Top 11 Slang For Not Understandable – Meaning & Usage

Ever found yourself in a conversation where the slang used makes you feel like you’re in a whole different world? We’ve got your back. In this article, we’ve gathered the top slang for not understandable that will have you nodding along confidently in any conversation. Say goodbye to feeling lost in translation and hello to being in the know!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Greek to me

This phrase is used to describe something that is completely incomprehensible or difficult to understand. It implies that the speaker does not understand the language or concept being discussed.

  • For example, if someone is explaining complex calculus equations to a person with no mathematical background, the person might say, “Sorry, but that’s all Greek to me.”
  • In a conversation about advanced physics theories, a person might admit, “I studied biology, so most of this is Greek to me.”
  • A student struggling with a difficult foreign language class might say, “The professor’s lectures might as well be Greek to me.”

2. Gibberish

This term refers to speech or writing that is unintelligible, nonsensical, or difficult to understand. It implies that the words being used have no coherent meaning.

  • For instance, if someone is speaking in a language that the listener does not understand, they might say, “Sorry, but it sounds like gibberish to me.”
  • In a heated argument where one person is making illogical points, the other might say, “Stop spouting gibberish and make a valid argument.”
  • A person trying to decipher a poorly written document might mutter, “This is all gibberish. I can’t make sense of it.”

3. Double Dutch

This phrase is used to describe language or information that is confusing, unclear, or difficult to understand. It implies that the speaker is speaking a foreign language or using complex terminology.

  • For example, if someone is explaining advanced computer programming concepts to a person with no coding experience, the person might say, “Sorry, but that’s all double Dutch to me.”
  • In a conversation about legal jargon, a person might admit, “I’m not a lawyer, so most of this is double Dutch to me.”
  • A student struggling with a complex scientific paper might say, “The author’s writing style is like double Dutch. I can’t follow their arguments.”

4. Gobbledygook

This term refers to language that is overly complicated, unclear, or difficult to understand, often found in official documents, legal texts, or technical manuals. It implies that the language is intentionally convoluted or unnecessarily complex.

  • For instance, if someone is reading a government policy document with complex legal language, they might say, “This is all gobbledygook. Can someone translate it into plain English?”
  • In a discussion about a complicated scientific theory, a person might admit, “The technical jargon in this paper is pure gobbledygook to me.”
  • A person trying to decipher a complex software instruction manual might mutter, “Who wrote this gobbledygook? It’s impossible to understand.”

5. Jibber-jabber

This term refers to speech that is rapid, unintelligible, or nonsensical. It implies that the speaker is talking without making any coherent sense.

  • For example, if someone is rambling on without making any clear points, the listener might say, “Stop with all the jibber-jabber and get to the point.”
  • In a conversation where someone is speaking in a language the listener does not understand, they might say, “Sorry, but it all sounds like jibber-jabber to me.”
  • A person listening to a confusing presentation might mutter, “I can’t follow this jibber-jabber. It’s just a bunch of random words.”

6. Mumbo jumbo

This term refers to speech or writing that is difficult to understand or has no clear meaning. It is often used to describe jargon or technical language that is confusing to the average person.

  • For example, a person might say, “I couldn’t make sense of all the mumbo jumbo in that legal document.”
  • In a discussion about complicated scientific concepts, someone might comment, “All this mumbo jumbo is making my head spin.”
  • A person might dismiss a long-winded explanation by saying, “Stop with the mumbo jumbo and just give me the simple answer.”

7. Greek salad

This term is used metaphorically to describe something that is confusing or hard to comprehend. It implies that the subject or situation is like a mixed salad with various ingredients that don’t easily fit together.

  • For instance, if someone is trying to explain a complex math problem, a person might say, “It’s all Greek salad to me.”
  • In a conversation about a convoluted plot in a movie, someone might comment, “The story was a bit of a Greek salad – too many twists and turns.”
  • A person might use this term to express frustration when trying to follow a complicated set of instructions, saying, “This manual is like trying to decipher a Greek salad.”

8. Technobabble

This term refers to technical language or jargon that is difficult for the average person to understand. It is often used to describe complex explanations or discussions that are full of technical terms and concepts.

  • For example, in a conversation about computers, someone might say, “I don’t understand all the technobabble about processors and RAM.”
  • In a discussion about a new scientific discovery, a person might comment, “The article was filled with technobabble that went over my head.”
  • A person might use this term to express frustration when reading a confusing user manual, saying, “Why can’t they explain it without all the technobabble?”

9. Hocus pocus

This term refers to language or actions that are meant to deceive or confuse. It is often used to describe tricks or illusions that are performed to create an illusion of magic or supernatural power.

  • For instance, if someone is trying to sell a product with exaggerated claims, a person might say, “Don’t fall for their hocus pocus.”
  • In a discussion about political speeches, someone might comment, “Politicians often use hocus pocus to distract from the real issues.”
  • A person might use this term to express skepticism when presented with an unbelievable story, saying, “That sounds like a lot of hocus pocus to me.”

10. Blah blah

This term is used to describe speech or writing that is boring, uninteresting, or lacks substance. It is often used when someone is not paying attention to what is being said or when the speaker is going on without saying anything important.

  • For example, in a conversation about a long and tedious meeting, someone might say, “The boss just went on and on with his blah blah.”
  • In a discussion about a boring lecture, a person might comment, “I couldn’t stay awake during all the blah blah.”
  • A person might use this term to dismiss someone’s rambling or repetitive speech, saying, “I’ve heard enough of your blah blah, get to the point.”

11. Mind-boggling

This term is used to describe something that is extremely difficult to comprehend or understand. It implies that the subject matter is so complex or puzzling that it can “boggle” or overwhelm the mind.

  • For example, “The professor’s lecture on quantum physics was mind-boggling.”
  • When faced with a complicated math problem, someone might say, “This equation is mind-boggling.”
  • A person might describe a magic trick as “mind-boggling” if they can’t figure out how it’s done.
See also  Top 68 Slang For Bad Word – Meaning & Usage