Top 80 Slang For Obligated – Meaning & Usage

Feeling obligated to keep up with the latest slang? We’ve got you covered. From “must-do” to “have-to,” our team has curated a list of the top slang terms for feeling obligated that will have you nodding in agreement and maybe even laughing at how relatable they are. Stay tuned to level up your slang game and never feel lost in conversation again!

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1. Bound

When someone is bound, they are compelled or obligated to do something. It implies a sense of duty or responsibility.

  • For example, “I am bound by my contract to complete this project on time.”
  • In a conversation about responsibilities, someone might say, “We are all bound to contribute to the success of this team.”
  • A person discussing legal obligations might mention, “Once you sign the agreement, you are bound by its terms.”

2. Duty-bound

Being duty-bound means that someone is morally or legally obligated to do something. It suggests a strong sense of responsibility or commitment.

  • For instance, “As a doctor, I am duty-bound to provide the best possible care to my patients.”
  • In a discussion about military service, someone might say, “Soldiers are duty-bound to protect their country.”
  • A person discussing personal values might state, “I am duty-bound to always act with integrity.”

3. Beholden

When someone is beholden, they are indebted or obligated to someone else. It implies a sense of gratitude or dependency.

  • For example, “I am beholden to my parents for their support throughout my education.”
  • In a conversation about favors, someone might say, “I am beholden to my friend for helping me move.”
  • A person discussing a mentor might mention, “I am beholden to them for guiding me in my career.”

4. Under the gun

Being under the gun means being under pressure or facing a deadline. It suggests a sense of urgency or obligation to act quickly.

  • For instance, “We are under the gun to finish this project before the end of the week.”
  • In a discussion about time management, someone might say, “I work best when I am under the gun.”
  • A person discussing a difficult situation might state, “We were under the gun to make a decision with limited information.”

5. In hock

Being in hock means being in debt or owing someone money. It suggests a financial obligation or dependency.

  • For example, “I am in hock to the bank for my mortgage.”
  • In a conversation about loans, someone might say, “I don’t want to be in hock to anyone.”
  • A person discussing financial struggles might mention, “I am in hock to my credit card company and struggling to pay off my debt.”

6. Indebted

When someone is indebted, it means they owe someone a favor or a debt and are obligated to repay it.

  • For example, “I’m indebted to my friend for helping me move.”
  • A person might say, “I feel indebted to my parents for all their support.”
  • Someone might express their gratitude by saying, “I’m forever indebted to you for your kindness.”

7. On the hook

Being on the hook means being responsible or obligated to do something.

  • For instance, “I’m on the hook for organizing the company event.”
  • A person might say, “I’m on the hook for finishing this project on time.”
  • Someone might express their frustration by saying, “Why am I always on the hook for cleaning up after everyone else?”

8. Tied up

When someone is tied up, it means they are busy or occupied with something and unable to do other things.

  • For example, “I can’t meet for lunch today, I’m tied up with work.”
  • A person might say, “Sorry, I’m tied up with appointments all day.”
  • Someone might explain, “I can’t go to the party, I’m tied up with family commitments.”

9. In thrall

Being in thrall means being under someone’s control or influence, often in a negative or oppressive way.

  • For instance, “She was in thrall to her manipulative partner.”
  • A person might say, “I feel like I’m in thrall to my boss’s demands.”
  • Someone might express their desire for freedom by saying, “I want to break free from this in thrall relationship.”

10. Indentured

When someone is indentured, it means they are bound by a contract or obligation, often involving work or service.

  • For example, “He was indentured to his master as an apprentice.”
  • A person might say, “I feel indentured to this job because of the contract.”
  • Someone might explain, “In the past, many immigrants were indentured servants in exchange for passage to a new country.”

11. Constrained

To be limited or restricted in one’s actions or choices. “Constrained” implies a lack of freedom or flexibility.

  • For example, a person might say, “I feel so constrained by my job. I can’t pursue my true passions.”
  • In a discussion about personal finances, someone might mention, “I’m constrained by my student loan debt.”
  • A character in a book might feel constrained by societal expectations and say, “I long to break free from the constraints of this rigid society.”

12. In service

To be actively engaged in one’s responsibilities or obligations. “In service” often refers to being on duty or working.

  • For instance, a military member might say, “I am currently in service and stationed overseas.”
  • In a customer service context, someone might ask, “Is there anyone in service who can assist me?”
  • A person discussing their job might say, “I’m in service as a nurse, taking care of patients every day.”

13. In debt

To owe money to someone or something. “In debt” implies a financial obligation that needs to be repaid.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m in debt from my student loans.”
  • In a discussion about personal finance, someone might mention, “Being in debt can be a heavy burden.”
  • A character in a movie might say, “I’m in debt to the mob, and they’re coming after me.”

14. Pledged

To make a formal or solemn promise or commitment to do something. “Pledged” implies a strong commitment or dedication to fulfilling an obligation.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I pledged to donate a portion of my salary to charity.”
  • In a discussion about marriage, someone might mention, “When we got engaged, we pledged to love and support each other.”
  • A character in a book might pledge their loyalty to a cause or organization by saying, “I hereby pledge my allegiance to the Resistance.”

15. Committed

To be fully dedicated or devoted to a particular course of action or responsibility. “Committed” implies a strong sense of duty or loyalty.

  • For example, a person might say, “I am committed to my fitness goals and work out every day.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might mention, “Both partners need to be committed to making the relationship work.”
  • A character in a movie might say, “I am committed to seeking justice for my family, no matter the cost.”

16. In duty

When someone is “in duty,” it means they are obligated or required to do something. This phrase often implies a sense of responsibility or duty towards a task or role.

  • For example, a soldier might say, “I am in duty to protect my country.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might tell an employee, “You are in duty to complete this project by the end of the day.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “You are in duty to clean your room before you can go out and play.”

17. Enslaved

While “enslaved” typically refers to being held in slavery, it can also be used metaphorically to convey a strong sense of obligation or being bound to do something against one’s will.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I feel enslaved to my job, always working long hours.”
  • In a relationship, a person might feel “enslaved” by their partner’s demands or expectations.
  • A student might say, “I feel enslaved to my schoolwork, always studying and never having free time.”

18. Tethered

When someone is “tethered,” it means they are constrained or restricted in their actions or choices, often due to an obligation or responsibility.

  • For example, a person might say, “I feel tethered to my phone, always checking emails and messages.”
  • In a job, an employee might feel “tethered” to their desk, unable to take breaks or leave the office.
  • A caregiver might feel “tethered” to their responsibilities,“tethered” to their responsibilities, unable to pursue personal interests or hobbies.

19. Under obligation

Being “under obligation” means that someone is required or compelled to do something, often due to a sense of duty or responsibility.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I am under obligation to attend my friend’s wedding.”
  • In a legal context, a person might be “under obligation” to pay their debts or fulfill a contract.
  • A student might feel “under obligation” to study and perform well in school.
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20. In the red

While “in the red” typically refers to being in debt or having financial obligations, it can also be used metaphorically to convey a sense of being obligated or indebted in other contexts.

  • For example, a person might say, “I am in the red with my work deadlines, so I can’t go out tonight.”
  • In a relationship, someone might feel “in the red” with their partner, owing them for past mistakes or actions.
  • A student might feel “in the red” with their academic workload,“in the red” with their academic workload, overwhelmed and struggling to keep up.

21. In the hole

This phrase is often used to describe someone who is financially obligated or owes a significant amount of money.

  • For example, “I can’t go on vacation this year, I’m in the hole from all my student loans.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in the hole after maxing out my credit cards.”
  • Another might complain, “I’ll never get out of the hole with all these bills to pay.”

22. On the line

This phrase is used to describe someone who is obligated to take action or face consequences.

  • For instance, “As the team captain, I’m on the line to lead us to victory.”
  • A person might say, “If I don’t meet the deadline, my job is on the line.”
  • Another might admit, “I’m on the line for making a mistake in the project.”

23. In the hot seat

This phrase is often used to describe someone who is obligated to answer difficult questions or face criticism.

  • For example, “The CEO was in the hot seat during the press conference.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in the hot seat for missing an important deadline.”
  • Another might confess, “I don’t want to be in the hot seat when the boss finds out about the mistake.”

24. On the spot

This phrase is used to describe someone who is obligated to act or make a decision quickly.

  • For instance, “The teacher put me on the spot by asking me to solve a difficult math problem.”
  • A person might say, “I was put on the spot when my boss asked me to give a presentation.”
  • Another might admit, “I don’t like being put on the spot because it makes me nervous.”

25. In a bind

This phrase is often used to describe someone who is obligated to find a solution to a problem or face negative consequences.

  • For example, “I’m in a bind because I have two conflicting appointments.”
  • A person might say, “We’re in a bind because we’re short-staffed for the event.”
  • Another might confess, “I need your help. I’m in a bind and don’t know what to do.”

26. In a pickle

This phrase is used to describe being in a predicament or facing a problem that is hard to solve.

  • For example, “I forgot my keys at home, and now I’m in a pickle.”
  • Another usage might be, “He got himself in a pickle by lying to his boss.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in a pickle because I have two conflicting appointments at the same time.”

27. On the clock

This phrase refers to the time when someone is actively working and being compensated for their labor.

  • For instance, “I’ll be on the clock from 9 AM to 5 PM.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t chat right now, I’m on the clock.”
  • Another usage might be, “I’m getting paid, so I need to be on the clock and focused.”

28. On the job

This phrase is used to describe someone who is actively engaged in their work or fulfilling their responsibilities.

  • For example, “He’s always on the job, even on weekends.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t join you for lunch, I’m on the job.”
  • Another usage might be, “She’s a dedicated employee who is always on the job.”

29. Under the thumb

This phrase is used to describe someone who is being controlled or influenced by another person, often in a negative or oppressive way.

  • For instance, “He’s completely under the thumb of his demanding boss.”
  • A person might say, “She’s under the thumb of her overbearing partner.”
  • Another usage might be, “They’re under the thumb of their strict parents.”

30. On the books

This phrase refers to something that is officially registered or recorded, usually in a formal or legal context.

  • For example, “The transaction is on the books and cannot be changed.”
  • A person might say, “The company’s financial records are all on the books.”
  • Another usage might be, “The contract is on the books and binding for both parties.”

31. In the loop

This phrase refers to being knowledgeable about a particular subject or situation. It suggests being included in the flow of information or being part of a group that is aware of what is happening.

  • For example, “As the project manager, I need to be in the loop about any changes.”
  • In a conversation about a new company policy, someone might ask, “Are you in the loop on this?”
  • A colleague might say, “Keep me in the loop if there are any updates on the project.”

32. In the know

This phrase describes being aware of confidential or exclusive information. It implies being part of a select group that is privy to certain knowledge or secrets.

  • For instance, “He’s always in the know about the latest gossip.”
  • When discussing upcoming events, someone might ask, “Are you in the know about the party next week?”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll fill you in on the details later, but right now, I need to keep you in the know.”

33. In the mix

This phrase indicates being actively engaged or included in a particular situation or activity. It suggests being part of a group or being present in a particular environment.

  • For example, “I want to be in the mix when they make the final decision.”
  • When discussing a social gathering, someone might ask, “Are you going to be in the mix at the party?”
  • A coworker might say, “Make sure you’re in the mix during the team meeting.”

34. In the game

This phrase conveys being knowledgeable, skilled, or ready to participate in a particular activity or situation. It implies being capable or having the necessary skills or information to succeed.

  • For instance, “I’ve been studying, so I’m definitely in the game for the upcoming test.”
  • When discussing a business opportunity, someone might ask, “Are you in the game for this project?”
  • A coach might say, “We need everyone to be in the game and give their best effort.”

35. In the ring

This phrase refers to being actively involved in a contest or conflict. It is often used in reference to sports or other competitive situations.

  • For example, “The two boxers are in the ring, ready to face off.”
  • When discussing a heated debate, someone might say, “I’m ready to get in the ring and defend my position.”
  • A fan might shout, “Come on, get in the ring and show them what you’ve got!”

36. On the case

This phrase means to be actively involved in solving a problem or completing a task. It implies that someone is dedicated and committed to finding a solution or making progress.

  • For example, a detective might say, “I’m on the case and will do everything I can to solve it.”
  • A manager might tell their team, “Let’s get on the case and find a solution to this issue.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you on the case to find a new job?”

37. On the move

This phrase refers to being in motion or actively making progress towards a goal. It implies that someone is taking action and not staying stagnant.

  • For instance, a business owner might say, “We’re on the move to expand our operations.”
  • A traveler might post on social media, “Always on the move, exploring new places.”
  • A friend might say, “I can’t stay still, always on the move and looking for the next adventure.”

38. On the go

This phrase means to be constantly busy or engaged in various activities. It implies that someone is always on the move and doesn’t have much free time.

  • For example, a parent might say, “With three kids, I’m always on the go.”
  • A busy professional might mention, “I have back-to-back meetings all day, constantly on the go.”
  • A friend might apologize, “Sorry if I seem distracted, I’ve been on the go since morning.”

39. On the ball

This phrase means to be alert, attentive, and ready to take action. It implies that someone is quick to understand and respond to situations.

  • For instance, a coach might say, “Our team needs to stay on the ball and react quickly.”
  • A teacher might praise a student, “You’re always on the ball and never miss important details.”
  • A friend might say, “I need you to be on the ball for this project, it’s time-sensitive.”

40. On the grind

This phrase refers to working hard and putting in a lot of effort to achieve success. It implies that someone is dedicated and focused on their goals.

  • For example, an entrepreneur might say, “I’m always on the grind, hustling to grow my business.”
  • A student might say, “Finals week is tough, but I’m on the grind to get good grades.”
  • A friend might encourage another, “Keep on the grind, success will come with hard work.”

41. Compelled

When someone feels compelled to do something, it means they are being forced or strongly influenced to do it. This can be due to external pressure or personal beliefs.

  • For example, “I felt compelled to speak up against injustice.”
  • In a situation where someone is being persuaded to do something they don’t want to do, they might say, “I feel compelled to go along with it, even though I don’t agree.”
  • A person might feel compelled to help a friend in need, saying, “I can’t ignore their plea for assistance.”

42. Owing

When someone is owing, it means they are obligated or indebted to someone. This can refer to a favor, money, or any other type of obligation.

  • For instance, “I’m owing my friend a favor for helping me move.”
  • In a discussion about financial responsibilities, someone might say, “I’m owing a significant amount on my credit card.”
  • A person might express their gratitude for someone’s help by saying, “I’m owing you big time for saving me from that situation.”

43. Required

When something is required, it means it is necessary or mandatory. This can refer to tasks, actions, or qualifications.

  • For example, “A valid ID is required to enter the venue.”
  • In a school setting, a student might ask, “Is this assignment required or optional?”
  • A person might say, “I’m required to wear a uniform at work.”

44. Obliged

When someone feels obliged, it means they feel morally or socially bound to do something. This can be due to a sense of duty or a feeling of indebtedness.

  • For instance, “I feel obliged to help my elderly neighbor with her groceries.”
  • In a situation where someone asks for a favor, a person might say, “I’m obliged to fulfill their request.”
  • A person might express their gratitude by saying, “I’m obliged for your assistance.”

45. Pressured

When someone feels pressured, it means they feel forced or influenced to do something. This can be due to external expectations, deadlines, or demands.

  • For example, “I feel pressured to meet the project deadline.”
  • In a discussion about peer influence, someone might say, “I felt pressured to go along with their decision.”
  • A person might express their frustration by saying, “I’m feeling pressured to make a decision without enough information.”

46. Coerced

This term refers to being compelled or pressured to do something against one’s will. It implies that there is a lack of choice or free will in the matter.

  • For example, “He was coerced into signing the contract under duress.”
  • In a discussion about personal decisions, someone might say, “I refuse to be coerced into doing something I don’t want to do.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I was coerced into attending the party even though I didn’t want to go.”

47. Mandated

When something is mandated, it means that it is officially ordered or commanded. It implies a sense of obligation and compliance with a set of rules or regulations.

  • For instance, “Face masks are mandated in public places to prevent the spread of COVID-19.”
  • In a conversation about government policies, someone might say, “Vaccinations should not be mandated; it should be a personal choice.”
  • A person discussing workplace regulations might say, “Safety training is mandated for all employees to ensure a secure work environment.”

48. Conscripted

This term refers to being forced into military service or being required to join the armed forces. It implies that one is obligated to serve in the military against their will.

  • For example, “During times of war, young men were conscripted into the army.”
  • In a discussion about military recruitment, someone might say, “I believe conscription should be abolished, and military service should be voluntary.”
  • A person sharing their family history might say, “My grandfather was conscripted during World War II and served in the infantry.”

49. Enjoined

To be enjoined means to be ordered or commanded to do something. It implies a sense of obligation and adherence to a specific instruction or requirement.

  • For instance, “The judge enjoined the defendant from contacting the victim.”
  • In a conversation about legal matters, someone might say, “The court can issue an injunction to enjoin certain actions.”
  • A person discussing workplace policies might say, “Employees are enjoined to follow the code of conduct to maintain a professional environment.”

50. Induced

When someone is induced to do something, they are compelled or motivated to take a particular action. It implies that there is a persuasive influence or external factor driving the obligation.

  • For example, “The reward induced him to work harder and meet the deadline.”
  • In a discussion about marketing tactics, someone might say, “Emotional appeals are often used to induce consumers to make a purchase.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “The inspiring speech induced me to pursue my dreams and take risks.”

51. Necessitated

This word is used to describe something that is necessary or required. It implies that there is no other choice or option.

  • For example, “The urgent situation necessitated immediate action.”
  • In a discussion about job requirements, one might say, “A college degree is often necessitated for higher-level positions.”
  • A person might explain, “The new law necessitated changes to existing policies.”

52. Urged

To “urge” someone means to strongly recommend or persuade them to do something. It implies a sense of importance or necessity.

  • For instance, “The doctor urged the patient to quit smoking for their health.”
  • In a conversation about taking action, one might say, “I urged my friend to join the protest.”
  • A person might recount, “I urged my family to go on a vacation together.”

53. Dictated

When something is “dictated,” it means that it is required or commanded. It implies that there is no choice or freedom in the matter.

  • For example, “The company policy dictated that all employees must wear a uniform.”
  • In a discussion about government regulations, one might say, “The law dictated that all vehicles must pass an emissions test.”
  • A person might explain, “The terms of the contract dictated the payment schedule.”

54. Impelled

To be “impelled” means to be driven or compelled to do something. It suggests a strong force or influence pushing towards a particular action.

  • For instance, “His love for music impelled him to pursue a career as a musician.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, one might say, “I felt impelled to learn a new skill.”
  • A person might recount, “The urgency of the situation impelled me to speak up.”

55. Bounden

“Bounden” is an archaic term that means obligated or duty-bound. It implies a strong sense of responsibility or commitment.

  • For example, “As a member of the team, he felt bounden to contribute his best.”
  • In a discussion about societal norms, one might say, “She felt bounden to follow traditional gender roles.”
  • A person might explain, “I consider it my bounden duty to help those in need.”

56. Coaxed

To be persuaded or urged to do something, often through gentle or persistent means.

  • For example, “My friends coaxed me into going skydiving even though I was scared.”
  • In a work context, a colleague might say, “I was coaxed into taking on extra projects because I couldn’t say no.”
  • Someone might say, “I coaxed my dog into learning new tricks by using treats as motivation.”

57. Co-opted

To take over or appropriate something, often without permission or by force.

  • For instance, “The company co-opted my idea and presented it as their own.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “The opposition party co-opted the government’s policies to gain support.”
  • A person might say, “I feel like my style has been co-opted by mainstream fashion trends.”

58. Enforced

To make sure that a rule or law is obeyed by using authority or punishment.

  • For example, “The school enforced a strict dress code.”
  • In a legal context, someone might say, “The judge enforced the maximum penalty for the crime.”
  • A person might say, “I had to enforce the rules at my job even though it made me unpopular.”

59. Imposed

To establish or enforce something, often against someone’s will.

  • For instance, “The government imposed a new tax on luxury goods.”
  • In a social context, someone might say, “My parents imposed a curfew on me when I was a teenager.”
  • A person might say, “I feel like society imposes unrealistic beauty standards on women.”

60. Urgent

Requiring immediate attention or action.

  • For example, “I have an urgent deadline for this project.”
  • In a medical context, a doctor might say, “This patient needs urgent treatment.”
  • Someone might say, “I received an urgent message from my boss asking me to come to the office immediately.”

61. Compulsory

Refers to something that is required or mandatory. It implies that there is no choice or option to opt out.

  • For example, “Attending the meeting is compulsory for all employees.”
  • In a school setting, a teacher might say, “Completing this assignment is compulsory, and it will be graded.”
  • A boss might inform their employees, “Wearing a uniform is compulsory in this workplace.”

62. Necessary

Indicates that something is essential or needed in order to achieve a certain outcome or meet a particular requirement.

  • For instance, “A good night’s sleep is necessary for optimal performance.”
  • In a conversation about cooking, someone might say, “Salt is a necessary ingredient in most recipes.”
  • A student might tell their friend, “Studying is necessary if you want to pass the exam.”

63. Requisite

Refers to something that is required as a condition or prerequisite for something else to happen or be achieved.

  • For example, “A bachelor’s degree is often a requisite for certain job positions.”
  • In a discussion about qualifications, someone might say, “Meeting the minimum age requirement is a requisite for getting a driver’s license.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “Physical fitness is a requisite for participating in this sport.”

64. Indispensable

Denotes something that is absolutely necessary or essential, to the point where it is impossible to function or achieve a desired outcome without it.

  • For instance, “Water is indispensable for human survival.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might say, “Smartphones have become indispensable in our daily lives.”
  • A manager might tell their team, “Effective communication is indispensable for a successful project.”

65. Vital

Signifies something that is extremely important or necessary for the success, well-being, or existence of something or someone.

  • For example, “Regular exercise is vital for maintaining good health.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, someone might say, “Open and honest communication is vital for a cohesive and productive team.”
  • A doctor might inform their patient, “Taking prescribed medication is vital for managing your condition.”

66. Crucial

This term is used to describe something that is extremely important or necessary. It implies that the action or task is crucial for a successful outcome.

  • For example, “Finishing this project on time is crucial for the success of the company.”
  • In a conversation about studying for exams, someone might say, “Getting enough sleep is crucial for retaining information.”
  • A manager might emphasize the importance of punctuality by saying, “Being on time for meetings is crucial for maintaining a productive work environment.”

67. Mandatory

This word is used to indicate that something is obligatory or necessary. It implies that there is a rule or expectation that must be followed.

  • For instance, “Wearing a seatbelt is mandatory while driving.”
  • In a discussion about school policies, someone might say, “Attendance is mandatory for all students.”
  • A company might have a policy stating, “Completing safety training is mandatory for all employees.”

68. Inescapable

This term is used to describe something that cannot be avoided or escaped. It implies that there is no way to evade or get out of the situation.

  • For example, “Death is an inescapable part of life.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult decision, someone might say, “Sometimes, facing the consequences is inescapable.”
  • A person discussing a challenging task might say, “The pressure to succeed is inescapable in this competitive industry.”

69. Inevitable

This word is used to describe something that is certain to happen or occur. It implies that the outcome is unavoidable or bound to occur.

  • For instance, “Change is inevitable in life.”
  • In a discussion about technological advancements, someone might say, “Automation is inevitable in many industries.”
  • A person reflecting on a breakup might say, “Heartbreak is inevitable when a relationship is no longer healthy.”

70. Unavoidable

This term is used to describe something that cannot be prevented or escaped. It implies that there is no way to avoid or evade the situation.

  • For example, “Conflict is unavoidable in any relationship.”
  • In a conversation about bad weather, someone might say, “Getting wet is unavoidable in this rain.”
  • A person discussing a difficult conversation might say, “Addressing the issue is unavoidable if we want to find a resolution.”

71. Ineluctable

This word is used to describe something that cannot be avoided or evaded. It implies a sense of inevitability and lack of choice.

  • For example, “The ineluctable consequences of his actions finally caught up with him.”
  • In a discussion about fate, someone might say, “We are all subject to the ineluctable forces of destiny.”
  • A person reflecting on a difficult decision might say, “I felt an ineluctable pull towards a different path, even though it was hard to accept.”

72. Unbending

This term refers to someone or something that is rigid and unwilling to change or compromise. It suggests a lack of adaptability or willingness to consider alternative options.

  • For instance, “Her unbending attitude made it difficult to reach a resolution.”
  • In a conversation about workplace policies, someone might say, “The company’s unbending rules stifled creativity and innovation.”
  • A person describing a strict parent might say, “My dad was unbending when it came to curfew and chores.”

73. Unyielding

This word describes someone or something that is resistant to change or pressure. It implies a strong and determined nature that refuses to give in or compromise.

  • For example, “He remained unyielding in his belief, even when faced with opposition.”
  • In a discussion about negotiations, someone might say, “Both parties were unyielding, which made reaching a compromise impossible.”
  • A person describing a difficult situation might say, “I faced an unyielding challenge that required me to push through and persevere.”

74. Inflexible

This term describes someone or something that is resistant to change or unable to adapt. It implies a lack of flexibility or adaptability in attitudes, behaviors, or policies.

  • For instance, “The company’s inflexible policies made it difficult for employees to find work-life balance.”
  • In a conversation about parenting styles, someone might say, “Being too inflexible can hinder a child’s development.”
  • A person reflecting on a failed relationship might say, “Our inflexible attitudes towards compromise ultimately led to our breakup.”

75. Unrelenting

This word describes something that continues without stopping or weakening. It implies a relentless and unwavering nature that does not give up or back down.

  • For example, “Despite facing numerous setbacks, she remained unrelenting in her pursuit of success.”
  • In a discussion about a challenging task, someone might say, “It requires unrelenting effort to achieve such a goal.”
  • A person describing a difficult boss might say, “He was unrelenting in his demands and expectations.”

76. Unswerving

This term refers to someone who is completely dedicated and unwavering in their obligations or responsibilities.

  • For example, “He is an unswerving employee who always goes above and beyond.”
  • In a discussion about loyalty, someone might say, “I am unswerving in my commitment to my family.”
  • A person describing a determined friend might say, “She is unswerving in her pursuit of her goals.”

77. Unwavering

This term describes someone who remains steadfast and resolute in fulfilling their obligations or duties, regardless of any challenges or obstacles they may face.

  • For instance, “Despite the difficulties, she remains unwavering in her dedication to her job.”
  • In a conversation about commitment, someone might say, “An unwavering employee is a valuable asset to any organization.”
  • A person discussing perseverance might say, “To succeed, you need to have an unwavering determination to overcome obstacles.”

78. Uncompromising

This term describes someone who refuses to make concessions or compromises when it comes to fulfilling their obligations or responsibilities.

  • For example, “He is known for his uncompromising dedication to his work.”
  • In a discussion about integrity, someone might say, “An uncompromising individual always follows through on their promises.”
  • A person describing a strict boss might say, “She has an uncompromising approach to meeting deadlines.”

79. In the line of duty

This phrase refers to actions or responsibilities that are required as part of one’s professional obligations or duties.

  • For instance, “Police officers put their lives on the line in the line of duty.”
  • In a conversation about sacrifices, someone might say, “Soldiers often face danger in the line of duty.”
  • A person describing a firefighter might say, “Rescuing people from burning buildings is all in a day’s work in the line of duty.”

80. Pressed

This term describes a state of being under extreme pressure or stress to fulfill obligations or meet deadlines.

  • For example, “I’m feeling really pressed to finish this project on time.”
  • In a discussion about time management, someone might say, “When you’re pressed for time, prioritization becomes crucial.”
  • A person describing a busy schedule might say, “I’m constantly pressed with work and responsibilities.”