Top 51 Slang For Obligation – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing obligation in a casual and trendy way, the world of slang has got you covered. Whether you’re feeling obligated to binge-watch a new series or attend a social event, our team has gathered the most popular and up-to-date slang terms that will have you navigating obligations with ease and style. Say goodbye to boring obligations and hello to a whole new level of coolness with our list of top slang for obligation.

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1. Must-do

Refers to a task or action that is required or essential to be done. It implies a sense of obligation or necessity.

  • For example, “Completing this report is a must-do before the deadline.”
  • A person might say, “I have a must-do today, I need to go grocery shopping.”
  • In a conversation about travel plans, someone might mention, “Visiting the Eiffel Tower is a must-do when in Paris.”

2. Have to

Indicates a necessity or obligation to perform a certain action or task. It implies that there is no choice or alternative.

  • For instance, “I have to finish this project by tomorrow.”
  • A student might say, “I have to study for my exams.”
  • In a discussion about work responsibilities, someone might mention, “I have to attend a meeting in the afternoon.”

3. Need to

Expresses a requirement or necessity to complete a particular action or task. It implies that the action is important or essential.

  • For example, “I need to go to the bank to deposit some money.”
  • A person might say, “I need to call my mom to wish her happy birthday.”
  • In a conversation about household chores, someone might mention, “I need to do the laundry today.”

4. Got to

Means that there is a strong obligation or necessity to perform a certain action or task. It emphasizes the urgency or importance of the action.

  • For instance, “I’ve got to finish this report before the end of the day.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve got to pick up my kids from school.”
  • In a discussion about personal goals, someone might mention, “I’ve got to start exercising regularly.”

5. Obliged to

Refers to a moral or social duty to perform a certain action or task. It suggests a sense of responsibility or commitment.

  • For example, “I feel obliged to help my friend in need.”
  • A person might say, “I am obliged to attend this family gathering.”
  • In a conversation about volunteer work, someone might mention, “I feel obliged to give back to the community.”

6. Duty-bound

When someone is duty-bound, they feel a strong sense of obligation or responsibility to fulfill a certain task or duty. This term often implies a moral or ethical obligation.

  • For example, a soldier might say, “I am duty-bound to protect my country.”
  • In a discussion about professional ethics, someone might argue, “Lawyers are duty-bound to act in the best interest of their clients.”
  • A person might express their sense of duty by saying, “I feel duty-bound to help those in need.”

7. Compelled to

When someone is compelled to do something, they feel a strong urge or obligation to take a certain action. This term suggests a sense of being driven or motivated to act.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I am compelled to study for this important exam.”
  • In a conversation about personal values, someone might assert, “I am compelled to speak up against injustice.”
  • A person might express their sense of obligation by stating, “I feel compelled to help others in any way I can.”

8. Bound to

When someone is bound to do something, they are under a moral or legal obligation to fulfill a certain task or duty. This term emphasizes a sense of being tied or obligated to a particular action.

  • For example, a person might say, “I am bound to keep the promises I make.”
  • In a discussion about family obligations, someone might say, “I am bound to take care of my aging parents.”
  • A person might express their sense of obligation by stating, “I feel bound to follow through on my commitments.”

9. Required to

When someone is required to do something, it means that it is necessary or obligatory for them to fulfill a certain task or duty. This term suggests that there are specific expectations or rules that need to be followed.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I am required to complete my homework before the deadline.”
  • In a conversation about workplace policies, someone might assert, “Employees are required to attend mandatory training sessions.”
  • A person might express their sense of obligation by stating, “I feel required to meet the expectations set by my role.”

10. Have a responsibility to

When someone has a responsibility to do something, they feel obligated by a sense of duty or accountability to fulfill a certain task or duty. This term emphasizes the importance of fulfilling one’s obligations.

  • For example, a parent might say, “I have a responsibility to provide for my children.”
  • In a discussion about environmental conservation, someone might argue, “We have a responsibility to protect our planet for future generations.”
  • A person might express their sense of obligation by stating, “I feel a responsibility to contribute to my community.”

11. Under an obligation to

This phrase implies that someone is legally or morally required to do something. It suggests a sense of duty or responsibility.

  • For example, “I am under an obligation to pay my taxes by April 15th.”
  • In a contract, it might state, “The party shall be under an obligation to provide the necessary documentation.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “You are under an obligation to clean your room before going out.”

12. Should

This word indicates that something is advisable or recommended, although it doesn’t necessarily imply a strict obligation.

  • For instance, “You should apologize for your mistake.”
  • In a conversation about healthy habits, someone might say, “We should exercise regularly.”
  • A teacher might advise a student, “You should study for the test.”

13. Ought to

Similar to “should,” this word expresses a sense of expectation or recommendation, but with a slightly stronger tone.

  • For example, “You ought to be more careful with your money.”
  • In a discussion about environmental responsibility, someone might say, “We ought to reduce our carbon footprint.”
  • A friend might suggest, “You ought to try that new restaurant in town.”

14. Needful

This word suggests that something is essential or required.

  • For instance, “I will do the needful to resolve the issue.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might say, “Please complete the needful tasks by the end of the day.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “It is needful to finish your homework before watching TV.”

15. Compulsory

This term indicates that something is mandatory or obligatory, often due to a specific law or rule.

  • For example, “Wearing a seatbelt is compulsory while driving.”
  • In a school setting, a teacher might say, “Attendance at the assembly is compulsory for all students.”
  • A company policy might state, “Completion of the safety training is compulsory for all employees.”

16. Mandatory

This term refers to something that is necessary or obligatory. It indicates that there is a rule or regulation in place that must be followed.

  • For example, “Wearing a seatbelt is mandatory while driving.”
  • In a workplace, a sign might say, “Safety training is mandatory for all employees.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Attendance is mandatory for this field trip.”

17. Imperative

This word is used to describe something that is absolutely necessary or crucial. It emphasizes the importance and urgency of the obligation.

  • For instance, “It is imperative that we address climate change for the future of our planet.”
  • A boss might say, “Meeting the deadline is imperative for the success of this project.”
  • In a medical emergency, a doctor might exclaim, “It’s imperative that we get the patient to the hospital immediately!”

18. Indispensable

This term describes something that is absolutely necessary and cannot be done without. It emphasizes the importance and essential nature of the obligation.

  • For example, “Teamwork is indispensable for the success of any organization.”
  • A parent might say, “Sleep is indispensable for a child’s growth and development.”
  • A coach might emphasize to their players, “Practice is indispensable for improving your skills.”

19. Vital

This word indicates that something is absolutely necessary for the success or well-being of a person or situation. It emphasizes the importance and significance of the obligation.

  • For instance, “Exercise is vital for maintaining good health.”
  • A manager might say, “Clear communication is vital for a productive work environment.”
  • In a survival situation, someone might say, “Finding clean water is vital for our survival.”

20. Crucial

This term describes something that is extremely important and necessary for the success or outcome of a situation. It emphasizes the significance and critical nature of the obligation.

  • For example, “Attention to detail is crucial for the success of this project.”
  • A teacher might say, “Understanding the basics is crucial for building advanced knowledge.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “Teamwork is crucial for winning the game.”

21. Compelled

When someone is compelled to do something, they are forced or strongly influenced to do it. This term implies a sense of urgency or necessity.

  • For example, “I felt compelled to speak up against the injustice.”
  • In a conversation about personal choices, someone might say, “I’m not compelled to conform to societal norms.”
  • A person discussing their career path might say, “I felt compelled to follow my passion and pursue a creative field.”

22. Obliged

When someone is obliged to do something, they feel morally or legally bound to do it. This term often implies a sense of duty or gratitude.

  • For instance, “I am obliged to help my family in times of need.”
  • In a situation where someone offers assistance, they might say, “I’m always obliged to lend a helping hand.”
  • A person expressing appreciation might say, “I’m deeply obliged for your support.”

23. Bound

When someone is bound to do something, they are constrained or obligated to do it. This term suggests a sense of restriction or limitation.

  • For example, “I am bound by the terms of my contract to fulfill my obligations.”
  • In a discussion about personal choices, someone might say, “I feel bound to follow the traditions of my culture.”
  • A person explaining their responsibilities might say, “As a parent, I am bound to prioritize my child’s well-being.”

24. Required

When something is required, it is mandatory or necessary. This term indicates that something must be done or fulfilled.

  • For instance, “Attendance is required for all participants.”
  • In a conversation about qualifications, someone might say, “A bachelor’s degree is often required for this job.”
  • A person discussing rules and regulations might say, “Wearing a seatbelt is required by law.”

25. Obligated

When someone is obligated to do something, they have a moral or legal duty to do it. This term emphasizes a sense of responsibility or commitment.

  • For example, “I am obligated to keep my promises.”
  • In a situation where someone asks for assistance, they might say, “I feel obligated to help out.”
  • A person discussing ethical behavior might say, “We are all obligated to treat others with kindness and respect.”

26. Expected

This term refers to something that is anticipated or required to be done. It implies a sense of obligation or responsibility.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “It is expected that you complete your homework by tomorrow.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might state, “It is expected that all employees arrive on time.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “It is expected that you clean your room before dinner.”

27. Pressured

This word describes the state of being influenced or compelled to do something, often due to external factors or expectations.

  • For example, a student might say, “I feel pressured to get good grades because my parents have high expectations.”
  • In a social context, someone might feel pressured to attend an event they’re not interested in, saying, “I feel pressured to go because all my friends are attending.”
  • A person might feel pressured to conform to societal norms, stating, “I feel pressured to dress a certain way to fit in.”

28. Behooved

This term suggests that it is one’s duty or obligation to do something, as it is considered the right or proper course of action.

  • For instance, a manager might say, “It behooves us to address this issue promptly to avoid further complications.”
  • In a personal context, someone might say, “It behooves me to apologize for my mistake and make amends.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “It behooves you to study for the upcoming exam in order to succeed.”

29. Enjoined

This word signifies being officially directed or instructed to carry out a particular action or behavior, often by an authority figure or a set of rules.

  • For example, a judge might enjoin a defendant to cease a specific activity as part of a court order.
  • In a workplace, a manager might enjoin their employees to follow safety protocols for their own well-being.
  • A teacher might enjoin their students to complete a project by a specific deadline.
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30. Incumbent

This term describes something that is necessary or obligatory due to one’s current position or role. It implies that certain actions or behaviors are expected or required.

  • For instance, a politician might say, “As the incumbent, it is my duty to serve the needs of my constituents.”
  • In a professional context, someone might state, “As the team leader, it is incumbent upon me to ensure the project’s success.”
  • A teacher might explain to their students, “It is incumbent upon you to actively participate in class discussions to enhance your learning experience.”

31. Requisite

This term refers to something that is required or essential for a particular purpose or situation. It emphasizes the importance or necessity of something.

  • For example, “A valid ID is requisite for entering the club.”
  • In a job description, it might state, “A bachelor’s degree is requisite for this position.”
  • A person might say, “Good communication skills are requisite for success in any field.”

32. Reckoned

To reckon something means to consider it or regard it as true or accurate. It implies a sense of obligation or responsibility towards a particular belief or viewpoint.

  • For instance, “He is reckoned as one of the best chefs in the city.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “It is widely reckoned that climate change is a pressing issue.”
  • A person might state, “I reckon it’s important to prioritize mental health.”

33. Constrained

When someone feels constrained, they feel limited or restricted in their actions or choices. It implies a sense of obligation or pressure to conform to certain limitations.

  • For example, “She felt constrained by societal expectations.”
  • In a discussion about personal freedom, someone might say, “Our choices are often constrained by external factors.”
  • A person might express, “I feel constrained to follow the rules even when I disagree with them.”

34. Urged

To urge someone is to strongly encourage or persuade them to take a particular action. It implies a sense of obligation or responsibility to act upon the advice or suggestion.

  • For instance, “The doctor urged him to quit smoking for the sake of his health.”
  • In a motivational speech, someone might say, “I urge you to chase your dreams and never give up.”
  • A friend might urge another, “I urge you to apologize and make amends.”

35. Convinced

When someone is convinced, they are fully persuaded or certain about something. It implies a sense of obligation or belief in the truth or validity of a particular idea or argument.

  • For example, “After hearing the evidence, the jury was convinced of the defendant’s guilt.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I am convinced that climate change is a result of human activity.”
  • A person might state, “I am convinced that education is the key to a better future.”

36. Coerced

To be coerced means to be forced or compelled to do something against one’s will. It implies that there is some form of pressure or manipulation involved.

  • For example, “He was coerced into signing the contract under duress.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial decision, someone might say, “The government is coercing people into getting vaccinated.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I felt coerced into attending the party even though I didn’t want to go.”

37. Directed

To be directed means to be given specific instructions or guidance on what to do. It implies that there is someone in authority or a higher position providing the direction.

  • For instance, “The boss directed us to finish the project by the end of the week.”
  • In a conversation about a team project, someone might say, “The team leader directed each member on their roles and responsibilities.”
  • A person sharing a work experience might say, “I was directed to attend a training session to improve my skills.”

38. Dictated

To be dictated means to be given a command or order that must be followed without question. It implies that there is a clear authority figure or set of rules.

  • For example, “The general dictated the battle plan to the troops.”
  • In a discussion about strict parenting, someone might say, “My parents dictated every aspect of my life growing up.”
  • A person sharing a workplace situation might say, “The strict dress code dictated that we had to wear formal attire.”

39. Mandated

To be mandated means to be officially required or obligated to do something. It implies that there is a legal or authoritative requirement.

  • For instance, “The new law mandates that all citizens must wear seat belts.”
  • In a conversation about education, someone might say, “The curriculum mandates that students take a certain number of math courses.”
  • A person sharing a government policy might say, “The mandate requires businesses to implement environmentally-friendly practices.”

40. Regulated

To be regulated means to be controlled or governed by rules, laws, or regulations. It implies that there are specific guidelines or restrictions in place.

  • For example, “The industry is heavily regulated to ensure consumer safety.”
  • In a discussion about financial markets, someone might say, “The government regulates trading to prevent fraud and manipulation.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I appreciate that my workplace is regulated to protect employee rights.”

41. Stipulated

Stipulated means something that is specified or mandated as a requirement. It is often used in legal or formal contexts.

  • For example, “The contract stipulated that the project must be completed within three months.”
  • In a discussion about rules, someone might say, “The dress code stipulates that employees must wear formal attire.”
  • A student might complain, “The professor stipulated that the paper must be at least 10 pages long.”

42. Enforced

Enforced refers to something that is made mandatory or obligatory by using authority or power. It implies that there are consequences for not following the obligation.

  • For instance, “The law is enforced to ensure public safety.”
  • A parent might say, “Bedtime is strictly enforced in our house.”
  • In a workplace, a manager might enforce a dress code policy by saying, “Employees are required to dress professionally at all times.”

43. Bounden

Bounden is an old-fashioned term that means being morally or legally obliged to do something. It implies a strong sense of duty or responsibility.

  • For example, “As a doctor, I am bounden to uphold patient confidentiality.”
  • In a conversation about loyalty, someone might say, “I feel bounden to my family and will always support them.”
  • A soldier might express, “I am bounden to protect my country and its citizens.”

44. Pressed

Pressed means being strongly encouraged or urged to do something. It implies a sense of obligation or pressure to fulfill a task or responsibility.

  • For instance, “I am pressed to finish this report by the end of the day.”
  • A friend might say, “I know you’re busy, but I’m really pressed for time. Can you help me with this?”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might press an employee to meet a deadline by saying, “We are pressed for time on this project, so please work efficiently.”

45. Have got to

“Have got to” is a colloquial phrase that means having an obligation or necessity to do something. It is often used in informal conversations.

  • For example, “I have got to finish this assignment before tomorrow.”
  • A person might say, “I have got to call my mom and wish her a happy birthday.”
  • In a discussion about responsibilities, someone might mention, “I have got to pay my bills on time to avoid late fees.”

46. Essential

Something that is absolutely necessary or crucial.

  • For example, “Water is essential for survival.”
  • In a discussion about skincare, someone might say, “Moisturizer is an essential part of any skincare routine.”
  • A traveler might say, “A good pair of walking shoes is essential for exploring a new city.”

47. Pressing

Something that requires immediate attention or action.

  • For instance, “I have a pressing deadline for this project.”
  • In a conversation about priorities, someone might say, “Let’s focus on the most pressing issues first.”
  • A student might say, “I have a pressing need to study for my upcoming exams.”

48. Inescapable

Something that cannot be avoided or ignored.

  • For example, “Death is an inescapable part of life.”
  • In a discussion about consequences, someone might say, “The inescapable truth is that actions have consequences.”
  • A person dealing with a difficult situation might say, “I’m facing an inescapable reality and need to find a solution.”

49. Prerequisite

Something that must be done or achieved before something else can happen.

  • For instance, “Taking a prerequisite course is necessary before enrolling in the advanced class.”
  • In a conversation about job qualifications, someone might say, “Meeting the educational requirements is a prerequisite for this position.”
  • A student might say, “Completing the prerequisite courses is the first step towards my degree.”

50. Prescribed

Something that is officially ordered or recommended.

  • For example, “The doctor prescribed medication for my illness.”
  • In a discussion about rules, someone might say, “Following the prescribed guidelines is important.”
  • A person discussing legal requirements might say, “Complying with the prescribed regulations is necessary to avoid penalties.”

51. Governed

This term refers to being under the authority or control of rules, laws, or regulations. It implies that someone or something is obligated to follow certain guidelines or restrictions.

  • For example, in a discussion about government policies, one might say, “The governed have a right to voice their opinions and hold their leaders accountable.”
  • In a conversation about personal choices, someone might comment, “I prefer to live my life without feeling governed by societal expectations.”
  • A person discussing a strict workplace environment might complain, “I feel so governed in this job, I can’t even take a break without permission.”