Top 20 Slang For Not Important – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to everyday conversations, sometimes we need a quick and easy way to convey that something isn’t important. Whether you’re chatting with friends or sending a text, having the right slang term can come in handy. Our team has put together a list of the top slang expressions that can help you express this sentiment effortlessly. So, if you’re ready to up your casual conversation game, stay tuned for our compilation of slang for not important.

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1. Meh

This term is used to express a lack of interest or enthusiasm towards something. It conveys a feeling of apathy or indifference.

  • For example, when asked about their opinion on a movie, someone might respond, “Meh, it was alright.”
  • In a discussion about a new restaurant, a person might say, “I tried it, but the food was meh.”
  • Another might comment on a boring party, “The music was meh, and the atmosphere was dull.”

2. Whatever

This word is often used to dismiss or show a lack of concern towards a matter. It implies a sense of indifference or not caring.

  • For instance, when someone suggests a plan that you’re not interested in, you might respond with, “Whatever, I don’t really care.”
  • In a disagreement, one person might say, “You can think whatever you want, but I know I’m right.”
  • Another might use it to brush off criticism, saying, “Their opinion doesn’t matter to me. Whatever.”

3. Meh-rathon

This term is a combination of “meh” and “marathon” and is used to describe an extended period of time where everything feels uninteresting or unimportant.

  • For example, during a boring week at work, someone might say, “It’s been a meh-rathon of uneventful days.”
  • In a conversation about a monotonous routine, a person might comment, “My life lately has been a meh-rathon of the same old, same old.”
  • Another might describe a lackluster vacation, saying, “The trip turned into a meh-rathon of tourist traps and disappointing sights.”

4. Meh-some

This term is a blend of “meh” and “awesome” and is used to describe something that is neither great nor terrible, but rather falls in the middle.

  • For instance, when asked about a movie, someone might say, “It was meh-some, not amazing but not terrible either.”
  • In a discussion about a concert, a person might comment, “The band’s performance was meh-some, not their best but still enjoyable.”
  • Another might describe a book as “meh-some,“meh-some,” meaning it was okay but not particularly memorable.

5. Meh-tastic

This term combines “meh” and “fantastic” to describe something that is underwhelming or lackluster, but with a touch of irony or exaggerated emphasis.

  • For example, when someone asks about a meal at a new restaurant, you might reply, “It was meh-tastic, nothing special but the prices were outrageous.”
  • In a discussion about a disappointing event, a person might say, “The party was meh-tastic, with dull music and a lack of atmosphere.”
  • Another might describe a mediocre performance as “meh-tastic,“meh-tastic,” meaning it was neither good nor bad, but with a humorous twist.
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6. Meh-gative

This term is used to describe something that is neither positive nor negative, but rather has a neutral or indifferent feeling. It is often used to express apathy or lack of interest in a particular thing or situation.

  • For example, if someone asks, “What do you think of the new movie?” and you respond with “Meh-gative,” it means you don’t really have strong feelings about it either way.
  • In a discussion about a restaurant, someone might say, “The food was meh-gative, not great but not terrible.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a boring or uneventful day by saying, “Today was pretty meh-gative, nothing exciting happened.”

7. Meh-sential

This term is a combination of “meh” and “essential” and is used to describe something that is considered necessary or important, but not particularly exciting or interesting. It implies that the thing in question is required or needed, but doesn’t elicit strong enthusiasm or excitement.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Do you want to go to the party?” and you respond with “Meh-sential,” it means you feel obligated to go, even though you’re not particularly excited about it.
  • In a conversation about a mandatory work training, someone might say, “It’s meh-sential that we attend, even though it’s not very exciting.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a task that needs to be done, but isn’t enjoyable, by saying, “Cleaning the house is meh-sential, but not exactly fun.”

8. Meh-nor

This term combines “meh” and “minor” to describe something that is of little importance or significance. It suggests that the thing in question is not worth much attention or consideration.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Did you hear about the minor accident?” and you respond with “Meh-nor,” it means you don’t really care or think it’s a big deal.
  • In a discussion about a small mistake, someone might say, “It was a meh-nor error, nothing to worry about.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a trivial issue or concern by saying, “I have some meh-nor problems to deal with, nothing major.”

9. Meh-spect

This term is a combination of “meh” and “respect” and is used to describe a lack of admiration or regard for something. It implies that the thing in question doesn’t deserve much attention or consideration.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “What do you think of their performance?” and you respond with “Meh-spect,” it means you don’t have much respect or admiration for it.
  • In a conversation about a mediocre achievement, someone might say, “I have meh-spect for their accomplishment, but it’s not particularly impressive.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a lackluster performance or effort by saying, “Their work was meh-spect, nothing special.”

10. Meh-ssential

This term combines “meh” and “essential” to describe something that is considered necessary or important, but doesn’t elicit much enthusiasm or excitement. It suggests that the thing in question is required or needed, but doesn’t hold much value or interest.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you want to go to the meeting?” and you respond with “Meh-ssential,” it means you feel obligated to attend, but you’re not particularly excited about it.
  • In a discussion about a mandatory class, someone might say, “It’s meh-ssential that we take it, even though it’s not very engaging.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a necessary but unexciting task by saying, “Filing paperwork is meh-ssential, but not exactly thrilling.”

11. Meh-ndane

This term combines the word “meh,” which expresses indifference or lack of enthusiasm, with the word “mundane,” meaning ordinary or dull. It is used to describe something that is not important or exciting.

  • For example, “I had to sit through a meh-ndane lecture on budgeting.”
  • A person might say, “The movie was so meh-ndane, I fell asleep halfway through.”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, someone might dismissively say, “I’ll probably just do some meh-ndane chores around the house.”

12. Meh-rginal

This term combines the word “meh,” which expresses indifference or lack of enthusiasm, with the word “marginal,” meaning not important or significant. It is used to describe something that is not worth paying much attention to.

  • For instance, “The book received meh-rginal reviews and didn’t make much of an impact.”
  • A person might say, “I tried that new restaurant, but the food was meh-rginal at best.”
  • In a discussion about fashion trends, someone might comment, “That style is so meh-rginal, it’ll be out of fashion by next season.”

13. Trivial

This term refers to something that is of little importance or significance. It is used to describe something that is not worth much attention or consideration.

  • For example, “I don’t want to waste time on trivial matters.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s focus on the important issues and not get caught up in trivial details.”
  • In a conversation about a game, someone might comment, “The scoring system is so trivial, it doesn’t really affect the outcome.”

14. Insignificant

This term describes something that is not important or meaningful. It is used to emphasize that something is not worth much attention or consideration.

  • For instance, “Don’t worry about that insignificant problem, it’s not worth your time.”
  • A person might say, “In the grand scheme of things, that issue is insignificant.”
  • In a discussion about achievements, someone might comment, “That award is insignificant compared to their other accomplishments.”

15. Negligible

This term refers to something that is so small or unimportant that it is not worth considering or taking into account. It emphasizes the lack of significance or impact.

  • For example, “The difference in price is negligible, so just choose the option you prefer.”
  • A person might say, “The effect of that change on the overall outcome is negligible.”
  • In a conversation about risks, someone might comment, “The chances of that happening are negligible, so don’t worry too much.”

16. Frivolous

This word refers to something that is not serious or important. It implies that the matter is lacking in significance or weight.

  • For example, “She spent her time on frivolous pursuits instead of focusing on her studies.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might say, “Cutting out frivolous expenses can help save money.”
  • A person might describe a decision as frivolous, saying, “I made a frivolous purchase and now regret it.”

17. Unimportant

This word describes something that lacks importance or relevance. It suggests that the matter is not worthy of attention or consideration.

  • For instance, “The minor details are unimportant in the grand scheme of things.”
  • In a conversation about priorities, someone might say, “Let’s focus on what’s important and not get caught up in unimportant details.”
  • A person might dismiss a suggestion as unimportant, saying, “That’s an unimportant factor in our decision-making process.”

18. Measly

This word is used to describe something that is small, insignificant, or of little value. It conveys a sense of disappointment or dissatisfaction with the amount or quality of something.

  • For example, “He received a measly paycheck for all his hard work.”
  • In a discussion about portion sizes, someone might say, “The restaurant served a measly portion of fries.”
  • A person might express frustration with a small gift, saying, “I expected more than this measly present.”

19. Inconsequential

This word describes something that is not important or significant. It suggests that the matter has little or no impact or consequence.

  • For instance, “The minor details are inconsequential in the overall outcome.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “That point is inconsequential to the main argument.”
  • A person might dismiss a rumor as inconsequential, saying, “It’s just gossip and has no real effect on our lives.”

20. Worthless

This word is used to describe something that has no worth or value. It implies that the matter is completely devoid of significance or usefulness.

  • For example, “The broken gadget is now worthless and cannot be repaired.”
  • In a discussion about investments, someone might say, “That stock turned out to be worthless.”
  • A person might express frustration with a useless item, saying, “I can’t believe I wasted money on this worthless product.”