Top 74 Slang For Not Right – Meaning & Usage

When things just don’t feel quite right, sometimes regular words just don’t cut it. That’s where slang for “not right” comes into play. Whether you’re feeling off, weird, or just a bit wonky, our team has got you covered with a list of trendy phrases that capture that feeling perfectly. Stay tuned to level up your slang game and express those moments when things just aren’t clicking.

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1. Sketchy

This word is used to describe something or someone that appears untrustworthy or unreliable. It implies that there may be something wrong or dishonest about the situation.

  • For example, “That guy’s business deal seems sketchy. I wouldn’t trust him.”
  • In a discussion about a dubious website, someone might say, “I wouldn’t buy anything from that site, it looks sketchy.”
  • A person might warn their friend, “Be careful, that neighborhood is known for its sketchy characters.”

2. Fishy

This slang term is used to describe something that seems suspicious or questionable. It implies that there may be hidden motives or deceit involved.

  • For instance, “The whole situation feels fishy. I think there’s more going on than meets the eye.”
  • If someone is acting strangely, you might say, “He’s acting really fishy. I don’t trust him.”
  • In a discussion about a suspicious email, someone might comment, “That email seems fishy. I wouldn’t click on any links.”

3. Shady

This word is used to describe something or someone that is shady, meaning they are dishonest or untrustworthy. It suggests that there is something hidden or secretive about the situation.

  • For example, “I don’t like that guy, he seems really shady.”
  • If someone is involved in questionable activities, you might say, “He’s got a shady past.”
  • In a discussion about a dubious business, someone might comment, “That company has a shady reputation. I wouldn’t do business with them.”

4. Off

This word is used to describe something that is not quite right or seems suspicious. It suggests that there is something wrong or unusual about the situation.

  • For instance, “There’s something off about that person. I can’t put my finger on it.”
  • If a situation doesn’t feel right, you might say, “Something seems off about this.”
  • In a discussion about a strange occurrence, someone might comment, “That’s really off. I’ve never seen anything like it.”

5. Dodgy

This slang term is used to describe something or someone that is questionable or unreliable. It implies that there may be something dishonest or suspect about the situation.

  • For example, “I wouldn’t trust that dodgy website. It looks sketchy.”
  • If someone is acting suspiciously, you might say, “He’s being really dodgy. I don’t know what he’s up to.”
  • In a discussion about a dubious deal, someone might comment, “That sounds dodgy to me. I wouldn’t get involved.”

6. Wack

This term is used to describe something that is strange, weird, or not right. It can also be used to express disappointment or disapproval.

  • For example, “That movie was wack, I couldn’t follow the plot at all.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe she did that, it’s so wack.”
  • Another might comment, “The weather is wack today, it’s sunny one minute and raining the next.”

7. Janky

This slang term refers to something that is poorly made, in bad condition, or not functioning properly. It can also be used to describe a person or situation that is sketchy or suspicious.

  • For instance, “I bought this janky phone and it stopped working after a week.”
  • A person might say, “That car looks janky, I wouldn’t trust it.”
  • Another might comment, “The website’s design is so janky, it’s hard to navigate.”

8. Hinky

This word is used to describe something that seems suspicious, odd, or not quite right. It can also be used to express a feeling of unease or discomfort.

  • For example, “There’s something hinky about that guy, I don’t trust him.”
  • A person might say, “I had a hinky feeling about the deal, so I backed out.”
  • Another might comment, “The whole situation just feels hinky, I can’t put my finger on it.”

9. Wonky

This term is used to describe something that is unsteady, unpredictable, or not functioning properly. It can also be used to describe a person or situation that is strange or not quite right.

  • For instance, “The table is wonky, it wobbles if you put too much weight on it.”
  • A person might say, “My computer is acting wonky, it keeps freezing.”
  • Another might comment, “Her explanation of what happened sounds wonky, I think she’s hiding something.”

10. Queer

In this context, “queer” is used to describe something that is unusual, odd, or not right. It can also be used to describe a person or situation that is unconventional or outside of societal norms.

  • For example, “That painting is so queer, I can’t understand what it’s supposed to represent.”
  • A person might say, “He has a queer way of dressing, always wearing mismatched clothes.”
  • Another might comment, “The party had a queer vibe, with people dancing in unconventional ways.”

11. Funky

This term is used to describe something that is odd, unusual, or out of the ordinary. It can also refer to something that is not functioning properly.

  • For example, “That shirt you’re wearing is really funky.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t figure out why my computer is acting funky.”
  • In a discussion about music, someone might describe a unique sound as “funky.”

12. Bogus

Bogus is a slang term used to describe something that is not genuine, true, or valid. It can also mean something that is unfair or deceptive.

  • For instance, “The website claimed to offer free products, but it turned out to be bogus.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t believe his story, it’s totally bogus.”
  • In a conversation about a scam, someone might warn, “Watch out for that company, they’re known for their bogus offers.”

13. Skewed

Skewed is a term used to describe something that is not accurate or balanced. It can refer to data that is misrepresented or opinions that are biased.

  • For example, “The study’s results were skewed because of the small sample size.”
  • A person might say, “His perspective on the issue is skewed by his personal experiences.”
  • In a discussion about media bias, someone might argue, “The news outlet’s reporting is clearly skewed towards a certain political agenda.”

14. Cockamamie

Cockamamie is a slang term used to describe something that is silly, foolish, or absurd. It can also mean something that is implausible or unlikely to be true.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe she fell for that cockamamie story.”
  • A person might say, “The plan they came up with is completely cockamamie.”
  • In a conversation about conspiracy theories, someone might dismiss a claim as “cockamamie.”

15. Ratchet

Ratchet is a slang term used to describe something that is messy, disorganized, or of poor quality. It can also refer to a person who is behaving in a vulgar or trashy manner.

  • For example, “Her room is so ratchet, there’s clothes everywhere.”
  • A person might say, “That party was ratchet, there was a lot of drama.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might criticize an outfit as “ratchet.”

16. Busted

This slang term is often used to describe something that is not functioning properly or is in a state of disrepair.

  • For example, “My phone screen is completely busted.”
  • A person might say, “I tried to start my car this morning, but the engine is busted.”
  • In a conversation about a faulty appliance, someone might comment, “The dishwasher is busted again, I’ll have to call a repairman.”

17. Screwed up

This slang term is used to describe something that is not right or is in a state of disarray.

  • For instance, “I really screwed up that presentation.”
  • A person might say, “The restaurant screwed up my order.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s mistake, someone might comment, “He really screwed up by missing that deadline.”

18. Cattywampus

This slang term is often used to describe something that is not straight or aligned correctly.

  • For example, “The picture frame is hanging cattywampus.”
  • A person might say, “The bookshelf is a bit cattywampus, I need to adjust it.”
  • In a conversation about a lopsided painting, someone might comment, “It looks cattywampus, should I fix it?”

19. Crocked

This slang term is used to describe someone who is under the influence of alcohol.

  • For instance, “He got completely crocked at the party last night.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t remember anything from that night, I was too crocked.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s behavior, someone might comment, “She’s always getting crocked at social events.”

20. Shonky

This slang term is often used to describe something that is of poor quality or is not trustworthy.

  • For example, “I bought a shonky used car that broke down after a week.”
  • A person might say, “That website looks shonky, I wouldn’t trust it.”
  • In a conversation about a suspicious business deal, someone might comment, “It seems shonky, I would be cautious before investing.”

21. Mickey Mouse

This term is used to describe something that is not genuine or of low quality. It can also refer to something that is overly simplistic or lacking substance.

  • For example, “That Mickey Mouse operation is never going to succeed.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t waste your time with that Mickey Mouse product.”
  • In a discussion about a poorly organized event, someone might comment, “The whole thing was so Mickey Mouse.”

22. Sketch

This slang term is used to describe something or someone that seems suspicious or shady. It can refer to situations, actions, or individuals that give off a sense of unease or danger.

  • For instance, “That guy hanging around the park seems really sketch.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t trust that sketchy-looking website.”
  • In a conversation about a questionable business deal, someone might comment, “The whole thing sounds really sketch.”

23. Shifty

This term is used to describe someone who is untrustworthy or deceitful. It can refer to individuals who display suspicious behavior or have a reputation for being dishonest.

  • For example, “I wouldn’t lend him money, he’s shifty.”
  • A person might say, “Be careful, that shifty character is known for scamming people.”
  • In a discussion about a person’s questionable actions, someone might comment, “His shifty behavior is raising a lot of red flags.”

24. Foul

This term is used to describe something that is unfair or dishonest. It can refer to actions, situations, or individuals that go against accepted standards of behavior or ethics.

  • For instance, “That was a foul move, you cheated.”
  • A person might say, “The referee made a foul call during the game.”
  • In a conversation about a dishonest business practice, someone might comment, “That company’s actions are really foul.”

25. Dubious

This slang term is used to describe something that is questionable or doubtful. It can refer to situations, claims, or individuals that are not easily believed or trusted.

  • For example, “His excuse for being late seems dubious.”
  • A person might say, “I have my doubts about that dubious investment opportunity.”
  • In a discussion about a suspicious news article, someone might comment, “The credibility of that source is highly dubious.”

26. Rotten

This term is used to describe something that is of poor quality or morally corrupt. It can be used to describe a person, situation, or thing.

  • For example, “That movie was so rotten, I couldn’t even finish watching it.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t believe he cheated on her, what a rotten thing to do.”
  • A person might describe a decaying piece of fruit as “rotten.”
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27. Flaky

This slang term is used to describe someone who is unreliable, inconsistent, or prone to canceling plans at the last minute.

  • For instance, “She said she would meet us for dinner, but she’s so flaky, I doubt she’ll show up.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t count on him to follow through with anything, he’s too flaky.”
  • Someone might describe a friend who frequently changes their mind as “flaky.”

28. Grimy

This slang term is used to describe something that is dirty, unclean, or covered in grime.

  • For example, “I don’t want to touch that, it looks grimy.”
  • Someone might say, “The subway station is always so grimy, I try to avoid touching anything.”
  • A person might describe a neglected bathroom as “grimy.”

29. Sleazy

This slang term is used to describe someone or something that is dishonest, disreputable, or morally questionable.

  • For instance, “I don’t trust that car salesman, he seems really sleazy.”
  • A person might say, “The club down the street is known for its sleazy atmosphere.”
  • Someone might describe a tabloid magazine as “sleazy.”

30. Grim

This slang term is used to describe something that is depressing, gloomy, or lacking hope.

  • For example, “The news about the pandemic is really grim.”
  • A person might say, “I had a grim day at work, nothing seemed to go right.”
  • Someone might describe a dark and stormy night as “grim.”

31. Lousy

This word is used to describe something that is of low quality or not satisfactory.

  • For example, “The service at that restaurant was lousy.”
  • One might say, “I had a lousy day at work.”
  • Another might comment, “The weather is lousy today, let’s stay indoors.”

32. Nasty

This word is used to describe something that is unpleasant or distasteful.

  • For instance, “That food looks nasty.”
  • One might say, “I had a nasty cold last week.”
  • Another might comment, “The smell in this room is nasty.”

33. Rank

This word is used to describe something that is offensive or unpleasant.

  • For example, “That joke was really rank.”
  • One might say, “The smell coming from the garbage is rank.”
  • Another might comment, “The language in that movie was rank.”

34. Skanky

This word is used to describe something or someone that is dirty or unclean.

  • For instance, “Don’t touch that skanky old towel.”
  • One might say, “She’s always wearing skanky clothes.”
  • Another might comment, “The bathroom in this place is skanky.”

35. Snide

This word is used to describe a remark or comment that is mocking or sarcastic.

  • For example, “He made a snide remark about her outfit.”
  • One might say, “She always has a snide comment to make.”
  • Another might comment, “I can’t stand his snide attitude.”

36. Spurious

This term is used to describe something that is not genuine or authentic. It implies that something is deceptive or misleading.

  • For example, “The article made spurious claims about the benefits of a certain product.”
  • In a court case, a lawyer might argue, “The evidence presented by the prosecution is spurious and should be disregarded.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t trust that website, it’s known for spreading spurious information.”

37. Tainted

To be tainted means to be affected or influenced in a negative way. It suggests that something has been spoiled or compromised.

  • For instance, “The tainted food caused an outbreak of illness.”
  • In a political scandal, one might say, “The politician’s reputation is forever tainted by the corruption charges.”
  • A person might describe a relationship as “tainted” if one partner has cheated.

38. Tawdry

This term refers to something that is showy or flashy, but in a cheap or tasteless way. It implies a lack of elegance or class.

  • For example, “She wore a tawdry dress to the party.”
  • One might describe a tacky souvenir as “tawdry.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer a more sophisticated style, not something tawdry and garish.”

39. Unsound

To be unsound means to be weak or lacking in strength. It suggests that something is not well-founded or reliable.

  • For instance, “The bridge was deemed unsound and had to be closed for repairs.”
  • In a debate, one might argue, “His argument is unsound and based on faulty assumptions.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t rely on the information from that source, it’s unsound.”

40. Vile

This term is used to describe something that is morally repugnant or extremely unpleasant. It suggests a strong feeling of disgust or aversion.

  • For example, “The dictator’s actions were vile and inhumane.”
  • One might describe a foul odor as “vile.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe he said such vile things about her.”

41. Wobbly

This term refers to something that is not right or is not in its proper place. It can also describe a feeling of uneasiness or uncertainty.

  • For example, “The table is wobbly, we need to fix it.”
  • A person might say, “I feel a bit wobbly after that roller coaster ride.”
  • Another might use it metaphorically and say, “The economy is on shaky ground, things are getting wobbly.”

42. Yucky

This slang term is used to describe something that is not right or is unappealing. It is often used to express dislike or disgust.

  • For instance, “I tried the new dish at the restaurant, but it was really yucky.”
  • A person might say, “I hate the taste of mushrooms, they’re so yucky.”
  • Another might comment, “The smell in here is yucky, we need to open some windows.”

43. Bent

This term is used to describe someone or something that is not right or is involved in illegal or unethical activities. It can also be used to describe someone who is not mentally stable.

  • For example, “He’s a bit bent, I wouldn’t trust him with my money.”
  • A person might say, “The company’s practices are bent, they’re not following the law.”
  • Another might comment, “I think he’s a bit bent in the head, he’s always talking to himself.”

44. Cheesy

This slang term is used to describe something that is not right or is lacking in taste or style. It can also refer to something that is overly sentimental or cliché.

  • For instance, “That movie was so cheesy, the dialogue was cringeworthy.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stand cheesy pick-up lines, they never work.”
  • Another might comment, “The decorations at the party were cheesy, it looked like a children’s birthday party.”

45. Crummy

This term is used to describe something that is not right or is of inferior quality. It can also refer to something that is unpleasant or disappointing.

  • For example, “I stayed at a crummy motel during my road trip, the room was dirty and the bed was uncomfortable.”
  • A person might say, “I had a crummy day at work, everything went wrong.”
  • Another might comment, “The weather is crummy today, it’s been raining all day.”

46. Grotty

This slang term is used to describe something that is dirty, run-down, or generally unpleasant. It can be used to describe a physical space or an object.

  • For example, “I stayed in a grotty motel during my road trip.”
  • A person might say, “This restaurant is a bit grotty, let’s find somewhere else.”
  • Another might comment, “The bathroom in this bar is really grotty, I wouldn’t recommend using it.”

47. Lame

This slang term is used to describe something that is uncool, boring, or disappointing. It can be used to describe a person, an activity, or an event.

  • For instance, “That movie was so lame, I fell asleep halfway through.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t invite him, he’s really lame.”
  • Another might comment, “The party was pretty lame, not many people showed up.”

48. Manky

This slang term is used to describe something that is dirty, grimy, or unappealing. It can be used to describe a person, an object, or a situation.

  • For example, “I found a manky old sock under the bed.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling a bit manky after working out.”
  • Another might comment, “The weather is so manky today, I don’t want to go outside.”

49. Tacky

This slang term is used to describe something that is in poor taste, gaudy, or cheap-looking. It can be used to describe clothing, decorations, or behavior.

  • For instance, “That outfit is so tacky, it clashes with everything.”
  • A person might say, “The party decorations are really tacky, they look like they came from a dollar store.”
  • Another might comment, “His jokes are so tacky, they’re not even funny.”

50. Trashy

This slang term is used to describe something that is low-quality, lacking in class, or vulgar. It can be used to describe a person, a book, a movie, or a neighborhood.

  • For example, “I can’t believe you’re reading that trashy romance novel.”
  • A person might say, “She’s always dressed so trashy, it’s embarrassing.”
  • Another might comment, “This neighborhood has become so trashy, I can’t wait to move.”

51. Not kosher

This phrase is often used to describe something that is not right or fair. It originated from the Jewish dietary laws that dictate what foods are considered “kosher” or acceptable to eat.

  • For example, if someone cheats in a game, you might say, “That’s not kosher.”
  • When discussing a suspicious business deal, one might say, “Something about that deal seems not kosher.”
  • A person might describe a dishonest action as, “That’s definitely not kosher behavior.”

52. Out of whack

This phrase is used to describe something that is not working correctly or is out of order.

  • For instance, if a machine is not functioning properly, you might say, “It’s out of whack.”
  • When discussing a plan that is not going as expected, one might say, “Everything is out of whack.”
  • A person might describe a misaligned object as, “That painting is hanging out of whack.”

53. Out of sorts

This phrase is used to describe someone who is feeling off or not themselves.

  • For example, if someone is in a bad mood, you might say, “They’re out of sorts.”
  • When discussing a person who is acting strangely, one might say, “They seem out of sorts today.”
  • A person might describe feeling tired and irritable as, “I’m just out of sorts today.”

54. Cockeyed

This term is used to describe something that is not straight or aligned correctly.

  • For instance, if a picture frame is hanging crooked, you might say, “It’s cockeyed.”
  • When discussing a plan that is not well thought out, one might say, “That idea is cockeyed.”
  • A person might describe a lopsided object as, “That tower is leaning and cockeyed.”

55. Goofy

This word is used to describe someone or something that is odd, silly, or eccentric.

  • For example, if someone tells a funny joke, you might say, “That’s a goofy joke.”
  • When discussing a person who is acting silly, one might say, “They’re being goofy.”
  • A person might describe a strange-looking object as, “That’s a goofy-looking sculpture.”

56. Kooky

This term is used to describe someone or something that is strange, odd, or unconventional.

  • For example, “She always dresses in kooky outfits that no one else would wear.”
  • Someone might say, “That movie had a kooky plot twist that I didn’t see coming.”
  • A person describing a friend might say, “He’s a bit kooky, but he’s always fun to be around.”

57. Loony

This slang term is used to describe someone who is mentally unstable or behaving in a strange or irrational manner.

  • For instance, “He’s acting like a loony, talking to himself and laughing for no reason.”
  • A person might say, “I thought I saw a loony walking down the street, wearing a tinfoil hat.”
  • Someone might describe a chaotic situation as, “It was complete loony madness at the concert.”

58. Out of kilter

This phrase is used to describe something that is not working or functioning correctly.

  • For example, “Ever since the storm, my car has been out of kilter and making strange noises.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t concentrate on my work when my desk is out of kilter.”
  • Someone might describe a misaligned picture as, “It’s hanging on the wall all crooked and out of kilter.”

59. Haywire

This term is used to describe something that is malfunctioning, chaotic, or out of control.

  • For instance, “The computer went haywire and crashed right in the middle of an important presentation.”
  • A person might say, “My plans for the day went haywire when I got stuck in traffic for hours.”
  • Someone might describe a situation as, “Everything went haywire when the power went out during the storm.”

60. Out of line

This phrase is used to describe someone who is acting in a way that is disrespectful, rude, or unacceptable.

  • For example, “He crossed the line when he made those offensive comments.”
  • A person might say, “The teacher had to discipline the student for being out of line.”
  • Someone might describe a coworker’s behavior as, “He’s always out of line, constantly interrupting and talking over others.”

61. Out of joint

This phrase is often used to describe something that is not in its proper place or is not working as it should. It can be used both literally and figuratively.

  • For example, “My shoulder is out of joint, and it’s causing me a lot of pain.”
  • In a discussion about a dysfunctional team, someone might say, “The whole project is out of joint, and we need to find a solution.”
  • Another usage could be, “His comments during the meeting were completely out of joint with the rest of the conversation.”

62. Out of balance

This phrase is used to describe a situation or condition that is not stable or harmonious. It can refer to physical balance or metaphorical balance in various contexts.

  • For instance, “The car feels out of balance, and I think it needs its tires aligned.”
  • In a discussion about work-life balance, someone might say, “I feel completely out of balance with my current workload.”
  • Another usage could be, “The team dynamics are out of balance, and it’s affecting our productivity.”

63. Out of control

This phrase is used to describe a situation or behavior that is not being properly managed or regulated. It can refer to both physical and metaphorical lack of control.

  • For example, “The fire is out of control, and we need more firefighters to contain it.”
  • In a discussion about a chaotic party, someone might say, “Things quickly got out of control, and the police had to be called.”
  • Another usage could be, “Her emotions were out of control, and she couldn’t stop crying.”

64. Out of touch

This phrase is used to describe someone who is disconnected from the current state of affairs or lacks awareness of current trends, ideas, or developments.

  • For instance, “My grandparents are out of touch with technology and have no idea how to use a smartphone.”
  • In a discussion about a politician’s outdated views, someone might say, “He’s completely out of touch with the needs of the younger generation.”
  • Another usage could be, “The company’s management is out of touch with the concerns of its employees.”

65. Out of reach

This phrase is used to describe something that is not within one’s physical or metaphorical grasp. It can refer to both tangible and intangible things.

  • For example, “The book I want to read is out of reach on the top shelf.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, someone might say, “Owning a luxury car is currently out of reach for me.”
  • Another usage could be, “Her dreams of becoming an actress seemed out of reach until she got her big break.”

66. Out of time

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is running out of time or is behind schedule. It implies that there is not enough time to complete a task or meet a deadline.

  • For example, a student might say, “I’m out of time to finish my essay before the deadline.”
  • A person in a meeting might mention, “We’re out of time for further discussion on this topic.”
  • Someone planning an event might realize, “I’m out of time to send out the invitations.”

67. Out of sight

This phrase is used to describe something that is not visible or cannot be seen. It can also be used to express surprise or excitement about something.

  • For instance, someone might exclaim, “Wow, that car is out of sight!”
  • A person might say, “The view from the top of the mountain is out of sight.”
  • A friend might ask, “Where did you get that out of sight outfit?”

68. Out of bounds

This phrase is used to indicate that something is not allowed or off-limits. It can refer to physical boundaries or rules and regulations.

  • For example, a sign might say, “Private property, keep out, out of bounds.”
  • A teacher might warn a student, “Using your phone during the test is out of bounds.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Playing in the street is out of bounds.”

69. Out of the loop

This phrase is used to describe someone who is not informed or not included in a particular situation or conversation. It implies that the person is unaware of recent developments or changes.

  • For instance, a coworker might say, “I feel out of the loop because I missed yesterday’s meeting.”
  • A friend might ask, “What’s the latest gossip? I feel out of the loop.”
  • A team member might say, “I need to catch up on the project updates. I’ve been out of the loop.”

70. Out of the ordinary

This phrase is used to describe something that is not typical or usual. It implies that something is different or unexpected.

  • For example, a person might say, “Seeing a shooting star is out of the ordinary.”
  • A friend might comment, “Your outfit today is out of the ordinary, but I like it.”
  • A coworker might say, “The company’s decision to close early is out of the ordinary.”

71. Out of the question

This phrase is used to indicate that something is not possible or cannot be considered.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can I borrow your car for the weekend?” and the answer is “Sorry, that’s out of the question.”
  • In a discussion about budget cuts, someone might say, “Reducing staff is out of the question. We need everyone on board.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Going to the party without adult supervision is out of the question.”

72. Out of the blue

This phrase is used to describe something that happens suddenly or unexpectedly.

  • For instance, if someone receives a surprise visit from a friend, they might say, “He showed up at my door out of the blue.”
  • If a person suddenly starts singing in the middle of a conversation, someone might say, “That came out of the blue.”
  • A news anchor might report, “The company announced layoffs out of the blue, surprising employees.”

73. Out of the way

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been completed, resolved, or taken care of.

  • For example, if someone finishes a task, they might say, “I finally got that out of the way.”
  • In a discussion about obstacles, someone might say, “Let’s address this issue first and get it out of the way.”
  • A student might say, “I finished my homework early, so now it’s out of the way.”

74. Out of the picture

This phrase is used to describe someone who is no longer involved or relevant in a situation.

  • For instance, if a person leaves a job or project, someone might say, “Now that they’re out of the picture, we can move forward.”
  • In a discussion about a relationship, someone might say, “Their ex is out of the picture now, so they can focus on themselves.”
  • A friend might say, “I broke up with my toxic partner, and now they’re out of the picture.”