Top 59 Slang For Notorious – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to the world of slang, there’s a whole array of terms that can leave you scratching your head. But fear not, because we’ve got you covered! In this article, we’ve rounded up some of the most notorious slang terms that are making waves in everyday conversations. Get ready to up your slang game and impress your friends with this must-read listicle.

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1. Infamous

This term refers to someone or something that is well-known for negative reasons, often due to criminal or scandalous behavior. It suggests a reputation for being notorious or infamous.

  • For example, “Al Capone is infamous for his involvement in organized crime during the Prohibition era.”
  • In a discussion about historical figures, one might say, “Jack the Ripper is one of the most infamous serial killers in history.”
  • A journalist might write, “The company became infamous for its unethical business practices.”

2. Renowned

This word describes someone or something that is widely known and highly respected for their achievements or qualities. It suggests a reputation for excellence and recognition in a particular field.

  • For instance, “Albert Einstein is renowned for his groundbreaking theories in physics.”
  • In a conversation about literature, one might say, “Shakespeare is renowned for his plays and sonnets.”
  • A music critic might write, “Aretha Franklin is a renowned singer known for her powerful voice.”

3. Notable

This term describes someone or something that is worthy of attention or recognition due to their significance, excellence, or unique qualities. It suggests being noteworthy or deserving of mention.

  • For example, “The Nobel Prize winners are notable individuals who have made significant contributions to their respective fields.”
  • In a discussion about historical events, one might say, “The moon landing in 1969 was a notable achievement for humanity.”
  • A film critic might write, “The movie features notable performances from a talented cast.”

4. Illustrious

This word describes someone or something that is highly distinguished or famous, often due to outstanding achievements, talent, or noble qualities. It suggests a reputation for greatness or distinction.

  • For instance, “Leonardo da Vinci is an illustrious figure in the history of art and science.”
  • In a conversation about political leaders, one might say, “Nelson Mandela is an illustrious figure who fought against apartheid.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “Michael Jordan had an illustrious basketball career and is considered one of the greatest players of all time.”

5. Eminent

This term describes someone or something that is prominent, respected, and highly regarded in a particular field or profession. It suggests a reputation for excellence and expertise.

  • For example, “Jane Goodall is an eminent primatologist known for her research on chimpanzees.”
  • In a discussion about architecture, one might say, “Frank Lloyd Wright is an eminent figure in modern architecture.”
  • A science journalist might write, “The conference featured talks by eminent scientists from around the world.”

6. Prominent

This term is used to describe someone or something that is widely recognized or influential. It suggests a high level of visibility or importance.

  • For example, “She is a prominent figure in the fashion industry.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “The prominent politicians of our time have shaped the course of history.”
  • A sports fan might comment, “He is a prominent player in the league, known for his exceptional skills.”

7. Distinguished

This term is used to describe someone who is highly respected and admired for their achievements or qualities. It implies a level of excellence and distinction.

  • For instance, “He is a distinguished professor in the field of physics.”
  • When discussing military leaders, one might say, “General Smith is a distinguished veteran with a long and successful career.”
  • A person might comment, “Her distinguished career in politics has made her a role model for many.”

8. Celebrated

This term is used to describe someone who is widely recognized and praised for their accomplishments or contributions. It implies a level of fame and public acclaim.

  • For example, “He is a celebrated author, known for his best-selling novels.”
  • In the world of music, one might say, “The celebrated singer performed to a sold-out crowd.”
  • A fan might exclaim, “I can’t wait to see the celebrated actor in his upcoming film.”

9. Reputable

This term is used to describe someone or something that is held in high regard and considered trustworthy or reliable. It suggests a positive reputation or standing.

  • For instance, “He is a reputable lawyer known for his expertise.”
  • When discussing businesses, one might say, “I prefer to shop at reputable stores with good customer reviews.”
  • A person might comment, “She is a reputable journalist known for her integrity and thorough reporting.”

10. Legendary

This term is used to describe someone or something that is extremely famous and has achieved a legendary status. It implies a level of mythical or iconic significance.

  • For example, “He is a legendary musician whose songs continue to resonate with audiences.”
  • In the world of sports, one might say, “The legendary athlete broke numerous records during his career.”
  • A fan might exclaim, “I had the opportunity to see the legendary band perform live.”

11. Fabled

This term refers to someone or something that is widely known and talked about, often with a sense of awe or admiration. It implies a level of greatness or notoriety that has been passed down through stories and legends.

  • For example, “The fabled city of Atlantis is said to have sunk beneath the sea.”
  • In a discussion about famous athletes, one might say, “Michael Jordan is a fabled basketball player.”
  • A person might describe a historical figure as “the fabled ruler who conquered vast territories.”

12. Famed

This word is used to describe someone who is well-known and widely recognized for their achievements or reputation. It implies a level of fame and recognition that extends beyond a specific community or group.

  • For instance, “The famed author J.K. Rowling is known for her Harry Potter series.”
  • In a conversation about influential musicians, one might say, “Bob Dylan is a famed singer-songwriter.”
  • A person might describe a popular actor as “the famed star of numerous blockbuster films.”

13. Noted

This term is used to indicate that someone or something is widely acknowledged or known for a particular quality, achievement, or characteristic. It implies that the person or thing has received attention or recognition for their notable traits.

  • For example, “The noted scientist made groundbreaking discoveries in the field of genetics.”
  • In a discussion about influential artists, one might say, “The noted painter is known for his abstract expressionist style.”
  • A person might describe a respected politician as “the noted advocate for social justice.”

14. Infamy

This word refers to a state of being famous for something negative or notorious. It implies a reputation for wrongdoing or dishonorable actions that has gained widespread attention and notoriety.

  • For instance, “The criminal gained infamy for his numerous bank robberies.”
  • In a conversation about historical events, one might say, “The assassination of the president brought infamy to the perpetrator.”
  • A person might describe a scandalous celebrity as “a figure of infamy in the tabloids.”

15. Venerable

This term is used to describe someone or something that is highly regarded and respected, often due to their age, wisdom, or long-standing reputation. It implies a sense of honor and reverence for the person or thing.

  • For example, “The venerable professor has been teaching for over 50 years.”
  • In a discussion about influential religious leaders, one might say, “The venerable monk is highly respected within his community.”
  • A person might describe a prestigious institution as “a venerable university with a long history of academic excellence.”
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16. Respected

This term refers to someone or something that is held in high esteem or admiration. It implies that the person or thing has earned respect or is considered honorable.

  • For example, “He is a respected member of the community, known for his charitable contributions.”
  • In a discussion about influential leaders, one might say, “Nelson Mandela is widely respected for his fight against apartheid.”
  • A person might describe a well-regarded book by saying, “It’s a respected classic in the literary world.”

17. Well-known

This phrase describes someone or something that is widely known or recognized by a large number of people. It implies that the person or thing has gained a significant level of popularity or notoriety.

  • For instance, “She is a well-known actress who has starred in several blockbuster films.”
  • In a discussion about historical figures, one might say, “Abraham Lincoln is well-known for his role in abolishing slavery.”
  • A person might comment on a popular tourist attraction by saying, “The Eiffel Tower is a well-known symbol of Paris.”

18. Eclat

This term refers to a brilliant or striking success that brings great acclaim or attention. It implies that the person or thing has achieved something remarkable or extraordinary.

  • For example, “His performance at the concert was met with eclat, earning him a standing ovation.”
  • In a discussion about notable achievements, one might say, “The discovery of a cure for a rare disease would be an example of eclat.”
  • A person might describe a highly successful business venture by saying, “Their new product launch was met with eclat, resulting in record-breaking sales.”

19. Glorious

This word describes something that is magnificent, splendid, or highly enjoyable. It implies that the person or thing brings great joy, satisfaction, or admiration.

  • For instance, “The sunset over the ocean was a glorious sight.”
  • In a discussion about a memorable event, one might say, “The wedding ceremony was a glorious celebration of love and happiness.”
  • A person might describe a delicious meal by saying, “The dessert was a glorious combination of flavors and textures.”

20. Egregious

This term describes something that is outstandingly bad, shocking, or offensive. It implies that the person or thing is remarkably or noticeably bad, often in a way that goes beyond what is expected or acceptable.

  • For example, “His behavior at the party was egregious, causing a scene and insulting multiple guests.”
  • In a discussion about ethical violations, one might say, “The company’s disregard for safety regulations was egregious and put workers at risk.”
  • A person might comment on a serious mistake by saying, “The error in the report was egregious and could have serious consequences.”

21. Conspicuous

This term refers to something or someone that stands out or is easily visible. It can also imply that the person or thing is attracting attention, often in a negative or suspicious way.

  • For example, “He walked into the party wearing a conspicuous red suit.”
  • In a discussion about a crime, someone might say, “The suspect’s conspicuous behavior made him a prime suspect.”
  • A person might comment on a controversial public figure, saying, “His conspicuous lifestyle and extravagant spending have raised many eyebrows.”

22. Notorious

This word is used to describe someone or something that is widely known, usually for negative reasons. It implies a reputation for being involved in illegal or scandalous activities.

  • For instance, “Al Capone was a notorious gangster during the Prohibition era.”
  • In a discussion about historical figures, someone might say, “Caligula was notorious for his cruel and tyrannical rule.”
  • A person might comment on a scandal, saying, “The company’s notorious history of unethical practices has damaged its reputation.”

23. Scandalous

This term is used to describe something that is considered shocking, disgraceful, or morally offensive. It often refers to behavior or actions that go against societal norms or expectations.

  • For example, “The scandalous affair between the politician and his aide made headlines.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial art piece, someone might say, “The artist’s work is known for its scandalous themes.”
  • A person might comment on a celebrity’s behavior, saying, “Her scandalous actions have caused a lot of controversy.”

24. Outlawed

This word refers to something that is illegal or forbidden. It implies that the action or item has been officially banned or made unlawful.

  • For instance, “The sale of certain drugs has been outlawed in many countries.”
  • In a discussion about historical events, someone might say, “Prohibition led to the outlawing of alcohol in the United States.”
  • A person might comment on a controversial practice, saying, “The government should consider outlawing the use of single-use plastics.”

25. Villainous

This term is used to describe someone or something that is characterized by evil, cruelty, or wickedness. It often refers to fictional characters or individuals who engage in immoral or malicious acts.

  • For example, “The Joker is known for his villainous schemes and twisted sense of humor.”
  • In a discussion about literature, someone might say, “Shakespeare’s Macbeth is a villainous character driven by ambition.”
  • A person might comment on a corrupt politician, saying, “His villainous actions have caused harm to the community.”

26. Disreputable

This term refers to someone or something that has a bad reputation or is considered untrustworthy. It implies a lack of respectability or integrity.

  • For example, “He’s known for running a disreputable business.”
  • In a discussion about politicians, someone might say, “We can’t trust those disreputable politicians to act in our best interests.”
  • A person might warn, “Stay away from that disreputable neighborhood if you want to stay safe.”

27. Sinister

This word is used to describe something or someone that is threatening, dangerous, or evil. It often implies a sense of foreboding or malevolence.

  • For instance, “He had a sinister smile that sent chills down my spine.”
  • In a horror movie review, a critic might say, “The villain’s sinister presence added to the suspense.”
  • A person might comment, “There’s something sinister about the way he always lurks in the shadows.”

28. Malevolent

This term describes someone or something that has an intention or desire to cause harm or evil. It suggests a deliberate and intentional act of wrongdoing.

  • For example, “The malevolent dictator oppressed his people for years.”
  • In a discussion about internet trolls, someone might say, “They spread their malevolent comments to provoke anger and hurt.”
  • A person might warn, “Beware of her malevolent intentions; she’s not to be trusted.”

29. Deplorable

This word is used to describe something or someone who is deserving of strong condemnation or criticism. It implies behavior or actions that are morally reprehensible or offensive.

  • For instance, “His deplorable actions towards his employees led to a public outcry.”
  • In a discussion about unethical business practices, someone might say, “Their deplorable treatment of workers is unacceptable.”
  • A person might comment, “I can’t believe he made such a deplorable comment; it’s completely disrespectful.”

30. Despicable

This term describes something or someone who is extremely unpleasant, wicked, or morally reprehensible. It suggests a strong sense of disgust or contempt.

  • For example, “His despicable behavior towards animals angered many people.”
  • In a discussion about a heinous crime, someone might say, “The perpetrator’s despicable actions shocked the community.”
  • A person might comment, “I can’t believe she would do something so despicable; it’s beyond comprehension.”

31. Abominable

This word is used to describe something or someone that is considered to be extremely unpleasant or terrible. It often implies a strong sense of disgust or revulsion.

  • For example, “The abominable conditions in the prison shocked the public.”
  • A person might say, “That movie was abominable. I couldn’t even finish watching it.”
  • In a discussion about a notorious criminal, someone might comment, “His abominable actions will never be forgotten.”

32. Odious

This term is used to describe something or someone that is considered to be extremely unpleasant, repulsive, or offensive. It conveys a strong sense of dislike or disgust.

  • For instance, “The odious smell coming from the garbage made everyone gag.”
  • A person might say, “I find his odious behavior towards women completely unacceptable.”
  • In a discussion about a corrupt politician, someone might comment, “His odious actions have tarnished the reputation of the entire party.”

33. Disgraced

This word is used to describe someone or something that has lost honor, respect, or reputation due to their actions or behavior. It implies a sense of shame or humiliation.

  • For example, “The disgraced CEO was forced to step down after the scandal.”
  • A person might say, “He was once a respected journalist, but now he’s a disgraced figure in the industry.”
  • In a discussion about a notorious criminal, someone might comment, “The disgraced politician is now serving time in prison.”

34. Flagrant

This term is used to describe something or someone that is conspicuously or obviously offensive, shocking, or scandalous. It implies a sense of brazenness or disregard for rules or norms.

  • For instance, “His flagrant disregard for the law landed him in jail.”
  • A person might say, “The flagrant abuse of power by the government has sparked widespread protests.”
  • In a discussion about a notorious fraudster, someone might comment, “His flagrant schemes fooled countless investors.”

35. Outrageous

This word is used to describe something or someone that is shocking, extreme, or beyond acceptable limits. It often implies a sense of disbelief, indignation, or anger.

  • For example, “The outrageous behavior of the celebrity made headlines.”
  • A person might say, “The prices at that restaurant are outrageous. I can’t afford to eat there.”
  • In a discussion about a notorious dictator, someone might comment, “His outrageous acts of violence against innocent civilians cannot be ignored.”

36. Scourge

This term refers to someone who causes widespread trouble or suffering. It is often used to describe someone who is notorious for their harmful actions or behavior.

  • For example, a journalist might write, “The notorious gang leader was a scourge on the community.”
  • In a discussion about criminal activity, someone might say, “The drug trade is a scourge on our society.”
  • A person might describe a corrupt politician as a “scourge on democracy.”
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37. Pariah

This word is used to describe someone who is rejected or shunned by society. It often refers to someone who is notorious for their actions or beliefs, causing them to be socially isolated.

  • For instance, a person might say, “After the scandal, she became a pariah in the industry.”
  • In a conversation about social exclusion, someone might mention, “People with mental illnesses are often treated as pariahs.”
  • A journalist might write, “The whistleblower was labeled a pariah by those in power.”

38. Reprobate

This term is used to describe someone who is morally corrupt or unprincipled. It is often used to refer to someone who is notorious for their immoral behavior or actions.

  • For example, a person might say, “He was known as a reprobate who would do anything for money.”
  • In a discussion about criminal behavior, someone might mention, “The reprobate was finally arrested after years of evading the law.”
  • A journalist might write, “The reprobate’s actions shocked the community and led to calls for stricter regulations.”

39. Miscreant

This word is used to describe someone who behaves badly or breaks the law. It is often used to refer to someone who is notorious for their misconduct or criminal activities.

  • For instance, a person might say, “The miscreant was caught stealing from multiple stores.”
  • In a conversation about juvenile delinquency, someone might mention, “Programs aimed at rehabilitating miscreants have shown promising results.”
  • A journalist might write, “The miscreant’s violent actions shocked the community and raised concerns about public safety.”

40. Malefactor

This term refers to someone who commits a crime or engages in illegal activities. It is often used to describe someone who is notorious for their criminal behavior or actions.

  • For example, a person might say, “The malefactor was sentenced to life in prison for his heinous crimes.”
  • In a discussion about organized crime, someone might mention, “Taking down the malefactors behind the drug cartel was a major victory for law enforcement.”
  • A journalist might write, “The malefactor’s arrest brought relief to the community and marked the end of a reign of terror.”

41. Delinquent

A delinquent refers to a person, typically a young one, who regularly engages in minor criminal activities or behavior that is considered to be a nuisance or disruptive. This term is often used to describe someone who breaks rules or laws, but is not yet considered a serious criminal.

  • For example, “The school had a problem with delinquents skipping class and causing trouble.”
  • A parent might say, “I’m concerned that my child is hanging out with delinquents.”
  • In a news report, a journalist might write, “The police are cracking down on delinquents in the neighborhood.”

42. Felon

A felon is someone who has been convicted of a serious crime, typically one that is punishable by imprisonment for more than one year. This term is often used to describe individuals who have committed offenses such as murder, robbery, or drug trafficking.

  • For instance, “He was labeled a felon after being found guilty of armed robbery.”
  • A lawyer might say, “A felon may face restrictions on their rights, such as the right to vote or own a firearm.”
  • In a discussion about criminal justice reform, someone might argue, “We need to find alternatives to incarceration for non-violent felons.”

43. Outlaw

An outlaw is a person who has been declared as an enemy of the state or society due to their criminal activities. This term is often used to describe individuals who have chosen to live outside the boundaries of the law and operate outside of legal systems.

  • For example, “The notorious outlaw evaded capture for years, living in hidden hideouts.”
  • A historian might say, “Outlaws like Billy the Kid have become legendary figures in American folklore.”
  • In a movie, a character might declare, “I’m going to live life as an outlaw and never be tied down by society’s rules.”

44. Criminal

A criminal is a person who has been convicted of committing a crime, regardless of the severity. This term is often used to describe individuals who have broken the law and engaged in illegal activities.

  • For instance, “The criminal was sentenced to five years in prison for theft.”
  • A police officer might say, “Our job is to apprehend criminals and bring them to justice.”
  • In a court case, a prosecutor might present evidence and say, “We have proof that the defendant is a career criminal.”

45. Offender

An offender is a person who has committed an offense or violated a law, rule, or code of conduct. This term is often used to describe individuals who have been caught in the act of breaking a specific law or regulation.

  • For example, “The offender was caught red-handed stealing from a store.”
  • A judge might say, “The court will determine an appropriate sentence for the offender.”
  • In a news report, a journalist might write, “The police are searching for the offender responsible for a string of burglaries in the area.”

46. Maleficent

This term is used to describe someone who is extremely wicked or evil. It is often associated with someone who is intentionally causing harm or suffering.

  • For example, a villain in a fairy tale might be described as maleficent.
  • In a discussion about notorious criminals, someone might say, “He was a truly maleficent individual.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a corrupt politician, saying, “He is a maleficent force in our government.”

47. Wicked

This word is used to describe someone or something that is extremely evil or morally wrong. It can also be used to describe something that is cool or impressive, depending on the context.

  • For instance, a character in a horror movie might be described as wicked.
  • In a discussion about notorious acts, someone might say, “That was a wicked crime.”
  • A person might describe a corrupt organization as wicked, saying, “They are involved in some wicked activities.”

48. Corrupt

This term is used to describe someone who is involved in dishonest or illegal activities. It is often associated with individuals who abuse their power for personal gain.

  • For example, a corrupt politician might accept bribes or engage in other illegal activities.
  • In a discussion about notorious scandals, someone might say, “The company’s corrupt practices were exposed.”
  • A person might describe a corrupt organization as corrupt, saying, “They have a long history of corrupt behavior.”

49. Degenerate

This word is used to describe someone who has fallen below normal or acceptable standards of behavior. It is often associated with individuals who engage in morally wrong or socially unacceptable actions.

  • For instance, a degenerate criminal might commit heinous acts without remorse.
  • In a discussion about notorious individuals, someone might say, “He was a degenerate who showed no regard for human life.”
  • A person might describe a corrupt society as degenerate, saying, “The decay of moral values has led to a degenerate culture.”

50. Vile

This term is used to describe someone or something that is extremely unpleasant, disgusting, or morally repulsive. It is often associated with individuals who engage in cruel or wicked actions.

  • For example, a vile criminal might commit gruesome acts that shock the conscience.
  • In a discussion about notorious figures, someone might say, “He was a vile individual who reveled in the suffering of others.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a corrupt system, saying, “The rampant corruption in our government is vile.”

51. Repugnant

This word is used to describe something that is extremely unpleasant or offensive. It implies a strong feeling of disgust or aversion towards the subject.

  • For example, “The smell coming from the dumpster was repugnant.”
  • A person might say, “I find his behavior repugnant and unacceptable.”
  • In a review of a movie, someone might write, “The violence depicted in the film was repugnant and unnecessary.”

52. Abhorrent

This word is used to describe something that is completely detestable or morally repugnant. It implies a strong feeling of disgust or hatred towards the subject.

  • For instance, “His abhorrent actions have caused immense harm to innocent people.”
  • A person might say, “I find racism and discrimination abhorrent.”
  • In a discussion about unethical business practices, someone might say, “The company’s treatment of its employees is abhorrent.”

53. Loathsome

This word is used to describe something or someone that is deserving of hatred or disgust. It implies a strong feeling of aversion or repulsion towards the subject.

  • For example, “The criminal’s loathsome acts shocked the community.”
  • A person might say, “I find his behavior towards animals loathsome.”
  • In a review of a book, someone might write, “The protagonist’s loathsome actions made it difficult to sympathize with them.”

54. Detestable

This word is used to describe something or someone that is deserving of intense dislike or hatred. It implies a strong feeling of aversion or repugnance towards the subject.

  • For instance, “The dictator’s detestable regime oppressed its citizens.”
  • A person might say, “I find his attitude towards women detestable.”
  • In a discussion about unethical business practices, someone might say, “The company’s treatment of its workers is detestable.”

55. Execrable

This word is used to describe something that is extremely bad or unpleasant. It implies a strong feeling of disgust or disdain towards the subject.

  • For example, “The food at that restaurant was execrable.”
  • A person might say, “I find his taste in music execrable.”
  • In a review of a movie, someone might write, “The acting in the film was execrable and ruined the overall experience.”

56. Disdainful

This term describes someone who shows a strong feeling of dislike or disapproval towards someone or something. It implies a lack of respect or regard for the person or thing being talked about.

  • For example, “She gave him a disdainful look and walked away.”
  • In a conversation about a disliked celebrity, one might say, “I have a disdainful opinion of their work.”
  • A person might comment, “His disdainful attitude towards authority often gets him in trouble.”

57. Reputed

This word is used to describe someone or something that is widely believed or known to have a particular quality or characteristic, usually negative. It suggests that the reputation or status is based on rumor or hearsay rather than concrete evidence.

  • For instance, “He is a reputed criminal in the neighborhood.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial figure, one might say, “The reputed actions of that politician have caused quite a stir.”
  • A news article might mention, “The reputed gang leader was arrested in a major operation.”

58. Outcast

An outcast is someone who is rejected or excluded from a social group or community. It implies a sense of isolation and being an outsider. “Pariah” is a more intense synonym for outcast, emphasizing a person who is despised or shunned by society.

  • For example, “After the incident, he became an outcast among his former friends.”
  • In a conversation about social dynamics, one might say, “She was always treated like an outcast in high school.”
  • A person might comment, “He was seen as a pariah in the industry after his scandalous behavior.”

59. Discredited

When something or someone is discredited, it means their reputation or credibility has been undermined or called into question. It suggests that the person or thing is no longer trusted or believed to be reliable. “Debunked” is a similar term used specifically when exposing a false belief or myth.

  • For instance, “The scientist’s theories were discredited after further research.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial study, one might say, “The findings have since been debunked by other researchers.”
  • A news article might mention, “The politician’s claims were discredited by multiple fact-checking organizations.”