engage students in critical thinking.
  • In a philosophical discussion, participants might debate the ethical implications of a hypothetical scenario.
  • A scientist might use hypothetical models to explore possible outcomes before conducting experiments.