Top 42 Slang For Now – Meaning & Usage

Slang For Now is constantly evolving, with new phrases and expressions popping up in everyday conversations. Keeping up with the latest trends can be a challenge, but fear not, our team is here to help you navigate through the ever-changing world of modern language. Get ready to brush up on your slang game and stay ahead of the curve with our curated list of the hottest slang terms that are dominating the scene right now. Let’s dive in and explore the language of today!

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1. RN

This acronym is used to indicate that something is happening or is true at this very moment. It is often used in text messages or online conversations.

  • For example, “I’m busy RN, can’t talk.”
  • A person might say, “I’m hungry RN, let’s grab some food.”
  • Another might text, “I’m so tired RN, need to get some sleep.”

2. ATM

Similar to “RN,” this acronym is used to indicate that something is happening or is true at this particular moment. It can be used interchangeably with “RN.”

  • For instance, “I’m really busy ATM, can’t chat.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not feeling well ATM, need to rest.”
  • Another might text, “I’m studying ATM, can’t go out tonight.”

3. IMHO

This acronym is used to preface a statement or opinion to indicate that it is the speaker’s personal viewpoint. It is often used in online discussions or forums.

  • For example, “IMHO, the movie wasn’t that great.”
  • A person might say, “IMHO, pineapple does belong on pizza.”
  • Another might comment, “IMHO, the new album is a masterpiece.”

4. TBH

This acronym is used to preface a statement or opinion to indicate that the speaker is being sincere or straightforward. It is often used to share a genuine thought or feeling.

  • For instance, “TBH, I don’t really like that restaurant.”
  • A person might say, “TBH, I think your outfit looks amazing.”
  • Another might comment, “TBH, I’m not a fan of that TV show.”

5. FYI

This acronym is used to share information or give a heads-up to someone. It is often used in emails or text messages.

  • For example, “FYI, the meeting has been rescheduled to tomorrow.”
  • A person might say, “FYI, the restaurant only accepts cash.”
  • Another might text, “FYI, there’s heavy traffic on the highway.”

6. BTW

This is a common abbreviation used to introduce additional information or a side comment in a conversation. It is often used to add something extra to the main topic being discussed.

  • For instance, “BTW, did you hear about the new restaurant opening downtown?”
  • In a text message, someone might say, “BTW, I forgot to tell you that I won’t be able to make it to the party.”
  • During a meeting, a person might interject, “BTW, I have some important updates to share before we move on.”

7. ASAP

ASAP is an acronym that stands for “As Soon As Possible.” It is commonly used to convey urgency and the need for immediate action or response.

  • For example, a boss might say, “I need that report ASAP.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “Can you pick up some groceries on your way home? I need them ASAP.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Please submit your assignment ASAP, as the deadline is approaching.”

8. TTYL

TTYL is a phrase used to indicate that the speaker will talk to the other person at a later time or date. It is often used as a casual way to end a conversation or to say goodbye.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I have to go now. TTYL!”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I’ll be busy for the next few hours. TTYL!”
  • A coworker might say, “I’ll finish up this project and then catch up with you later. TTYL!”

9. LMK

LMK is a shorthand phrase used to ask someone to inform the speaker or provide them with information. It is often used to request updates or to ask for confirmation.

  • For example, a friend might say, “If you’re free tomorrow, LMK and we can hang out.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “Can you LMK if the meeting has been rescheduled?”
  • A coworker might ask, “LMK if you need any help with that task.”

10. IDK

IDK is an abbreviation used to express uncertainty or lack of knowledge about a particular topic. It is often used as a response when someone asks a question and the speaker does not have the answer.

  • For instance, a friend might ask, “What time does the movie start?” and the person might respond, “IDK.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “IDK where we should go for dinner tonight.”
  • A student might say, “IDK the answer to that math problem. Can you help me?”

11. ICYMI

Used to share something that someone may have missed or overlooked. It’s a way to catch someone up on important or interesting information.

  • For instance, “ICYMI, there was a major announcement about the new iPhone yesterday.”
  • A user might post, “ICYMI, the latest episode of our favorite TV show aired last night.”
  • Another might say, “ICYMI, there’s a sale happening at your favorite store this weekend.”

12. SMH

Expresses disappointment, disbelief, or frustration in response to something. It’s often used to convey disapproval or annoyance.

  • For example, “SMH, I can’t believe they canceled the concert at the last minute.”
  • A user might comment, “SMH, people need to learn how to park properly.”
  • Another might say, “SMH, why do people still believe in conspiracy theories?”

13. NVM

Used to indicate that something previously mentioned is no longer relevant or important. It’s a way to dismiss or retract a previous statement or question.

  • For instance, “NVM, I found the answer to my question.”
  • A user might comment, “NVM, I figured it out on my own.”
  • Another might say, “NVM, forget what I said earlier, it doesn’t matter anymore.”

14. GTG

Indicates that someone has to leave or end a conversation. It’s a way to let others know that you need to go or that you’ll be unavailable.

  • For example, “GTG, I have a meeting in 5 minutes.”
  • A user might comment, “GTG, time to catch my train.”
  • Another might say, “GTG, my phone is about to die.”

15. BRB

Informs others that someone will be momentarily away from the conversation or activity, but will return shortly.

  • For instance, “BRB, I need to grab a snack from the kitchen.”
  • A user might comment, “BRB, I have to answer the door.”
  • Another might say, “BRB, just need to use the restroom.”

16. TBA

This acronym is used to indicate that a specific event or information will be announced in the future. It is often used when the details are not yet confirmed or finalized.

  • For example, “The release date for the new movie is still TBA.”
  • A company might announce, “Stay tuned for our TBA product launch.”
  • A concert promoter might say, “We have some exciting TBA surprises for our upcoming music festival.”

17. TBC

Similar to TBA, TBC is used to indicate that a specific event or information is not yet confirmed. It suggests that further confirmation is needed before the details can be shared.

  • For instance, “The location for the conference is still TBC.”
  • A sports team might announce, “The starting lineup for the game is TBC.”
  • A travel agency might say, “The exact departure time is TBC, but we will update you soon.”

18. TBD

TBD is used when a decision or outcome is not yet known or finalized. It implies that further evaluation or consideration is required before a definitive answer can be provided.

  • For example, “The winner of the competition is still TBD.”
  • A project manager might say, “The budget for the project is TBD.”
  • An event organizer might announce, “The schedule for the conference is still TBD.”

19. FOMO

This term describes the feeling of anxiety or unease that someone might experience when they believe they are missing out on exciting or interesting experiences happening around them.

  • For instance, “I didn’t go to the party because I had serious FOMO.”
  • A friend might say, “You have to come with us, don’t let FOMO get the best of you!”
  • Someone might post on social media, “Everyone seems to be having so much fun without me, total FOMO right now.”

20. YOLO

YOLO is a phrase used to express the idea that life is short and should be lived to the fullest. It often encourages people to take risks or seize opportunities without worrying about the potential consequences.

  • For example, “I’m going skydiving tomorrow because YOLO!”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s book that spontaneous trip, YOLO!”
  • A person might post on social media, “Trying something new today because YOLO!”

21. BFF

This acronym is used to refer to a close friend or someone with whom you share a strong bond. It is often used affectionately and humorously.

  • For example, “I’m going shopping with my BFF this weekend.”
  • A person might say, “My BFF always knows how to make me laugh.”
  • Someone might post a picture with their best friend and caption it, “Me and my BFF, partners in crime!”

22. NGL

This abbreviation is used to preface a statement that may be considered surprising or unexpected. It is often used to provide honesty and authenticity in a conversation.

  • For instance, “NGL, I didn’t enjoy that movie as much as I thought I would.”
  • A person might say, “NGL, I’m really nervous about the upcoming presentation.”
  • Someone might comment on a social media post, “NGL, that outfit looks amazing on you!”

23. FWIW

This acronym is used to preface a statement or opinion that may not hold much value or significance, but is shared for the sake of providing information or perspective.

  • For example, “FWIW, I’ve heard that restaurant has great reviews.”
  • A person might say, “FWIW, I think we should consider a different approach to this problem.”
  • Someone might comment on a discussion thread, “FWIW, I’ve had a similar experience and it didn’t turn out well.”

24. WBU

This abbreviation is used to ask someone for their opinion or response after sharing your own thoughts or experiences.

  • For instance, “I had a great day at the beach. WBU?”
  • A person might ask, “I’m thinking of ordering pizza for dinner. WBU?”
  • Someone might comment on a social media post, “Just finished reading a great book. WBU? Any recommendations?”

25. BFFN

This acronym is used to refer to a close friend with whom you currently share a strong bond, but may not be as close in the future. It implies that the friendship may change or evolve over time.

  • For example, “We’re BFFN. We’ll always have these memories, but we’re going our separate ways.”
  • A person might say, “I know we won’t be in the same city anymore, but let’s cherish our BFFN status.”
  • Someone might comment on a photo with a friend who is moving away, “Going to miss you, BFFN. Keep in touch!”

26. TTYN

This acronym is used to indicate that the speaker has no interest in further communication with the recipient. It is often used in a sarcastic or dismissive manner.

  • For example, someone might respond to an annoying message with, “TTYN, loser.”
  • A person might use this acronym to end a conversation abruptly, saying, “I have better things to do. TTYN.”
  • In a joking context, a friend might say, “You’re being annoying. TTYN, forever!”

27. N

A shortened version of the word “now,” used to indicate that something should be done immediately or without delay.

  • For instance, a boss might send a message saying, “Finish the report. N!”
  • A friend might text, “I’m outside. N, let’s go!”
  • In a hurry, someone might say, “We need to leave N, or we’ll be late.”

28. 24/7

A phrase used to indicate that something is available or happening all the time, without interruption.

  • For example, a business might advertise, “We’re open 24/7!”
  • A person might say, “I’m here to support you 24/7.”
  • In a discussion about a TV show, someone might comment, “I binge-watched it, 24/7!”

29. Pronto

An Italian word meaning “quick” or “prompt,” often used in English to convey a sense of urgency or the need for immediate action.

  • For instance, a boss might say, “I need that report pronto!”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Clean your room, pronto.”
  • In a hurry, someone might say, “We need to leave pronto, or we’ll miss the train.”

30. Stat

A medical term meaning “immediately” or “without delay,” often used in a humorous or exaggerated manner outside of the medical context.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “We need to get this patient to the operating room stat!”
  • A person might say, “I need coffee stat, or I won’t make it through the day.”
  • In a stressful situation, someone might exclaim, “We need a solution, and we need it stat!”

31. PDQ

This phrase is an abbreviation for “pretty darn quick” and is used to describe something that needs to be done or completed quickly. It emphasizes the urgency and speed of the action.

  • For instance, a boss might say, “I need that report finished PDQ.”
  • If someone is in a hurry, they might ask, “Can you get me there PDQ?”
  • A person might say, “I’ll be back PDQ, just need to grab something from my car.”

32. In a Jiffy

This phrase means to do something in a short amount of time or to complete a task promptly. It is often used to express efficiency and speed.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I’ll be there in a jiffy.”
  • If someone asks for help, another person might respond, “I’ll fix it for you in a jiffy.”
  • A person might say, “I can finish this project in a jiffy, no problem.”

33. In the Blink of an Eye

This phrase is used to emphasize the speed at which something happens. It suggests that something occurs so quickly that it is almost imperceptible, like the blink of an eye.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The car disappeared in the blink of an eye.”
  • If a person is amazed by how fast someone completed a task, they might say, “He finished it in the blink of an eye!”
  • A person might say, “Time flies in the blink of an eye, so make the most of every moment.”

34. Today

This word refers to the present day, the day on which something is happening or being discussed. It is often used to indicate immediacy or to emphasize that something is happening in the present.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need to finish this project today.”
  • If someone asks about plans, another person might respond, “I’m busy today, but I’m free tomorrow.”
  • A person might say, “Today is the day I finally start my new exercise routine.”

35. This Second

This phrase is used to emphasize the immediate nature of an action or request. It suggests that something needs to happen or be done immediately, without any delay.

  • For instance, a parent might say to a child, “Clean your room this second!”
  • If someone is in a rush, they might ask, “Can you do it this second?”
  • A person might say, “I need that document signed this second, it’s urgent!”

36. This Minute

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is happening at this very moment. It expresses a sense of urgency or immediacy.

  • For example, “I need you to finish that report this minute!”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Clean up your room this minute.”
  • In a conversation about a deadline, someone might say, “We have to submit the proposal this minute or we’ll miss the opportunity.”

37. This Instant

Similar to “this minute,” this phrase is used to emphasize that something is happening immediately, without any delay.

  • For instance, “I want you to apologize to your sister this instant!”
  • In a movie scene, a character might shout, “Drop your weapon this instant!”
  • A boss might say to an employee, “I need that report on my desk this instant.”

38. This Moment

This phrase is used to refer to the present time, emphasizing that something needs to be done or attended to immediately.

  • For example, “We need to address this issue right at this moment.”
  • In a conversation about a decision, someone might say, “I can’t make up my mind at this moment.”
  • A friend might say to another, “I need your support right now, in this moment.”

39. This Very Second

This phrase is used to emphasize that something needs to happen immediately, with no delay or hesitation. It expresses a sense of urgency and importance.

  • For instance, “Call the doctor this very second; it’s an emergency!”
  • In a conversation about a deadline, someone might say, “We have to finish the project this very second.”
  • A coach might shout to their team, “Score a goal this very second!”

40. This Very Minute

Similar to “this very second,” this phrase is used to emphasize the need for immediate action or attention. It conveys a sense of urgency and importance.

  • For example, “I need you to come to my office this very minute!”
  • In a discussion about a task, someone might say, “We have to complete it this very minute.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Put away your phones this very minute!”

41. This Very Instant

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is happening or should happen immediately. It indicates a sense of urgency or immediacy.

  • For example, if someone is waiting for a response, they might say, “I need to hear back from you this very instant.”
  • In a fast-paced situation, someone might shout, “We need to move this very instant!”
  • When expressing excitement, a person might exclaim, “I want that ice cream right now, this very instant!”

42. This Very Moment

Similar to “This Very Instant,” this phrase is used to emphasize that something is happening or should happen immediately. It conveys a sense of urgency or immediacy.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need you to come to the office this very moment.”
  • In a dramatic situation, a character might declare, “I will not wait any longer. I want my money this very moment!”
  • When expressing impatience, a person might exclaim, “I can’t wait any longer. I need to eat this very moment!”
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