Top 46 Slang For Not Accept – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing disapproval or rejection in a more casual and trendy way, we’ve got you covered with the top slang terms for “not accept.” Whether you’re looking to spice up your conversations or simply stay in the loop with the latest language trends, this listicle is your go-to guide. Join us as we unveil the coolest and most popular phrases to convey a sense of refusal or disagreement in style. Get ready to level up your slang game and impress your friends with these fresh expressions!

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1. Nix

To reject or dismiss something, often in a decisive or final manner. “Nix” is a slang term used to indicate a firm refusal or disapproval.

  • For instance, if someone suggests a plan that is immediately shot down, they might say, “Well, that idea is nixed.”
  • In a discussion about potential changes to a project, someone might say, “Let’s nix that idea and focus on something else.”
  • A person might respond to an invitation by saying, “Sorry, I’ll have to nix that. I already have plans.”

2. Pass

To refuse or turn down an offer or opportunity. “Pass” is a slang term commonly used to indicate a lack of interest or desire to participate.

  • For example, if someone is offered a piece of cake but doesn’t want any, they might say, “I’ll pass.”
  • In a discussion about joining a club, someone might say, “I think I’ll pass on that. It’s not really my thing.”
  • A person might decline an invitation by saying, “Thanks for the offer, but I’ll have to pass this time.”

3. Veto

To reject or forbid a decision or proposal made by others. “Veto” is a term often used in a political or authoritative context to indicate the power to block or prevent something from happening.

  • For instance, if a group is voting on a new rule and someone strongly disagrees, they might say, “I veto that idea.”
  • In a discussion about potential legislation, a politician might say, “I will use my veto power to stop this bill from becoming law.”
  • A person might express their disapproval of a plan by saying, “I have to veto this. It’s not in the best interest of the team.”

4. Deny

To refuse to grant or accept something, often due to a lack of eligibility or validity. “Deny” is a general term used to indicate the act of rejecting or declining something.

  • For example, if someone applies for a job but is not selected, they might receive a letter saying, “We regret to inform you that your application has been denied.”
  • In a discussion about a request for a loan, a bank representative might say, “Based on your credit history, we have to deny your application.”
  • A person might refuse an offer by saying, “I appreciate the opportunity, but I have to deny it due to personal reasons.”

5. Decline

To politely refuse or reject an invitation, request, or offer. “Decline” is a more formal term used to indicate a respectful refusal.

  • For instance, if someone is invited to a party but cannot attend, they might RSVP with a note saying, “I regretfully decline the invitation.”
  • In a discussion about a job offer, a person might say, “After careful consideration, I have decided to decline the position.”
  • A person might turn down a dinner invitation by saying, “Thank you for the invite, but I’ll have to decline. I have other plans.”

6. Turn down

To refuse or decline an offer or request. “Turn down” is a colloquial term often used to indicate a negative response.

  • For example, if someone asks you to go to a party and you decline, you might say, “I had to turn down the invitation because I already had plans.”
  • In a job interview, if you are not offered the position, you might say, “Unfortunately, they turned me down for the job.”
  • A student might say, “I turned down the opportunity to study abroad because of financial constraints.”

7. Refuse

To say no or reject something. “Refuse” is a formal term often used to indicate a strong negative response.

  • For instance, if someone offers you a piece of cake and you don’t want it, you might say, “No thank you, I refuse.”
  • In a negotiation, if you reject a proposal, you might say, “I refuse to accept those terms.”
  • A person discussing dietary restrictions might say, “I refuse to eat anything with gluten because of my allergies.”

8. Dismiss

To disregard or ignore something or someone. “Dismiss” is a term often used to indicate a lack of acceptance or approval.

  • For example, if someone presents an idea in a meeting and it is not considered, you might say, “They dismissed my proposal without giving it a fair chance.”
  • In a court case, if a judge decides not to consider a piece of evidence, they might say, “I dismiss this evidence as irrelevant.”
  • A teacher might say to a misbehaving student, “I will not tolerate your behavior. I dismiss you from my classroom.”

9. Neg

To reject or refuse something. “Neg” is a slang term often used in informal or casual conversations.

  • For instance, if someone asks you for a favor and you decline, you might say, “Sorry, I have to neg on that.”
  • In a group setting, if someone suggests a plan and you disagree, you might say, “I neg that idea. Let’s think of something else.”
  • A friend might say, “I neg on going to the party tonight. I’m not in the mood.”

10. Scrap

To discard or get rid of something. “Scrap” is a slang term often used to indicate a decision to not accept or keep something.

  • For example, if someone suggests a project idea and it is not considered, you might say, “Let’s scrap that idea and start fresh.”
  • In a business context, if a product or service is no longer profitable, a company might decide to scrap it.
  • A person discussing a failed relationship might say, “We decided to scrap our plans for the future and go our separate ways.”

11. Diss

To disrespect or reject someone or something. “Diss” is a slang term used to describe when someone criticizes or dismisses another person or their ideas.

  • For example, “He dissed my outfit and said it looked terrible.”
  • In a rap battle, one artist might diss another by insulting their skills or personal life.
  • A person might say, “Don’t diss her, she’s worked really hard on that project.”

12. Shoot down

To reject or dismiss an idea or proposal. “Shoot down” is a slang term used to describe when someone quickly and decisively rejects something.

  • For instance, “He shot down my suggestion without even considering it.”
  • In a meeting, one person might say, “Let’s not shoot down every idea without discussing its potential.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you please not shoot down my plans before giving them a chance?”

13. Knock back

To refuse or reject something. “Knock back” is a slang term used to describe when someone declines an offer or invitation.

  • For example, “He knocked back the job offer because it didn’t align with his career goals.”
  • At a party, someone might say, “I knocked back a few drinks because I had to drive home.”
  • A person might advise, “If you’re not interested, just knock it back politely.”

14. Give the thumbs down

To express disapproval or reject something. “Give the thumbs down” is a slang term used to describe when someone shows their disapproval or refusal.

  • For instance, “The audience gave the thumbs down to the performer’s new song.”
  • In a voting process, someone might say, “I gave the thumbs down to that proposal because it lacked feasibility.”
  • A person might ask, “Did you see the reviews? They’re giving the thumbs down to the new restaurant.”

15. Give the red light

To veto or reject something. “Give the red light” is a slang term used to describe when someone denies approval or permission.

  • For example, “The manager gave the red light to the project because it exceeded the budget.”
  • In a relationship, one partner might say, “I gave the red light to him going out with his friends every night.”
  • A person might advise, “If your parents give the red light to the trip, respect their decision.”

16. Give the cold shoulder

To intentionally ignore or reject someone, often as a way of expressing disapproval or showing disinterest. The phrase “give the cold shoulder” implies giving someone a cold and unwelcoming reception.

  • For example, “After the argument, she gave him the cold shoulder and refused to speak to him.”
  • In a social setting, someone might say, “I tried to start a conversation with her, but she gave me the cold shoulder.”
  • If someone asks for a favor and you refuse without explanation, they might feel like you’re giving them the cold shoulder.
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17. Give the brush-off

To dismiss or reject someone abruptly or rudely. The phrase “give the brush-off” implies brushing someone away as if they were an annoyance or inconvenience.

  • For instance, “He asked her out on a date, but she gave him the brush-off.”
  • If someone tries to start a conversation with you and you respond with a short and dismissive answer, they might feel like they’ve been given the brush-off.
  • When someone asks for your help and you respond with indifference or disinterest, they might interpret it as the brush-off.

18. Give the heave-ho

To forcefully remove someone from a place or situation, or to reject them outright. The phrase “give the heave-ho” implies physically or metaphorically pushing someone away.

  • For example, “The bouncer gave the rowdy patron the heave-ho and kicked him out of the bar.”
  • If someone is no longer welcome in a group or organization, they might say, “They gave me the heave-ho from the club.”
  • When someone is fired from their job, they might jokingly say, “I got the heave-ho from my boss today.”

19. Give the kibosh

To put an end to something or reject it decisively. The phrase “give the kibosh” implies stopping or ending something abruptly.

  • For instance, “They gave the kibosh to the project after realizing it wasn’t feasible.”
  • If someone suggests an idea and you respond with a firm refusal, they might feel like you’ve given it the kibosh.
  • When plans or proposals are rejected without further consideration, they can be said to have been given the kibosh.

20. Give the no-go

To refuse or deny permission for something to happen or take place. The phrase “give the no-go” implies declaring that something is not allowed or cannot proceed.

  • For example, “The boss gave the no-go for the team to take a day off.”
  • If someone asks for your approval and you respond with a clear refusal, they might say, “They gave me the no-go on that idea.”
  • When an event or plan is canceled or prohibited, it can be described as having been given the no-go.

21. Spurn

To spurn means to reject or refuse something or someone with disdain or contempt. It implies a strong rejection and often conveys a sense of superiority or arrogance.

  • For example, “She spurned his romantic advances, making it clear she had no interest in him.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “The company spurned the offer, deeming it too low and not worth considering.”
  • A person might spurn an invitation to a party, saying, “I have better things to do than attend that boring event.”

22. Pass on

To pass on something means to decline or refuse it. It can be used in various contexts and implies a polite or casual rejection without any negative connotations.

  • For instance, “I’ll pass on dessert, thanks. I’m trying to eat healthier.”
  • In a conversation about a job offer, someone might say, “After careful consideration, I decided to pass on the opportunity.”
  • A person might pass on attending a social gathering, saying, “I’m not really in the mood for a party tonight.”

23. Say no

To say no simply means to refuse or decline something. It is a straightforward and direct way to express a lack of acceptance or agreement.

  • For example, “He asked her out on a date, but she said no.”
  • In a negotiation, someone might say, “We appreciate the offer, but we have to say no.”
  • A person might say no to a request for help, stating, “I’m sorry, but I can’t assist you with that.”

24. Brush off

To brush off means to dismiss or ignore something or someone, often in a casual or nonchalant manner. It implies a lack of interest or importance.

  • For instance, “He tried to talk to her, but she brushed him off and walked away.”
  • In a conversation about feedback, someone might say, “I don’t take criticism personally. I just brush it off and focus on improving.”
  • A person might brush off an annoying salesperson, saying, “No thanks, I’m not interested.”

25. Cold-shoulder

To give someone the cold shoulder means to deliberately ignore or snub them, often as a form of punishment or disapproval. It implies a deliberate act of withholding attention or recognition.

  • For example, “She was upset with him, so she gave him the cold shoulder for days.”
  • In a social setting, someone might say, “I don’t know why she’s giving me the cold shoulder. I must have done something to upset her.”
  • A person might receive the cold shoulder from a group of friends, indicating that they are not welcome or accepted.
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26. Shut down

When someone shuts down an idea or suggestion, they refuse to accept or consider it. It can also refer to ending a conversation or argument abruptly.

  • For example, in a meeting, a manager might say, “I’m sorry, but we’re going to shut down that proposal.”
  • In a debate, one person might try to shut down their opponent by saying, “Your argument is completely invalid.”
  • If someone is trying to discuss a sensitive topic and another person doesn’t want to talk about it, they might say, “Let’s just shut this down and move on.”

27. Bounce

To bounce something means to refuse or decline it. It can also refer to ignoring or disregarding something.

  • For instance, if someone offers you a job opportunity and you decline, you might say, “Thanks for the offer, but I’m going to bounce.”
  • If someone suggests an idea that you don’t agree with, you can simply say, “I’m going to bounce that suggestion.”
  • When someone is talking to you about something you’re not interested in, you can say, “Sorry, I’m going to bounce out of this conversation.”

28. Dissent

Dissent means to have a different opinion or to refuse to agree with something. It can also refer to expressing opposition or objection.

  • For example, in a group discussion, if everyone is in favor of a particular decision but you disagree, you can voice your dissent by saying, “I respectfully dissent from this decision.”
  • In a political context, a member of a party might dissent from the majority by voting against a proposed policy.
  • If someone is trying to convince you of something and you don’t agree, you can simply say, “I dissent from your argument.”

29. Refute

To refute means to prove that a statement or argument is incorrect or false. It can also refer to disproving or discrediting something.

  • For instance, if someone makes a claim that you believe is untrue, you can refute it by presenting evidence or logical reasoning.
  • In a debate, one person might refute their opponent’s argument by pointing out flaws or inconsistencies.
  • If someone accuses you of something that you didn’t do, you can refute their accusation by providing an alibi or evidence of your innocence.

30. Disallow

To disallow something means to refuse to permit or accept it. It can also refer to prohibiting or forbidding something.

  • For example, if someone tries to enter a restricted area without proper authorization, they will be disallowed entry.
  • In a game or sport, if a player violates a rule, their actions may be disallowed and result in a penalty.
  • If someone asks for a favor that you cannot grant, you can say, “I’m sorry, but I have to disallow your request.”

31. Dismiss out of hand

To dismiss something out of hand means to reject it without giving it any thought or consideration. It implies a quick and decisive rejection.

  • For example, “The proposal was dismissed out of hand by the board of directors.”
  • A person might say, “I knew my idea would be dismissed out of hand, so I didn’t even bother bringing it up.”
  • In a debate, someone might respond to an argument by saying, “I’m sorry, but I have to dismiss that out of hand.”

32. Rule out

To rule out something means to exclude it as a possibility or option. It suggests that the decision has been made to not accept or consider that particular thing.

  • For instance, “After careful consideration, we have ruled out that option.”
  • A doctor might say, “Based on the test results, we can rule out that diagnosis.”
  • In a discussion about potential solutions, someone might suggest, “Let’s rule out that approach and focus on other options.”

33. Not buy

To not buy something means to not accept or believe it. It implies skepticism or doubt towards a particular idea or statement.

  • For example, “I’m sorry, but I’m not buying your explanation.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve heard that before, but I’m not buying it this time.”
  • In a debate, someone might respond to a claim by saying, “I’m not buying into that argument.”

34. Not go for

To not go for something means to not accept or agree to it. It suggests a refusal or rejection of a proposition.

  • For instance, “I offered him a deal, but he didn’t go for it.”
  • A person might say, “I appreciate the offer, but I’m not going for it.”
  • In a negotiation, someone might respond to a proposal by saying, “Sorry, but I can’t go for that.”

35. Disapprove

To disapprove means to not approve or accept something. It indicates a negative judgment or opinion towards a particular action or decision.

  • For example, “My parents disapproved of my career choice.”
  • A person might say, “I disapprove of the way they handled the situation.”
  • In a meeting, someone might express their disapproval by saying, “I strongly disapprove of this proposal.”

36. Negate

To nullify or deny the existence, truth, or validity of something. “Negate” is often used to express a strong disagreement or rejection of an idea or statement.

  • For instance, in a debate, one might say, “I negate the opponent’s argument because it is based on faulty data.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, a person might argue, “The evidence clearly negates the notion that human activity is not a major factor.”
  • A person might assert, “I absolutely negate the idea that violence is an effective solution to conflicts.”

37. Repudiate

To reject, disavow, or refuse to accept something. “Repudiate” is often used to express a strong disagreement or disapproval of a belief, action, or statement.

  • For example, in a political context, a candidate might say, “I repudiate the divisive rhetoric of my opponent.”
  • In a personal relationship, one might declare, “I repudiate any form of abuse or mistreatment.”
  • A person might assert, “I repudiate the idea that success is solely determined by wealth and status.”

38. Exclude

To intentionally leave out or keep someone or something out of a group or situation. “Exclude” is often used to express the act of not including someone or something.

  • For instance, in a social gathering, a person might say, “We should exclude negative influences from our circle.”
  • In a discussion about job qualifications, one might argue, “We should not exclude candidates based on their age.”
  • A person might assert, “We should exclude any form of discrimination from our policies.”

39. Ban

To officially or legally forbid or restrict someone or something from being involved in a particular activity or entering a certain place. “Ban” is often used to express the act of prohibiting or outlawing something.

  • For example, in a school, a sign might say, “No cell phones allowed. They are banned.”
  • In a discussion about environmental conservation, one might argue, “Plastic bags should be banned to reduce pollution.”
  • A person might assert, “We should ban hate speech to promote a more inclusive society.”

40. Oppose

To actively disagree with or go against someone or something. “Oppose” is often used to express a strong disagreement or resistance to an idea, policy, or action.

  • For instance, in a political debate, one might say, “I oppose the proposed tax increase because it unfairly burdens the middle class.”
  • In a discussion about social issues, a person might argue, “We should oppose any form of discrimination and fight for equality.”
  • A person might assert, “I strongly oppose the idea that violence is the solution to conflicts.”

41. Disagree

To have a different opinion or viewpoint from someone else. “Disagree” is commonly used to express a lack of acceptance or approval of a particular idea, statement, or action.

  • For example, during a debate, one might say, “I disagree with your argument because…”
  • In a group discussion, a participant might state, “I disagree with the proposed solution because it doesn’t address the root cause.”
  • When discussing a controversial topic, someone might assert, “I strongly disagree with your stance on this issue.”

42. Disavow

To publicly reject or disclaim any association or connection with someone or something. “Disavow” is often used to express a refusal to accept or acknowledge a certain belief, action, or affiliation.

  • For instance, a politician might disavow a controversial statement made by a member of their party.
  • In a legal context, a person might disavow any knowledge of or involvement in a criminal activity.
  • A group might issue a statement to disavow the actions of an individual member who acted against the organization’s values.
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43. Invalidate

To declare or prove something as not valid, acceptable, or binding. “Invalidate” is commonly used to express the act of negating or nullifying the legitimacy or effectiveness of something.

  • For example, a court might invalidate a contract if it is found to be fraudulent.
  • During a discussion, one person might say, “Your argument is based on flawed assumptions, which invalidates your conclusion.”
  • In a debate, a participant might attempt to invalidate their opponent’s evidence by pointing out inconsistencies or biases.

44. Disclaim

To formally or publicly deny any responsibility, ownership, or association with something. “Disclaim” is often used to express a lack of acceptance or acknowledgement of a particular statement, action, or affiliation.

  • For instance, a company might include a disclaimer in its terms and conditions to disclaim liability for any damages.
  • In a conversation, a person might disclaim any knowledge or involvement in a controversial event.
  • A politician might disclaim a statement made by a member of their party to distance themselves from any potential backlash.

45. Renounce

To formally or publicly declare abandonment or rejection of something. “Renounce” is commonly used to express a strong disapproval or refusal to accept a certain belief, title, position, or allegiance.

  • For example, a person might renounce their citizenship of a particular country to become a citizen of another country.
  • In a religious context, someone might renounce their former faith and embrace a new belief system.
  • A political figure might renounce their party affiliation due to disagreements with its policies or actions.

46. Turn away

To refuse or decline something or someone. It can also mean to dismiss or ignore someone or something.

  • For example, “I turned away their offer because it wasn’t what I was looking for.”
  • In a job interview, the employer might turn away a candidate if they don’t meet the qualifications.
  • A person might say, “I turned away from that toxic relationship because it wasn’t healthy for me.”