Top 58 Slang For Not Fair – Meaning & Usage

Life isn’t always fair, and sometimes we need the right words to express our frustrations. In this article, we’ve gathered a collection of the most popular slang terms used to convey the feeling of unfairness. Whether you’re venting to a friend or just need to let off some steam, we’ve got you covered with the perfect phrases to articulate those moments when things just aren’t right. Get ready to level up your slang game and have a blast exploring these expressions!

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1. Rigged

This term is used to describe a situation where the outcome is predetermined or manipulated in a way that is unfair to one party.

  • For example, a person might say, “The game was rigged from the start. There was no way we could win.”
  • In a political context, one might say, “The election was rigged in favor of the incumbent.”
  • A person discussing a rigged competition might comment, “It’s not fair when the judges are biased and the outcome is rigged.”

2. Cheated

To cheat is to act dishonestly or unfairly in order to gain an advantage or deceive someone.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I got caught cheating on the test.”
  • In a relationship, one might say, “He cheated on me with someone else.”
  • A person discussing a rigged game might comment, “They cheated by using hidden cards.”

3. Screwed

This term is used to describe a situation where someone is treated unfairly or taken advantage of.

  • For example, a person might say, “I got screwed over by my boss. I deserved a raise.”
  • In a business context, one might say, “The company screwed me by not paying me for overtime.”
  • A person discussing a rigged system might comment, “The average person is getting screwed while the rich get richer.”

4. Gipped

To gip is to deceive or cheat someone out of something, often through dishonest means.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I feel gipped by the car salesman. He sold me a lemon.”
  • In a negotiation, one might say, “I felt gipped by the other party. They didn’t hold up their end of the deal.”
  • A person discussing a rigged contest might comment, “I feel gipped because the winner was predetermined.”

5. Shafted

To shaft someone is to treat them unfairly or deceive them, often in a way that is harmful or disadvantageous.

  • For example, a person might say, “I got shafted by my landlord. They raised the rent without warning.”
  • In a workplace context, one might say, “I got shafted by my coworker. They took credit for my work.”
  • A person discussing a rigged system might comment, “The average citizen is getting shafted by the government.”

6. Ripped off

To be ripped off means to be cheated or deceived, typically in a financial transaction or exchange. It implies that someone has been unfairly taken advantage of or given less than what they deserved.

  • For example, “I bought this designer bag online, but it turned out to be a fake. I got totally ripped off.”
  • Someone might say, “I paid $100 for this concert ticket, but it turns out it only cost $50. I feel so ripped off.”
  • In a conversation about a bad deal, a person might comment, “Don’t shop at that store, they’ll rip you off.”

7. Swindled

To be swindled means to be deceived or tricked, often in a way that involves money or personal gain. It implies that someone has been cheated or conned out of something they believed to be true or fair.

  • For instance, “He convinced me to invest in his business, but it turned out to be a scam. I feel like I’ve been swindled.”
  • A person might say, “I thought I was buying a genuine Rolex, but it was a cheap knockoff. I got swindled.”
  • In a discussion about online fraud, someone might warn, “Be careful of phishing scams, they’re designed to swindle you out of your personal information.”

8. Bamboozled

To be bamboozled means to be tricked or deceived, often in a way that leaves someone feeling confused or bewildered. It implies that someone has been misled or fooled by someone else’s actions or words.

  • For example, “I thought I was signing up for a free trial, but they charged my credit card. I feel completely bamboozled.”
  • Someone might say, “I fell for their sales pitch, but the product didn’t live up to its promises. I’ve been bamboozled.”
  • In a conversation about a misleading advertisement, a person might comment, “Don’t be fooled by their claims, they’re just trying to bamboozle you.”

9. Hoodwinked

To be hoodwinked means to be deceived or tricked, often in a way that involves being led to believe something that is not true. It implies that someone has been fooled or duped by someone else’s actions or words.

  • For instance, “They told me this car was in perfect condition, but it broke down the next day. I’ve been hoodwinked.”
  • A person might say, “I thought I was getting a great deal, but it turned out to be a scam. I feel like I’ve been hoodwinked.”
  • In a discussion about deceptive sales tactics, someone might warn, “Watch out for that salesman, he’s known for hoodwinking customers.”

10. Shortchanged

To be shortchanged means to be given less than what is deserved or expected, often in a financial or transactional context. It implies that someone has been unfairly treated or received less than their fair share.

  • For example, “I worked overtime, but my boss only paid me for regular hours. I feel like I’ve been shortchanged.”
  • Someone might say, “I ordered a large pizza, but they gave me a small. I’ve been shortchanged.”
  • In a conversation about a disappointing service, a person might comment, “The portion sizes at that restaurant are so small, you always feel shortchanged.”

11. Jobbed

To be “jobbed” means to be cheated or deceived in a situation where fairness or honesty is expected. It can refer to being treated unfairly or taken advantage of.

  • For example, “I got jobbed out of my promotion by my conniving coworker.”
  • In a sports context, someone might say, “The referee totally jobbed our team with that bad call.”
  • A person might complain, “I feel like I’m always getting jobbed by the system.”

12. Jipped

To be “jipped” means to be ripped off or swindled. It refers to being unfairly treated or deceived in a transaction or exchange.

  • For instance, “I got jipped when I bought this counterfeit designer bag.”
  • Someone might say, “Don’t get jipped by that shady car salesman.”
  • A person might warn, “Be careful not to get jipped when shopping online.”

13. Scammed

To be “scammed” means to be deceived or tricked into giving away money or personal information. It refers to being intentionally defrauded or conned.

  • For example, “I got scammed when I fell for that email phishing scam.”
  • A person might say, “Watch out for online scams that promise quick money.”
  • Someone might warn, “Don’t get scammed by those fake tech support calls.”

14. Conned

To be “conned” means to be tricked or deceived in a way that involves dishonesty or manipulation. It refers to being swindled or exploited.

  • For instance, “I was conned into buying a fake painting by a smooth-talking art dealer.”
  • Someone might say, “Don’t let yourself be conned by those persuasive salespeople.”
  • A person might warn, “Be cautious of con artists who prey on vulnerable individuals.”

15. Fleeced

To be “fleeced” means to be exploited or taken advantage of financially. It refers to being swindled or cheated out of money.

  • For example, “I felt like I was fleeced when I paid way too much for that concert ticket.”
  • A person might say, “Be careful not to get fleeced by those dishonest contractors.”
  • Someone might complain, “I can’t believe I got fleeced by that smooth-talking salesman.”

16. Snookered

To be snookered means to be tricked or deceived, often in a way that is unfair or dishonest.

  • For example, “I thought I was getting a great deal on that car, but I got snookered by the salesman.”
  • In a game of pool, if your opponent sets you up in a position where you have no good shots, you might say, “I’ve been snookered!”
  • Someone might say, “Don’t let yourself get snookered by those smooth-talking salespeople.”

17. Shammed

To be shammed means to be faked or pretended, usually in a way that is unfair or deceitful.

  • For instance, “He claimed to be a doctor, but it turns out he was shammed.”
  • If someone pretends to be sick to get out of work, you might say, “Don’t be shammed by their excuses.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe she shammed her way into that job.”

18. Flimflammed

To be flimflammed means to be deceived or swindled, typically in a way that is unfair or dishonest.

  • For example, “I invested in that company and got flimflammed out of my money.”
  • If someone sells you a fake product, you might say, “I can’t believe I got flimflammed.”
  • A person might warn others, “Watch out for those flimflam artists trying to take advantage of you.”

19. Hornswoggled

To be hornswoggled means to be tricked or duped, often in a way that is unfair or sneaky.

  • For instance, “I thought I was buying a genuine antique, but I was hornswoggled.”
  • If someone convinces you to do something against your better judgment, you might say, “Don’t let yourself get hornswoggled.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe I let myself get hornswoggled by their smooth talk.”

20. Cozened

To be cozened means to be deceived or conned, usually in a way that is unfair or manipulative.

  • For example, “She cozened me into giving her money for a fake charity.”
  • If someone tricks you into doing something you didn’t want to do, you might say, “I’ve been cozened.”
  • A person might warn others, “Be careful not to be cozened by their promises of easy money.”

21. Chiseled

To be chiseled means to be cheated or deceived in a dishonest or unfair manner. It is often used to describe situations where someone is taken advantage of or swindled.

  • For example, “I got chiseled out of my money by that scam artist.”
  • Someone might say, “He chiseled me out of the promotion I deserved.”
  • In a discussion about unfair business practices, a person might mention, “Customers are often chiseled by hidden fees and charges.”

22. Bilked

To be bilked means to be deceived or defrauded out of money or property. It implies that someone has been cheated or conned in a dishonest manner.

  • For instance, “I was bilked out of my life savings by a fraudulent investment scheme.”
  • A person might say, “He bilked me out of my inheritance.”
  • In a conversation about online scams, someone might warn, “Be careful not to get bilked by phishing emails.”

23. Gypped

To be gypped means to be cheated or swindled, originating from the derogatory term “gypsy” which perpetuated stereotypes about the Roma people. It is important to note that this term is considered offensive and should be avoided.

  • For example, “I feel gypped by the unfair pricing of this product.”
  • Someone might say, “They gypped me out of my rightful share of the profits.”
  • In a discussion about equal opportunities, a person might argue, “Minorities are often gypped out of the same opportunities as others.”

24. Fiddled

To be fiddled means to be tampered with or manipulated in an unfair or dishonest way. It implies that something has been altered or adjusted to gain an advantage or deceive others.

  • For instance, “The election results were fiddled with to favor a certain candidate.”
  • A person might say, “He fiddled with the numbers to make the company’s financials look better.”
  • In a conversation about cheating in sports, someone might mention, “Athletes who fiddle with the rules undermine the integrity of the game.”

25. Unjust

Unjust refers to something that is not fair or equitable. It implies that a decision, action, or situation lacks justice or fairness.

  • For example, “The punishment was unjust considering the circumstances.”
  • A person might say, “The legal system can sometimes be unjust.”
  • In a discussion about social inequality, someone might argue, “The distribution of wealth in our society is unjust.”

26. Crooked

This term is often used to describe someone who is deceitful or engages in unethical behavior. It can also refer to a situation that is unfair or rigged in someone’s favor.

  • For example, “That politician is so crooked, you can’t trust anything they say.”
  • In a conversation about a rigged game, someone might say, “The whole system is crooked, there’s no way to win.”
  • Another might comment, “It’s not fair that some people have to play by the rules while others get away with being crooked.”

27. Unjustified

This term describes something that lacks a valid or logical reason. It implies that a decision or action is not fair or reasonable.

  • For instance, “The teacher’s punishment was unjustified, as the student did nothing wrong.”
  • In a discussion about a company’s layoffs, someone might say, “The layoffs were unjustified, as the employees were performing well.”
  • Another might argue, “It’s not fair to make unjustified accusations without any evidence.”

28. Unbalanced

This term refers to a situation that lacks fairness or equality. It can describe an uneven distribution of resources, power, or opportunities.

  • For example, “The distribution of wealth in our society is unbalanced and unfair.”
  • In a conversation about a sports team, someone might say, “The game is unbalanced because one team has all the star players.”
  • Another might comment, “It’s not fair that some people have access to quality education while others are left with unbalanced opportunities.”

29. Unreasonable

This term describes something that is not based on logic or common sense. It implies that a decision or expectation is not fair or realistic.

  • For instance, “The boss’s demands are unreasonable, as they expect us to work 12-hour days.”
  • In a discussion about a price increase, someone might say, “The new prices are unreasonable, as they are much higher than the value of the product.”
  • Another might argue, “It’s not fair to have unreasonable expectations of someone’s abilities.”

30. Unjustifiable

This term refers to something that cannot be justified or explained in a fair or logical manner. It implies that a decision or action is without a valid reason.

  • For example, “The company’s decision to lay off employees is unjustifiable, as the business is profitable.”
  • In a conversation about a punishment, someone might say, “The severity of the punishment is unjustifiable for such a minor offense.”
  • Another might comment, “It’s not fair to have unjustifiable rules that restrict people’s freedom.”

31. Unethical

This term describes behavior or actions that go against accepted moral principles or standards. It implies a lack of integrity or honesty.

  • For example, “It’s unethical to cheat on a test.”
  • In a discussion about business practices, someone might say, “Using child labor is highly unethical.”
  • A person might argue, “It’s unethical for doctors to prioritize profits over patient care.”

32. Unscrupulous

This word refers to someone who is willing to act dishonestly or unethically in order to achieve their goals. It implies a lack of moral principles or integrity.

  • For instance, “He’s an unscrupulous businessman who will do anything to make a profit.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “Many politicians are unscrupulous and only care about staying in power.”
  • A person might warn, “Be careful when dealing with unscrupulous individuals who might try to take advantage of you.”

33. Unprincipled

This term describes someone who does not adhere to or follow moral principles or standards. It implies a lack of integrity or ethical behavior.

  • For example, “He’s an unprincipled politician who will say anything to win votes.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “Cheating is a sign of being unprincipled.”
  • A person might argue, “Unprincipled individuals often prioritize their own interests over the well-being of others.”

34. Unrighteous

This word describes actions or behavior that is not fair or morally right. It implies a lack of justice or righteousness.

  • For instance, “The decision to deny him a fair trial was unrighteous.”
  • In a discussion about social issues, someone might say, “Systemic racism is an unrighteous practice.”
  • A person might argue, “Unrighteous laws and policies perpetuate inequality and injustice.”

35. Unjustly

This term describes actions or treatment that is not fair or just. It implies a lack of justice or fairness.

  • For example, “He was unjustly accused of a crime he didn’t commit.”
  • In a discussion about workplace discrimination, someone might say, “Many employees are unjustly treated based on their race or gender.”
  • A person might argue, “Unjustly punishing innocent people undermines the credibility of the justice system.”

36. Unfairly

This word is used to describe a situation or action that is not fair or just. It implies that someone has been treated in a biased or unjust manner.

  • For example, “He was unfairly treated by his boss and denied a promotion.”
  • In a sports context, one might say, “The referee made several unfair calls during the game.”
  • A student might complain, “The teacher graded my paper unfairly and gave me a lower score than I deserved.”

37. Bogus

This word is used to describe something that is not genuine or authentic. It implies that something is false or deceptive.

  • For instance, “He tried to sell me a bogus Rolex watch that turned out to be a cheap imitation.”
  • In a conversation about scams, one might say, “Don’t fall for those bogus online advertisements.”
  • A person might describe a misleading news article as, “That story is totally bogus.”

38. Rotten

This word is used to describe something that is morally corrupt or unfair. It implies a sense of decay or deterioration.

  • For example, “The company’s management was involved in some rotten business practices.”
  • In a discussion about politics, one might say, “There’s a lot of rotten corruption in the government.”
  • A person might express frustration by saying, “Life can be so rotten sometimes.”

39. Shady

This word is used to describe someone or something that is suspicious or dishonest. It implies a lack of trustworthiness or integrity.

  • For instance, “I don’t trust that shady character hanging around the corner.”
  • In a conversation about business deals, one might say, “Be careful, that deal seems a bit shady.”
  • A person might describe a dubious website as, “I stumbled upon a shady website that asked for my personal information.”

40. Fishy

This word is used to describe something that seems suspicious or questionable. It implies a sense of doubt or skepticism.

  • For example, “The whole situation seems fishy to me. I think there’s more to the story.”
  • In a discussion about a strange occurrence, one might say, “Something fishy is going on here.”
  • A person might express suspicion by saying, “His excuse for being late sounds fishy.”

41. Sketchy

This term is used to describe something or someone that seems shady or untrustworthy. It implies a lack of honesty or integrity.

  • For example, “That guy selling knockoff watches seems really sketchy.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t trust that website, it looks sketchy.”
  • In a conversation about a suspicious activity, someone might comment, “That deal sounds really sketchy, I wouldn’t get involved.”

42. Sleazy

This word is used to describe something or someone that is low-class, lacking in morals, or generally distasteful.

  • For instance, “He hangs out at that sleazy bar down the street.”
  • A person might say, “That politician is known for his sleazy tactics.”
  • In a discussion about a scandalous situation, someone might comment, “The whole affair has a sleazy vibe to it.”

43. Underhanded

This term is used to describe actions or behavior that is sneaky, unfair, or not straightforward.

  • For example, “He used underhanded tactics to win the competition.”
  • A person might say, “That was a really underhanded move, I can’t believe they did that.”
  • In a conversation about a manipulative person, someone might comment, “Watch out for her, she’s known for her underhanded ways.”

44. Dirty

This word is used to describe actions, behavior, or situations that are unethical, unfair, or dishonest.

  • For instance, “He played dirty to win the game.”
  • A person might say, “That’s a dirty trick, you shouldn’t stoop to that level.”
  • In a discussion about a corrupt business practice, someone might comment, “The company’s dirty dealings have been exposed.”

45. Out of line

This phrase is used to describe behavior that is unacceptable, disrespectful, or goes beyond what is considered reasonable or fair.

  • For example, “His comments were completely out of line.”
  • A person might say, “That’s really out of line, you shouldn’t say something like that.”
  • In a conversation about a rude action, someone might comment, “She crossed the line with her behavior, it was completely out of line.”

46. Not cricket

This phrase is often used to describe something that is not fair or honest. It originates from the sport of cricket, where fair play and adherence to the rules are highly valued.

  • For example, “Changing the rules halfway through the game is just not cricket.”
  • A person might say, “It’s not cricket to take credit for someone else’s work.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial decision, someone might comment, “That ruling was definitely not cricket.”

47. Foul play

This term refers to any behavior that is considered unfair or dishonest. It is often used in the context of sports or games, but can also be applied to other situations.

  • For instance, “There was definitely some foul play going on during the match.”
  • A person might say, “Accusing someone without evidence is foul play.”
  • In a discussion about a political scandal, someone might comment, “The investigation revealed clear evidence of foul play.”

48. Low-down

This slang term is used to describe something that is unfair or dishonest. It implies that the behavior or action is morally wrong or deceitful.

  • For example, “Spreading rumors about someone is really low-down.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe he did something so low-down.”
  • In a discussion about a cheating scandal, someone might comment, “The players involved showed a complete lack of integrity. It was a low-down move.”

49. Sneaky

This word is used to describe someone or something that is behaving in a deceptive or unfair manner. It implies a sense of cunning or slyness.

  • For instance, “He’s always coming up with sneaky ways to get what he wants.”
  • A person might say, “That was a sneaky move on their part.”
  • In a discussion about a business deal, someone might comment, “The other party tried to pull a sneaky trick, but we caught them in the act.”

50. Devious

This term is used to describe someone who is behaving in a cunning and dishonest manner. It implies a sense of trickery or manipulation.

  • For example, “She’s known for her devious tactics to get ahead.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t trust someone who is always so devious.”
  • In a discussion about a political maneuver, someone might comment, “The politician’s devious plan was exposed.”

51. Slick

This term is often used to describe someone or something that is not fair or honest in their actions or behavior. It implies a level of cunning and deceit.

  • For example, “That slick salesman convinced me to buy a faulty product.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “The politician’s slick tactics are not fair to the voters.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a company that uses misleading advertising, saying, “Their slick marketing campaign is designed to trick customers.”

52. Slimy

This slang term is used to describe behavior that is not fair, honest, or trustworthy. It often implies a sense of sliminess or discomfort.

  • For instance, “He used slimy tactics to win the game.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “She broke up with him because of his slimy behavior.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a business practice that is unethical or exploitative, saying, “Their slimy business practices take advantage of vulnerable customers.”

53. Cutthroat

This term is often used to describe a situation or competition where people are willing to do anything to succeed, even if it means being unfair or ruthless.

  • For example, “The cutthroat world of business doesn’t always reward fairness.”
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might say, “The team played a cutthroat game, resorting to dirty tactics.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a workplace environment that is highly competitive and lacks fairness, saying, “The office is a cutthroat environment where everyone is out for themselves.”

54. Inequitable

This term is used to describe a situation or system that is not fair or just. It implies a lack of equality or fairness.

  • For instance, “The distribution of resources in the country is inequitable.”
  • In a conversation about education, someone might say, “The current system is inequitable, with some students receiving better opportunities than others.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a decision or policy that disproportionately affects certain groups, saying, “The new law is inequitable and discriminates against marginalized communities.”

55. Discriminatory

This term is used to describe behavior, policies, or actions that unfairly treat certain individuals or groups based on characteristics such as race, gender, or religion.

  • For example, “The company’s hiring practices are discriminatory and favor certain demographics.”
  • In a discussion about social justice, someone might say, “Discriminatory laws perpetuate systemic inequality.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a school policy that unfairly targets students from marginalized backgrounds, saying, “The dress code is discriminatory and enforces harmful stereotypes.”

56. Partial

This term refers to a situation or decision that shows favoritism or prejudice towards one side or party. It implies that fairness is not being upheld.

  • For example, in a sports match, someone might say, “The referee’s calls were partial towards the home team.”
  • In a discussion about politics, a person might argue, “The media coverage of the election was clearly partial and influenced the outcome.”
  • A student might complain, “The teacher’s grading seems partial and inconsistent.”

57. Prejudiced

This term describes a biased or unfair attitude or behavior towards a particular group or individual based on preconceived notions or stereotypes.

  • For instance, someone might say, “His prejudiced remarks were offensive and hurtful.”
  • In a discussion about diversity, a person might assert, “We need to address the prejudiced beliefs that perpetuate inequality.”
  • A news article might report, “The company’s hiring practices were found to be prejudiced against certain ethnicities.”

58. Unequal

This term refers to a lack of equality or fairness in a particular situation or system.

  • For example, in a debate about wealth distribution, someone might argue, “The unequal distribution of resources is inherently unfair.”
  • In a discussion about education, a person might point out, “There are unequal opportunities for students based on their socioeconomic background.”
  • A worker might complain, “The pay scale in this company is unequal and favors certain positions.”
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