Top 57 Slang For Nothing – Meaning & Usage

In a world where language is constantly evolving, it seems like there’s a slang term for everything. But what about when there’s nothing? Well, fear not! We’ve scoured the depths of the internet to find the top slang phrases and expressions that mean “nothing.” From “zilch” to “nada,” we’ve got you covered. Get ready to expand your linguistic repertoire and never be at a loss for words again!

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1. Nada

This word is derived from Spanish and is commonly used to mean “nothing” or “zero.” It is often used informally to indicate the absence of something.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Did you find any evidence?” one might respond, “Nada, there was nothing there.”
  • When asked about their plans for the weekend, a person might say, “I’ve got nada going on, just staying home.”
  • If someone asks for your opinion on a certain movie, you might respond, “Sorry, I’ve seen nada of it.”

2. Zilch

This word is used to mean “nothing” or “zero.” It is often used informally to indicate the absence of something.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Did you find any errors in the report?” one might respond, “Zilch, everything looks good.”
  • When asked about their knowledge of a particular subject, a person might say, “I know zilch about it.”
  • If someone asks if you have any experience with a certain software, you might reply, “Sorry, I’ve got zilch experience with it.”

3. Zip

This word is used to mean “nothing” or “zero.” It is often used informally to indicate the absence of something.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Did you see any birds in the park?” one might respond, “Zip, there were no birds.”
  • When asked about their understanding of a certain concept, a person might say, “I understand zip about it.”
  • If someone asks if you have any spare change, you might reply, “Sorry, I’ve got zip on me.”

4. Bugger All

This phrase is used to mean “absolutely nothing” or “nothing at all.” It is often used informally in British English.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Did you hear any news about the project?” one might respond, “Bugger all, I haven’t heard anything.”
  • When asked about their plans for the evening, a person might say, “I’ve got bugger all going on, just staying in.”
  • If someone asks if you have any suggestions, you might reply, “Sorry, I’ve got bugger all ideas.”

5. Naught

This word is used to mean “zero” or “nothing.” It is often used in a formal or poetic context.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Did you find any errors in the manuscript?” one might respond, “Naught, everything looks perfect.”
  • When asked about their knowledge of a specific historical event, a person might say, “I know naught about it.”
  • If someone asks if you have any regrets, you might reply, “No, I have naught to regret.”

6. Nil

Nil is a term used to represent the number zero in various contexts. It is commonly used in sports to indicate that a team or player has not scored any points.

  • For example, in a soccer match, the score might be “2-0” or “2-nil” to indicate that one team has scored two goals and the other team has not scored any.
  • A cricket commentator might say, “The batsman was caught out for a duck, so his score remains nil.”
  • In a basketball game, a player might miss a shot and a commentator might say, “He’s shooting nil percent from the field.”

7. Whippersnapper

Whippersnapper is a playful term used to describe a young person, often with a sense of admiration or annoyance. It can be used to refer to someone who is energetic, cheeky, or impertinent.

  • For instance, an older person might say, “Those whippersnappers have so much energy, I can’t keep up!”
  • A teacher might scold a misbehaving student by saying, “Stop being such a whippersnapper!”
  • In a nostalgic conversation, someone might say, “Back in my day, we didn’t have smartphones. Whippersnappers these days have it easy!”

8. Goose Egg

Goose egg is a slang term used to represent the number zero. It is commonly used in sports to indicate that a team or player has not scored any points.

  • For example, in a baseball game, the score might be “3-0” or “three goose eggs” to indicate that one team has scored three runs and the other team has not scored any.
  • A tennis commentator might say, “The player served an ace and won the game to love, with a goose egg on the opponent’s side.”
  • In a basketball game, a team might have a score of “22-0” and a commentator might say, “They’re dominating the game, shutting out the other team with a goose egg.”

9. Duck Soup

Duck soup is a slang term used to describe something that is very easy or effortless. It implies that a task or situation requires little effort or skill to accomplish.

  • For instance, if someone completes a difficult puzzle quickly, they might say, “That was duck soup for me.”
  • A chef might say, “Cooking this dish is duck soup, I could do it with my eyes closed.”
  • In a conversation about a simple job, someone might say, “That task is duck soup, anyone could do it.”

10. Inconsequential

Inconsequential is a term used to describe something that is not important or significant. It implies that a person, thing, or event has little or no impact or relevance.

  • For example, in a discussion about the outcome of a game, someone might say, “The final score is inconsequential, what matters is how the team played.”
  • A student might dismiss a minor mistake by saying, “It’s inconsequential, it won’t affect my overall grade.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “This point is inconsequential to the main topic, let’s focus on the more important issues.”

11. Zero

Zero is a numerical value that represents the absence or lack of quantity or value. In slang, it can be used to describe having nothing at all.

  • For example, “I have zero interest in that movie.”
  • Someone might say, “He knows zero about cars.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “The team scored zero points in the first half.”

12. Squat

Squat is a slang term that means absolutely nothing or no value. It is often used to emphasize the absence of something.

  • For instance, “He didn’t do squat to help.”
  • Someone might say, “I’ve got squat in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about accomplishments, one might say, “She hasn’t achieved squat in her career.”

13. Jack

Jack is a slang term that can mean nothing or no one. It is often used to express the absence of something or someone.

  • For example, “I know jack about art.”
  • Someone might say, “He’s not worth jack.”
  • In a discussion about plans, one might say, “We have jack to do this weekend.”

14. Diddly-squat

Diddly-squat is a slang term that means absolutely nothing. It is often used to emphasize the absence of something.

  • For instance, “He didn’t contribute diddly-squat to the project.”
  • Someone might say, “I’ve accomplished diddly-squat today.”
  • In a conversation about options, one might say, “We have diddly-squat to choose from.”

15. Nought

Nought is a slang term that can mean zero or nothing. It is often used to express the absence or lack of something.

  • For example, “He achieved nought in his career.”
  • Someone might say, “I have nought to wear for the party.”
  • In a discussion about scores, one might say, “The team ended with a nought on the scoreboard.”

16. Sweet Fanny Adams

This phrase is used to emphasize that there is absolutely nothing of value or significance. It is often used to express disappointment or frustration.

  • For example, “I worked all day and got sweet Fanny Adams done.”
  • In a conversation about a failed project, someone might say, “All our efforts resulted in sweet Fanny Adams.”
  • Another usage could be, “I asked him for help, but he did sweet Fanny Adams to assist me.”

17. Bupkis

This Yiddish term is used to describe absolutely nothing or zero. It is often used to express disappointment or to indicate that someone has received nothing of value.

  • For instance, “I searched the entire house and found bupkis.”
  • In a discussion about a failed business venture, someone might say, “We invested so much money, but in the end, we got bupkis.”
  • Another usage could be, “He promised to help, but he delivered bupkis.”

18. Zippo

This term is often used to refer to an empty or insignificant amount of something. It can also be used to describe a lack of progress or results.

  • For example, “I checked my pockets, but I had zippo money.”
  • In a conversation about a disappointing meal, someone might say, “The portion size was tiny, I got zippo food.”
  • Another usage could be, “I’ve been studying for hours, but I’ve made zippo progress.”

19. Doodle-squat

This slang term is used to describe something that is completely insignificant or worthless. It is often used to express frustration or disappointment.

  • For instance, “I’ve been waiting for hours and got doodle-squat service.”
  • In a conversation about a failed attempt, someone might say, “I tried my best, but I achieved doodle-squat.”
  • Another usage could be, “He promised to help, but he did doodle-squat in the end.”

20. Nix

This term is used to indicate that there is nothing or zero of something. It can also be used to express the act of canceling or rejecting something.

  • For example, “I searched the entire house, but I found nix.”
  • In a discussion about a failed plan, someone might say, “We put in so much effort, but we got nix in the end.”
  • Another usage could be, “I asked for a raise, but my boss gave me nix.”

21. Zed

Zed is a slang term for the number zero. It is commonly used in British English and other English-speaking countries outside of the United States.

  • For example, someone might say, “I scored a zed on the test. I didn’t get a single question right.”
  • In a discussion about counting, someone might ask, “How do you say ‘zero’ in British English?” and another person might respond, “They say ‘zed’ instead.”
  • A teacher might explain to their students, “In some countries, they use ‘zed’ instead of ‘zero’ to refer to the number 0.”

22. Diddly

Diddly is a slang term used to mean “nothing at all” or “absolutely nothing.” It is often used to emphasize the absence or lack of something.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I didn’t do diddly today. I just sat around and watched TV.”
  • In a conversation about productivity, someone might ask, “What did you accomplish today?” and another person might respond, “Diddly. I didn’t get anything done.”
  • A person might use the term to express disappointment, saying, “I thought I was going to win the lottery, but I ended up winning diddly.”

23. Squadoosh

Squadoosh is a slang term that means “absolutely nothing” or “zero.” It is often used to convey a complete lack or absence of something.

  • For example, someone might say, “I have squadoosh in my bank account. I’m completely broke.”
  • In a discussion about accomplishments, someone might ask, “What did you achieve today?” and another person might respond, “Squadoosh. I didn’t accomplish anything.”
  • A person might use the term to express disappointment or frustration, saying, “I studied all night for the test, but I ended up getting squadoosh.”

24. Niente

Niente is an Italian slang term that means “nothing.” It is commonly used in Italian-speaking countries and among Italian speakers.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Ho niente da fare” which translates to “I have nothing to do.”
  • In a conversation about possessions, someone might ask, “What do you have?” and another person might respond, “Niente. I don’t have anything.”
  • A person might use the term to express a lack of interest or importance, saying, “That movie was niente. It didn’t impress me at all.”

25. Nihil

Nihil is a Latin term that means “nothingness” or “the state of being nothing.” It is often used in philosophical discussions or to convey a sense of emptiness or insignificance.

  • For example, someone might say, “Life is ultimately meaningless. It’s all just nihil.”
  • In a conversation about existentialism, someone might ask, “What is the meaning of life?” and another person might respond, “Nihil. Life has no inherent meaning.”
  • A person might use the term to express a sense of despair or hopelessness, saying, “I feel like I’m trapped in a state of nihil.”

26. Zilchers

This term is slang for absolutely nothing. It is often used to emphasize that there is no amount or value of something.

  • For example, “I searched the entire house, but found zilchers.”
  • A person might say, “I put in a lot of effort, but got zilchers in return.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I have zilchers in my bank account!”

27. Noughts and crosses

This phrase refers to the game of tic-tac-toe, which is played by drawing a grid of nine squares and trying to get three of your marks in a row.

  • For instance, “Let’s play a quick game of noughts and crosses.”
  • During a friendly competition, someone might say, “I challenge you to a game of noughts and crosses!”
  • A person might ask, “Do you remember how to play noughts and crosses?”

28. Zonk

This term means zero or nothing and is often used to indicate a complete lack or absence of something.

  • For example, “I have zonk knowledge about that topic.”
  • A person might say, “After searching for hours, I found zonk information.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I was expecting a big reward, but got zonk!”

29. Zilchola

This term is a combination of “zilch” and “cola” and is used to emphasize that there is absolutely nothing or no value.

  • For instance, “I’ve got zilchola in my wallet.”
  • When asked about their plans, someone might say, “I’ve got zilchola going on this weekend.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I worked hard all day, but accomplished zilchola!”

30. Zilcheroo

This term is a playful variation of “zilch” and is used to emphasize that there is absolutely nothing or no value.

  • For example, “I’m afraid I’ve got zilcheroo to contribute to the discussion.”
  • When asked about their progress, someone might say, “I’ve made zilcheroo headway on the project.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I’ve been waiting for hours and got zilcheroo service!”

31. Bubkes

This Yiddish term is used to mean “nothing” or “worthless.” It can be used to emphasize the lack of value or significance of something.

  • For example, “After all his hard work, he got bubkes in return.”
  • In a conversation about a disappointing outcome, someone might say, “I was expecting a promotion, but I got bubkes.”
  • A person might use this term humorously to describe a situation with no results, saying, “I’ve been searching for my keys for hours, and I found bubkes.”

32. Sod all

This British slang term is used to mean “nothing at all” or “absolutely nothing.” It is often used to express frustration or disappointment.

  • For instance, “I’ve been waiting here for ages, and I’ve seen sod all.”
  • In a conversation about a disappointing event, someone might say, “The concert was supposed to be amazing, but it was sod all.”
  • A person might use this term humorously to describe a lack of progress in a task, saying, “I’ve been working on this project all day, and I’ve achieved sod all.”

33. Sweet F.A.

This slang term is used to mean “absolutely nothing” or “nothing at all.” It is often used to emphasize the complete lack of something.

  • For example, “I asked for help, but I got sweet F.A. from them.”
  • In a conversation about a disappointing outcome, someone might say, “I put in so much effort, and I got sweet F.A. in return.”
  • A person might use this term humorously to describe a lack of progress in a task, saying, “I’ve been working on this for hours, and I’ve achieved sweet F.A.”

34. Null

In computer programming and mathematics, “null” is used to represent the absence of a value or a value of zero. It can also be used informally to mean “nothing” or “zero.”

  • For instance, “The variable was set to null, indicating no value.”
  • In a discussion about a data set, one might say, “There were null values in some of the columns.”
  • A person might use this term informally to describe a lack of results, saying, “I searched the entire house, but I found null.”

35. Void

The term “void” is used to mean “empty” or “lacking.” It can also be used to describe something that is invalid or without legal effect.

  • For example, “The room was void of any furniture.”
  • In a conversation about a contract, someone might say, “The agreement was declared void due to a breach of terms.”
  • A person might use this term metaphorically to describe a feeling of emptiness or loneliness, saying, “After the breakup, I felt a void in my life.”

36. Blank

This term refers to something that is devoid of content or meaning. It can also be used to describe a situation where nothing is achieved or obtained.

  • For example, if someone asks for your opinion on a topic you know nothing about, you might respond, “Sorry, I draw a blank on that.”
  • In a game of trivia, a player might say, “I’m completely blanking on this question.”
  • If someone fails to provide an answer to a question, you might say, “They gave me a blank stare.”

37. Nuttin’

This term is a phonetic spelling of “nothing” and is often used in informal or casual speech. It is commonly used in African American Vernacular English (AAVE) and other dialects.

  • For instance, if someone asks what you’re doing tonight and you have no plans, you might respond, “Nuttin’, just gonna chill at home.”
  • In a conversation about weekend activities, someone might say, “I did nuttin’ but relax and watch TV.”
  • If someone asks if you have any money, you might reply, “I got nuttin’ in my wallet.”

38. Null and void

This phrase is used to describe something that has no legal or binding force. It suggests that an agreement, contract, or action is without effect or has no value.

  • For example, if a contract is not signed by all parties involved, it may be considered null and void.
  • In a legal dispute, a lawyer might argue, “The contract should be declared null and void due to a breach of terms.”
  • If someone tries to enforce a rule that is no longer valid, you might say, “That rule is null and void, it’s no longer applicable.”

39. Not a sausage

This phrase is used to emphasize that there is absolutely nothing of a particular thing or that nothing has happened or been achieved.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you found any interesting items at a yard sale, you might reply, “Not a sausage, it was all junk.”
  • In a discussion about a disappointing event, someone might say, “There was not a sausage worth seeing at the concert.”
  • If someone asks if you have any knowledge about a specific topic, you might respond, “Not a sausage, I’m completely clueless.”

40. Not a bean

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has no money at all. It suggests that a person is completely broke or penniless.

  • For example, if someone asks if you can lend them some money, you might reply, “Sorry, I don’t have a bean.”
  • In a conversation about financial struggles, someone might say, “I’ve been unemployed for months, I don’t have a bean.”
  • If someone asks if you can contribute to a group expense, you might say, “I’m afraid I can’t, I haven’t got a bean.”

41. Not a jot

This phrase means not even a small amount or not in the slightest. It is often used to emphasize that there is absolutely no indication or evidence of something.

  • For example, “I’ve been waiting for a response, but I’ve heard not a jot from them.”
  • In a discussion about a missing person, someone might say, “There has been not a jot of information about their whereabouts.”
  • A person might express frustration by saying, “I’ve been studying all night, and I understand not a jot of this material.”

42. Not a whit

This phrase means not in the smallest degree or not at all. It is similar to “not a jot” and is used to emphasize that there is no amount or level of something.

  • For instance, “I’ve been trying to get her attention, but she seems interested not a whit.”
  • In a conversation about a disappointing event, someone might say, “It didn’t matter how much I prepared; it helped not a whit.”
  • A person might express disbelief by saying, “I’ve searched high and low, and I’ve found not a whit of evidence to support this theory.”

43. Not a dicky bird

This phrase means not a single word or not any information at all. It is often used to express that there is no communication or response from someone or no information available.

  • For example, “I asked for an update, but I heard not a dicky bird from them.”
  • In a discussion about a secret project, someone might say, “They’ve kept it under wraps; not a dicky bird has leaked.”
  • A person might express frustration by saying, “I’ve been reaching out for days, and I’ve received not a dicky bird of a response.”

44. Not a peep

This phrase means not a single sound or not any communication. It is similar to “not a dicky bird” and is used to emphasize the absence of any noise or response.

  • For instance, “I’ve been waiting for them to call, but I haven’t heard a peep.”
  • In a discussion about a quiet child, someone might say, “Even when we ask questions, they don’t make a peep.”
  • A person might express surprise by saying, “I expected some reaction, but there wasn’t a peep from the audience.”

45. Not a pip

This phrase means not a single sound or not any noise. It is similar to “not a peep” and is used to emphasize the absence of any sound or response.

  • For example, “I’ve been listening carefully, but I haven’t heard a pip.”
  • In a conversation about a shy person, someone might say, “They never speak up; not a pip from them.”
  • A person might express disappointment by saying, “I’ve been waiting for their reaction, but there hasn’t been a pip.”

46. Not a skerrick

This phrase is used to emphasize that there is absolutely no amount of something. It is often used in a negative context to express the absence or lack of something.

  • For instance, if someone asks if there is any food left and there is none, you might say, “Sorry, not a skerrick.”
  • In a conversation about finding evidence, someone might say, “We searched the entire house, but there was not a skerrick of proof.”
  • If someone asks if you have any spare change and you don’t, you could reply, “I’m afraid I don’t have a skerrick.”

47. Not a smidgen

This phrase is used to convey the complete absence or lack of something, emphasizing that there is not even a small amount. It is often used in a negative context.

  • For example, if someone asks if you have any coffee left and there is none, you could say, “Sorry, not a smidgen.”
  • In a discussion about a missing item, someone might say, “I’ve looked everywhere, but there’s not a smidgen of it.”
  • If someone asks if you have any spare time and you don’t, you might reply, “I’m afraid I don’t have a smidgen.”

48. Not a speck

This phrase is used to emphasize that there is absolutely no amount or trace of something. It is often used in a negative context to convey the absence or lack of something.

  • For instance, if someone asks if there are any crumbs left and there are none, you could say, “Sorry, not a speck.”
  • In a conversation about cleanliness, someone might say, “I’ve cleaned every corner, there’s not a speck of dust.”
  • If someone asks if you have any spare change and you don’t, you could reply, “I’m afraid I don’t have a speck.”

49. Not a spot

This phrase is used to emphasize that there is absolutely no presence or trace of something. It is often used in a negative context to convey the absence or lack of something.

  • For example, if someone asks if there are any stains on a shirt and there are none, you could say, “Sorry, not a spot.”
  • In a discussion about cleanliness, someone might say, “I’ve scrubbed every surface, there’s not a spot left.”
  • If someone asks if you have any spare change and you don’t, you could reply, “I’m afraid I don’t have a spot.”

50. Not a trace

This phrase is used to emphasize that there is absolutely no sign or evidence of something. It is often used in a negative context to convey the absence or lack of something.

  • For instance, if someone asks if there are any footprints on the floor and there are none, you could say, “Sorry, not a trace.”
  • In a conversation about a missing person, someone might say, “We’ve searched everywhere, but there’s not a trace of them.”
  • If someone asks if you have any spare time and you don’t, you could reply, “I’m afraid I don’t have a trace.”

51. Not an iota

This phrase means that there is absolutely no amount or significance whatsoever. It is often used to emphasize that something is completely insignificant or of no value.

  • For example, “He didn’t show not an iota of remorse for his actions.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t care not an iota about what they think.”
  • Another might exclaim, “This movie is not an iota as good as the original!”

52. Not one red cent

This expression means that there is absolutely no money or payment involved. It is used to emphasize that someone is not willing to spend or give any money at all.

  • For instance, “I wouldn’t give him not one red cent for that junk.”
  • A person might say, “I worked hard for this, and I won’t give it away not one red cent.”
  • Another might declare, “They promised to pay, but in the end, I didn’t receive not one red cent.”

53. Not two hoots

This phrase means that someone has absolutely no interest or concern about something. It is often used to express indifference or a lack of enthusiasm.

  • For example, “He doesn’t give not two hoots about what others think of him.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t care not two hoots about their opinion.”
  • Another might exclaim, “She can complain all she wants, but I don’t give not two hoots about her problems.”

54. Not worth a hill of beans

This expression means that something has no value or importance whatsoever. It is often used to convey that something is completely useless or insignificant.

  • For instance, “His opinion is not worth a hill of beans.”
  • A person might say, “I tried to fix it, but it’s not worth a hill of beans.”
  • Another might declare, “The old furniture is not worth a hill of beans, so we should just throw it away.”

55. Not worth a tinker’s damn

This phrase means that something has no value or significance at all. It is often used to emphasize that something is utterly useless or of no worth.

  • For example, “Her apology was not worth a tinker’s damn.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t care what they say, it’s not worth a tinker’s damn.”
  • Another might exclaim, “The broken device is not worth a tinker’s damn, so I’m throwing it away.”

56. Not worth a whistle

This phrase is used to describe something that has little or no worth or importance. It implies that the item or action is not worth any attention or consideration.

  • For example, “That old book is not worth a whistle. It’s falling apart and nobody wants to read it.”
  • In a conversation about a disappointing movie, someone might say, “The film was not worth a whistle. It was poorly made and had no plot.”
  • A person might use this phrase to express their opinion about a pointless task, saying, “Spending time on that project is not worth a whistle. It won’t bring any results.”

57. Not worth an old song

This expression is used to convey that something is not worth any consideration or effort. It suggests that the item or action has little or no value and is not deserving of attention or investment.

  • For instance, “That broken chair is not worth an old song. It’s better to throw it away.”
  • In a discussion about a disappointing concert, someone might say, “The performance was not worth an old song. The singer was off-key and the songs were poorly performed.”
  • A person might use this phrase to express their opinion about a pointless task, saying, “Attending that meeting is not worth an old song. It won’t bring any meaningful outcomes.”
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