Top 35 Slang For Number – Meaning & Usage

Numbers are an integral part of our daily lives, but did you know there are slang terms used to refer to them in a more casual and fun way? From street smarts to online conversations, we’ve got you covered with a compilation of the top slang for numbers that will make you look like a pro in no time. Join us as we break down these quirky terms and add a touch of flair to your numerical vocabulary!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Uno

“Uno” is a Spanish word that means “one.” It is often used as a slang term for the number one.

  • For example, in a card game, a player might say, “I only need uno more card to win.”
  • A person counting items might say, “I have uno, dos, tres pencils.”
  • In a conversation about a competition, someone might say, “He finished in first place, uno.”

2. Deuce

A slang term for the number two. It is often used in card games and sports to refer to the number two.

  • For instance, in tennis, a player might say, “I won the first set 6-4, then lost the second set 7-6 (7-2 in the tiebreaker).”
  • In a game of poker, a player might say, “I have a pair of deuces.”
  • Two friends deciding on a meeting time might say, “Let’s meet at deuce o’clock.”

3. Trey

A slang term for the number three. It is often used in card games and dice games to refer to the number three.

  • For example, in a game of craps, a player might say, “I rolled a trey, which means I lost.”
  • In a card game, a player might say, “I have a trey of hearts.”
  • Three friends deciding on a group activity might say, “Let’s meet up for some trey-on-trey basketball.”

4. Quad

Short for “quadruple,” “quad” is a slang term for the number four. It is often used in reference to four of something.

  • For instance, in a college dorm, someone might say, “I live in quad 4B.”
  • A person talking about a car might say, “That vehicle has quad exhaust pipes.”
  • In a discussion about a sports team, someone might say, “He scored a quad of goals in the game.”

5. Cinco

A Spanish word for the number five, “cinco” is often used as a slang term for the number five.

  • For example, in a countdown, someone might say, “Cinco, cuatro, tres, dos, uno, blast off!”
  • A person counting fingers might say, “I have uno, dos, tres, cuatro, cinco fingers.”
  • In a conversation about a five-course meal, someone might say, “I enjoyed the appetizer, soup, salad, main course, and dessert – cinco courses in total!”

6. Siete

In Spanish, “siete” translates to the number seven. It is often used as slang to refer to the number seven in English as well.

  • For instance, “I’ll meet you at the park at siete o’clock.”
  • In a game of cards, someone might say, “I have siete cards left.”
  • A person counting items might say, “I need siete more to complete the set.”

7. Ocho

Similar to “siete,” “ocho” is the Spanish word for the number eight. It is commonly used as slang for the number eight in English as well.

  • For example, “I’ll be there around ocho in the evening.”
  • In a discussion about a sports team, someone might say, “They scored ocho goals in the last game.”
  • A person counting items might say, “I have ocho items on my shopping list.”

8. Nueve

Continuing the trend, “nueve” is the Spanish word for the number nine. It is often used as slang to refer to the number nine in English as well.

  • For instance, “I’ll call you at nueve o’clock.”
  • In a conversation about a group of friends, someone might say, “There were nueve of us at the party.”
  • A person counting items might say, “I have nueve items to pack for my trip.”

9. Tenner

The term “tenner” is slang for the number ten. It is commonly used in informal conversations to refer to the number ten.

  • For example, “I’ll be there in a tenner” means “I’ll be there in ten minutes.”
  • In a discussion about a score in a game, someone might say, “They won by a tenner.”
  • A person counting items might say, “I need a tenner more to complete the set.”

10. Dozen

While not directly referring to the number ten, “dozen” is slang for the number twelve. It is commonly used to refer to a group or quantity of twelve items.

  • For instance, “I bought a dozen eggs from the store.”
  • In a conversation about a bakery, someone might say, “They sell a dozen donuts for a discounted price.”
  • A person counting items might say, “I need a dozen more to complete the order.”

11. Baker’s Dozen

A baker’s dozen refers to a group of thirteen items, typically baked goods, instead of the standard twelve. The term originated from a practice where bakers would add an extra item to a dozen to ensure that customers received the full amount.

  • For example, “I ordered a dozen donuts, but the baker gave me a baker’s dozen, so I got thirteen.”
  • In a discussion about portion sizes, someone might mention, “A baker’s dozen is a common practice in bakeries to give customers a little extra.”
  • A person might use the term metaphorically and say, “I always give a baker’s dozen of compliments to boost someone’s confidence.”

12. Score

The term “score” is a slang term for the number twenty. It originated from Old English and is still used today, particularly in informal contexts or historical references.

  • For instance, in Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, he famously said, “Four score and seven years ago,” referring to eighty-seven years.
  • In a conversation about the number of years since a significant event, someone might say, “It’s been three score years since that historic day.”
  • A person might use the term humorously and say, “I can’t believe I’m almost two score years old!”

13. Quarter

A quarter is a slang term for the number twenty-five. It is commonly used in informal contexts and is derived from the fact that a quarter of one hundred is twenty-five.

  • For example, in a discussion about a person’s age, someone might say, “I’m in my mid-quarter years.”
  • In a sporting event, a commentator might mention, “The team is down by a quarter, but there’s still plenty of time to make a comeback.”
  • A person might use the term casually and say, “I owe you a quarter for the soda.”

14. Half a Century

“Half a century” is a slang term for the number fifty. It refers to a period of fifty years, which is half of a century.

  • For instance, when celebrating a person’s fiftieth birthday, someone might say, “Welcome to the club of half a century!”
  • In a discussion about the passage of time, a person might mention, “I can’t believe it’s been half a century since that historic event.”
  • A person might use the term humorously and say, “I’ve been around for half a century, and I still feel young at heart!”

15. Grand

In slang, “grand” is a term used to refer to the number one thousand. It is commonly used in informal contexts, particularly in financial or monetary discussions.

  • For example, if someone is talking about the cost of a car, they might say, “It’s worth twenty grand.”
  • In a discussion about a person’s salary, someone might mention, “I make six grand a month.”
  • A person might use the term casually and say, “I saved up a grand for my vacation.”

16. K

In slang, “K” is used to represent the number one thousand. It comes from the abbreviation of the word “kilo,” which is used to denote a thousand in various contexts.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just hit 10K followers on Instagram!”
  • In a conversation about money, a person might mention, “That car costs 20K.”
  • Another might say, “I need to save up 5K for my vacation.”

17. Milly

The term “Milly” is a slang abbreviation for the number one million. It is used to represent a large quantity or amount.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I just won the lottery and became a Milly-aire!”
  • In a discussion about population, someone might mention, “The city has over 2 Milly residents.”
  • Another might say, “I need to sell a Milly copies of my book to be considered a bestseller.”

18. Billy

“Billy” is a slang term used to represent the number one billion. It is often used to describe an extremely large quantity or amount.

  • For example, a person might say, “That company is worth several Billy dollars.”
  • In a conversation about wealth, someone might mention, “I wish I had a Billy in my bank account.”
  • Another might say, “The national debt is over 20 Billy dollars.”

19. Zilch

In slang, “Zilch” is used to represent the number zero. It is often used to indicate a lack of something or an absence of quantity.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have zilch interest in that movie.”
  • In a discussion about options, a person might mention, “I’ve got zilch plans for the weekend.”
  • Another might say, “After searching for hours, I found zilch information on that topic.”

20. Double-Oh

The term “Double-Oh” is slang for the number zero. It is often used to emphasize the idea of absolute nothingness or emptiness.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been waiting for double-oh minutes and still no sign of them.”
  • In a conversation about scores, a person might mention, “The opposing team has been held to double-oh points.”
  • Another might say, “I thought I had some cash, but my wallet was double-oh.”

21. Century

In slang, “century” is often used to refer to the number 100. It is derived from the fact that a century is equal to 100 years.

  • For example, someone might say, “I ran a century (100 miles) in a single day.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “He just scored his century (100 runs) in the match.”
  • A person discussing a milestone might say, “I finally hit a century (100 followers) on my social media account.”

22. G

In slang, “G” is often used to refer to the number 1,000. It is derived from the word “grand,” which is a term for 1,000.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just made a G (1,000 dollars) from selling my old stuff.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might ask, “Can you lend me a G (1,000 dollars)?”
  • A person discussing their savings might say, “I managed to save up a G (1,000 dollars) for my vacation.”

23. Large

In slang, “large” is often used to refer to the number 1,000. It is derived from the fact that “large” is a synonym for “big” or “great,” indicating a large quantity.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just won a large (1,000 dollars) in the lottery.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “I owe you a large (1,000 dollars) for that favor.”
  • A person discussing a large quantity might say, “I have a large (1,000 followers) on my social media account.”

24. Hundo

In slang, “hundo” is often used to refer to the number 100. It is a shortened form of the word “hundred.”

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just scored a hundo (100 points) in the game.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “I need to pay you back a hundo (100 dollars) for that loan.”
  • A person discussing a milestone might say, “I finally hit a hundo (100 subscribers) on my YouTube channel.”

25. Niner

In slang, “niner” is often used to refer to the number 9. It is derived from the fact that “niner” sounds similar to “nine.”

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to leave work at niner (9 o’clock) tonight.”
  • In a conversation about quantity, someone might say, “I only have a niner (9 items) left in stock.”
  • A person discussing a countdown might say, “We’re at a niner (9 days) until the big event.”

26. Triple

This slang term refers to the number three or something that is multiplied by three.

  • For example, “I hit a triple in the baseball game.”
  • A person might say, “I tripled the recipe to make more servings.”
  • In gaming, a player might boast, “I got a triple kill in that round.”

27. Fiver

This term is used to refer to a five-dollar bill or anything that costs five dollars.

  • For instance, “Can you lend me a fiver until payday?”
  • A person might say, “I found a fiver on the ground, lucky me!”
  • In a conversation about prices, someone might mention, “I got this shirt for a fiver at the thrift store.”

28. Ten-Spot

This slang term is used to refer to a ten-dollar bill or anything that costs ten dollars.

  • For example, “Can you lend me a ten-spot? I forgot my wallet.”
  • A person might say, “I found a ten-spot in my jacket pocket, what a pleasant surprise!”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might mention, “I try to save at least one ten-spot each week.”

29. Twenty-Spot

This term is used to refer to a twenty-dollar bill or anything that costs twenty dollars.

  • For instance, “I need a twenty-spot to cover my share of the bill.”
  • A person might say, “I found a twenty-spot in my old jeans, jackpot!”
  • In a conversation about prices, someone might mention, “I got these shoes for a twenty-spot on sale.”

30. Sizzle

This term is used to refer to the number zero, often in the context of scores or results.

  • For example, “The home team scored a sizzle in the game.”
  • A person might say, “I’m sorry, but your answer is a sizzle, not correct.”
  • In a discussion about statistics, someone might mention, “The company’s earnings took a sizzle this quarter.”

31. Heaven

In some cultures, the number 666 is associated with the devil or evil. The term “heaven” is often used as a euphemism for the number 666, as it is the opposite of evil or hell.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m not afraid of the devil, I’m living on heaven.”
  • In a discussion about superstitions, a person might mention, “Some people believe that seeing the number 666 is a sign of bad luck or evil, but I see it as heaven.”
  • A person jokingly referring to the number might say, “I’ve got three sixes on my test, so I’m living on heaven right now.”

32. Snowman

The term “snowman” is a slang term for the number 30. The number 30 resembles a snowman with a rounded head and a straight body.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just turned snowman, and I’m feeling great!”
  • In a conversation about age, a person might mention, “I remember when I was just a snowman.”
  • A person discussing time might say, “I’ll see you at snowman o’clock.”

33. Cloud 9

The term “cloud 9” is used to refer to the number 9. It is derived from the saying “on cloud nine,” which means to be extremely happy or elated.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m feeling like I’m on cloud 9 after winning the lottery.”
  • In a discussion about favorite numbers, a person might mention, “My lucky number is cloud 9.”
  • A person jokingly referring to the number might say, “I’m not just a regular 9, I’m on cloud 9.”

34. Dime

The term “dime” is slang for the number 10. It comes from the fact that a dime is worth 10 cents.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll be there at dime o’clock.”
  • In a conversation about counting, a person might mention, “I just need to add a dime more to reach 10.”
  • A person jokingly referring to the number might say, “I’m not just a regular 10, I’m a perfect dime.”

35. Sweet 16

The term “sweet 16” is used to refer to the number 16. It is often associated with a milestone birthday celebration for a young person turning 16 years old.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t wait to celebrate my sweet 16 next month.”
  • In a discussion about age, a person might mention, “I remember when I was just a sweet 16.”
  • A person jokingly referring to the number might say, “I’m not just a regular 16, I’m a sweet 16.”
See also  Top 46 Slang For Prominent – Meaning & Usage