Top 68 Slang For Obvious – Meaning & Usage

Sometimes, stating the obvious can be a bit boring. But what if we told you there are slang words that add a fun twist to expressing the obvious? In this listicle, we’ve gathered the most popular slang terms that will make you stand out from the crowd and have a good laugh while doing so. Get ready to level up your vocabulary and make a statement with these hilariously obvious slang words.

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1. Clear as day

This phrase is used to describe something that is easily understood or seen without any doubt.

  • For example, “The answer to the math problem was clear as day.”
  • In a discussion about a suspicious event, someone might say, “The motive behind the crime was clear as day.”
  • A person might comment, “Her disappointment was clear as day from the look on her face.”

2. No-brainer

This term is used to describe a decision or choice that is extremely easy or obvious.

  • For instance, “Choosing the chocolate cake over the carrot cake was a no-brainer.”
  • In a conversation about job offers, someone might say, “The higher salary and better benefits make this offer a no-brainer.”
  • A person might comment, “Going to the beach on a sunny day is a no-brainer.”

3. Plain as the nose on your face

This expression emphasizes that something is very clear and apparent, just like the nose on your face.

  • For example, “It’s plain as the nose on your face that he’s lying.”
  • In a discussion about a mistake, someone might say, “The error in the report is plain as the nose on your face.”
  • A person might comment, “The solution to the problem is plain as the nose on your face once you think about it.”

4. Crystal clear

This phrase is used to describe something that is very easy to understand or see.

  • For instance, “Her instructions were crystal clear, so I had no trouble following them.”
  • In a conversation about a plan, someone might say, “The goals and steps are crystal clear.”
  • A person might comment, “The evidence against him is crystal clear.”

5. Black and white

This term is used to describe a situation or decision that has no gray areas and is easily understood.

  • For example, “The rules of the game are black and white, so there’s no room for interpretation.”
  • In a discussion about a legal case, someone might say, “The evidence presented makes it black and white.”
  • A person might comment, “The difference between right and wrong should be black and white.”

6. Cut and dried

Used to describe something that is easily understood or decided without any ambiguity or uncertainty.

  • For example, “The evidence against the suspect was cut and dried, so the jury quickly reached a guilty verdict.”
  • In a discussion about a straightforward solution, someone might say, “The answer is cut and dried – we just need to follow the instructions.”
  • A teacher might explain, “The rules for this assignment are cut and dried, so make sure you follow them carefully.”

7. Open and shut

Refers to a situation or case that is easily resolved or determined because the facts and evidence are so clear and conclusive.

  • For instance, “The detective said it was an open and shut case because the suspect was caught on camera committing the crime.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “The evidence presented makes this an open and shut case – there’s no room for doubt.”
  • A lawyer might advise their client, “If we can prove the alibi, it will make this an open and shut case.”

8. Self-evident

Describes something that is immediately apparent and does not require any further explanation or evidence to be understood.

  • For example, “It is self-evident that the sun rises in the east and sets in the west.”
  • In a logical argument, someone might state, “The conclusion is self-evident based on the premises.”
  • A scientist might explain, “The data clearly shows that the hypothesis is self-evident.”

9. Patently obvious

Used to emphasize that something is so clearly and obviously true or evident that it is impossible to deny or dispute.

  • For instance, “It is patently obvious that the company’s profits have been declining for years.”
  • In a discussion about a deceptive action, someone might say, “The intention behind that move is patently obvious.”
  • A teacher might comment on a student’s mistake, “The correct answer was patently obvious – you should have paid more attention.”

10. Blindingly obvious

Describes something that is so incredibly obvious and evident that it cannot be missed or overlooked.

  • For example, “It’s blindingly obvious that she has a crush on him – she can’t stop blushing whenever he’s around.”
  • In a puzzle-solving scenario, someone might exclaim, “The solution is blindingly obvious – how did we miss it before?”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The player’s talent is blindingly obvious – they dominate the game with ease.”

11. Duh

This phrase is used to express that something is very obvious or self-evident. It is often used in a sarcastic or mocking manner.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you think it will rain today?” and it is already pouring outside, you might respond with, “Duh, look out the window.”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity’s secret wedding, someone might say, “They’ve been wearing matching rings for months. Duh, they’re married.”
  • If someone states, “I need to eat to survive,” you might reply with, “Duh, everyone knows that.”

12. Captain Obvious

This term is used to describe someone who states the obvious or points out something that is already well-known.

  • For instance, if someone says, “The sky is blue,” and it is a clear day, you might jokingly respond with, “Thanks, Captain Obvious.”
  • In a discussion about a simple solution to a problem, someone might say, “Wow, you’re really channeling your inner Captain Obvious.”
  • If someone states, “We need air to breathe,” you might playfully reply with, “Captain Obvious to the rescue!”

13. It goes without saying

This phrase is used to indicate that something is so obvious that it does not need to be stated explicitly.

  • For example, if someone says, “We should be polite to our guests,” you might respond with, “Well, it goes without saying.”
  • In a conversation about the importance of studying for a test, someone might say, “It goes without saying that preparation is key.”
  • If someone states, “We should follow the rules,” you might agree by saying, “Of course, it goes without saying.”

14. Stating the obvious

This phrase is used to describe the act of stating something that is already well-known or evident.

  • For instance, if someone says, “The sun rises in the east,” and it is morning, you might comment, “Thanks for stating the obvious.”
  • In a discussion about a clearly visible landmark, someone might say, “You’re just stating the obvious, we can all see it.”
  • If someone states, “We need water to survive,” you might respond with, “You’re really good at stating the obvious.”

15. Like shooting fish in a barrel

This phrase is used to describe a task or situation that is exceptionally easy or requires little effort.

  • For example, if someone says, “Solving that math problem was like shooting fish in a barrel,” it means the problem was very simple.
  • In a conversation about a game with an unfair advantage, someone might say, “It’s like shooting fish in a barrel, there’s no challenge.”
  • If someone states, “Finding a parking spot at this hour is easy,” you might reply with, “Yeah, it’s like shooting fish in a barrel.”

16. It’s written all over your face

This phrase means that something is easily noticeable or apparent based on someone’s facial expressions.

  • For example, if someone is smiling and blushing, it’s written all over their face that they are in love.
  • If someone is frowning and has tears in their eyes, it’s written all over their face that they are upset.
  • When someone is trying to hide their surprise but their eyes widen and their mouth drops open, it’s written all over their face that they are shocked.

17. It’s plain to see

This phrase means that something is easily seen or understood without any doubt or confusion.

  • For instance, if someone is wearing a wedding ring, it’s plain to see that they are married.
  • If a student consistently gets A+ grades, it’s plain to see that they are very intelligent.
  • When a company’s stocks keep rising, it’s plain to see that they are doing well financially.
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18. It’s staring you in the face

This phrase means that something is so obvious that it is impossible to overlook or ignore.

  • For example, if someone is holding a sign that says “Free Food,” it’s staring you in the face that there is free food available.
  • If someone keeps making the same mistake over and over again, it’s staring them in the face that they need to change their approach.
  • When someone is constantly late for work and their boss keeps reprimanding them, it’s staring them in the face that they need to improve their punctuality.

19. It’s as clear as crystal

This phrase means that something is very clear and easy to understand without any confusion or ambiguity.

  • For instance, if someone says “I love you” and shows affection, it’s as clear as crystal that they have romantic feelings.
  • If a person consistently delivers high-quality work and meets all deadlines, it’s as clear as crystal that they are a reliable employee.
  • When someone solves a complex math problem correctly using the right formula, it’s as clear as crystal that they have a good understanding of the concept.

20. It’s as plain as day

This phrase means that something is extremely clear and obvious, just like daylight.

  • For example, if someone is wearing a bright red shirt in a sea of people wearing black, it’s as plain as day that they stand out.
  • If a person is constantly talking about their dream of becoming a professional athlete and spends hours practicing, it’s as plain as day that they are passionate about sports.
  • When someone consistently makes sarcastic remarks and rolls their eyes, it’s as plain as day that they have a sarcastic sense of humor.

21. Blatant

This word is used to describe something that is glaringly obvious or done openly without any attempt to conceal or disguise it.

  • For example, “The politician’s blatant disregard for the truth was evident in his speech.”
  • In a discussion about cheating in sports, someone might say, “The athlete’s use of performance-enhancing drugs was blatant.”
  • A person might comment on a coworker’s behavior, saying, “Her blatant attempt to take credit for my work was unacceptable.”

22. Evident

This word is used to describe something that is easily seen or understood, without the need for further proof or explanation.

  • For instance, “The damage to the car was evident after the accident.”
  • In a debate about climate change, someone might argue, “The evidence of global warming is evident in the rising temperatures and melting ice caps.”
  • A person might comment on a friend’s mood, saying, “Her frustration was evident from the way she slammed the door.”

23. Transparent

This word is used to describe something that is easily understood or seen through, without any hidden or obscured elements.

  • For example, “The company’s intentions were transparent; they were only interested in maximizing profits.”
  • In a discussion about government accountability, someone might say, “We need more transparent policies to ensure trust and prevent corruption.”
  • A person might comment on a movie’s plot, saying, “The twist ending was not very transparent; it caught me by surprise.”

24. Apparent

This word is used to describe something that is easily seen, understood, or recognized. It often implies that the information or situation is evident or apparent to anyone who pays attention.

  • For instance, “The apparent cause of the fire was faulty wiring.”
  • In a conversation about a friend’s feelings, someone might say, “Her apparent happiness was evident from her constant smiling.”
  • A person might comment on a team’s strategy, saying, “Their apparent lack of coordination was evident in their poor performance.”

25. Glaring

This word is used to describe something that is extremely obvious or striking, often in a negative or unfavorable way.

  • For example, “The glaring spelling mistakes in the document were hard to ignore.”
  • In a discussion about a fashion faux pas, someone might say, “Her mismatched outfit was a glaring mistake.”
  • A person might comment on a flaw in a plan, saying, “The glaring omission of important details made the proposal unrealistic.”

26. Overt

Refers to something that is blatantly obvious or easily observed. It is used to describe actions or behaviors that are not hidden or subtle.

  • For example, “His overt display of affection made it clear that he had strong feelings for her.”
  • In a discussion about politics, one might say, “The candidate’s overt support for the policy is evident in their speeches.”
  • A person observing a situation might comment, “The overt tension between the two coworkers was hard to ignore.”

27. Undeniable

Describes something that is so obvious or evident that it cannot be questioned or argued against. It is often used to emphasize the certainty or truthfulness of a statement or fact.

  • For instance, “The evidence against the suspect was undeniable, leading to a conviction.”
  • In a debate, one might assert, “The benefits of exercise on overall health are undeniable.”
  • A person might state, “The impact of climate change on the environment is undeniable.”

28. Obtrusive

Refers to something that is overly conspicuous or intrusive, often in a way that is annoying or disruptive. It is used to describe objects or behaviors that stand out and draw attention in an unwanted or unwelcome manner.

  • For example, “The obtrusive billboard blocked the view of the beautiful landscape.”
  • In a discussion about interior design, one might say, “The large, obtrusive furniture overwhelmed the small space.”
  • A person might complain, “The obtrusive noise from the construction site kept me awake all night.”

29. Conspicuous

Describes something that is easily seen or noticed because it is different or unusual. It is often used to describe objects or behaviors that attract attention or stand out in a noticeable way.

  • For instance, “The celebrity’s conspicuous outfit made them the center of attention.”
  • In a conversation about wildlife, one might mention, “The bright feathers of the peacock are highly conspicuous.”
  • A person might observe, “The empty parking lot was a conspicuous sign that the store was closed.”

30. Manifest

Refers to something that is clearly or plainly seen, perceived, or understood. It is used to describe things that are easily recognized or evident without the need for further explanation.

  • For example, “Her talent for singing was manifest from a young age.”
  • In a discussion about symptoms, one might say, “The manifest signs of the illness include fever and fatigue.”
  • A person might assert, “The manifest truth of the situation cannot be denied.”

31. Patent

This term is used to describe something that is clearly evident or obvious. It implies that there is no doubt or ambiguity about the matter at hand.

  • For example, “The answer to the question is patent to anyone who has studied the subject.”
  • In a discussion about a glaring mistake, one might say, “The error in the report is patent.”
  • A person might exclaim, “It’s patent that she has feelings for him!”

32. Palpable

When something is palpable, it means that it is so obvious or apparent that it can be felt or touched. It suggests that the presence or impact of the thing in question is easily perceivable.

  • For instance, “The tension in the room was palpable.”
  • In a description of a thrilling moment, one might say, “The excitement in the air was palpable.”
  • A person might comment, “The disappointment in his voice was palpable.”

33. Visible

This term simply means that something can be seen or observed. It implies that the thing in question is not hidden or obscured.

  • For example, “The evidence was clearly visible in the photograph.”
  • In a discussion about a change in behavior, one might say, “The signs of stress are visible in his actions.”
  • A person might note, “The impact of the decision is visible in the company’s financials.”

34. Noticeable

When something is noticeable, it means that it stands out or catches one’s attention. It suggests that the thing in question is easily observed or recognized.

  • For instance, “The new painting on the wall is noticeable.”
  • In a conversation about a change in appearance, one might say, “The haircut is very noticeable.”
  • A person might comment, “The smell of baking cookies is noticeable as soon as you enter the house.”

35. Prominent

This term describes something that is easily noticeable or stands out from its surroundings. It implies that the thing in question is noteworthy or deserving of attention.

  • For example, “The mountain range is a prominent feature of the landscape.”
  • In a discussion about a key figure, one might say, “She is a prominent leader in the field.”
  • A person might note, “The company’s logo is prominently displayed on their website.”

36. Salient

This word is used to describe something that stands out or is easily noticeable. It refers to something that is striking or significant.

  • For example, “The most salient feature of the painting is its vibrant colors.”
  • In a discussion about a book, one might say, “The salient theme of the novel is the struggle for power.”
  • A person pointing out the obvious might say, “The answer is salient in the data provided.”

37. Unmistakable

This term is used to describe something that is impossible to mistake or misinterpret. It emphasizes the fact that there is no doubt about its meaning or significance.

  • For instance, “The unmistakable smell of freshly baked bread filled the air.”
  • When describing a unique landmark, one might say, “The unmistakable silhouette of the Eiffel Tower can be seen from miles away.”
  • A person stating the obvious might say, “The answer is unmistakable if you read the instructions carefully.”

38. Unambiguous

This word is used to describe something that is clear and straightforward, leaving no room for confusion or ambiguity. It emphasizes the fact that there is only one possible interpretation.

  • For example, “The instructions for assembling the furniture were unambiguous and easy to follow.”
  • When describing a decision, one might say, “The judge’s ruling was unambiguous and left no room for appeal.”
  • A person stating the obvious might say, “The answer is unambiguous if you look at the evidence.”

39. Plain as a pikestaff

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is extremely clear and obvious. It compares the clarity of the situation to the visual clarity of a pikestaff, which is a long wooden pole.

  • For instance, “The fact that she was lying was plain as a pikestaff.”
  • When pointing out an obvious solution, one might say, “The answer is plain as a pikestaff if you think about it.”
  • A person stating the obvious might say, “The answer is plain as a pikestaff if you use common sense.”

40. Staring you in the face

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is so obvious that it cannot be ignored or overlooked. It suggests that the answer or solution is right in front of you, demanding attention.

  • For example, “The solution to the problem was staring us in the face the whole time.”
  • When pointing out the obvious, one might say, “The answer is staring you in the face if you just open your eyes.”
  • A person stating the obvious might say, “The answer is staring you in the face if you pay attention to the details.”

41. Standing out like a sore thumb

This phrase is used to describe something or someone that is extremely obvious and easily stands out among other things or people.

  • For example, “With her bright red hair, she was standing out like a sore thumb in the crowd.”
  • In a group of people wearing casual clothes, someone wearing a formal suit might be said to be “standing out like a sore thumb.”
  • If a house is painted in neon colors in a neighborhood of plain houses, it would “stand out like a sore thumb.”

42. Cannot be missed

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is so obvious or noticeable that it is impossible to overlook or ignore.

  • For instance, “With its towering height, the skyscraper cannot be missed in the city skyline.”
  • A bright neon sign flashing in the dark would be something that “cannot be missed.”
  • If there is a large billboard on the side of the road, it would be described as something that “cannot be missed.”

43. Cannot be overlooked

This phrase is used to convey that something is so obvious or significant that it cannot be disregarded or ignored.

  • For example, “The evidence against the suspect was so strong that it could not be overlooked by the jury.”
  • If there is a major flaw in a plan, it cannot be overlooked and needs to be addressed.
  • In a discussion about climate change, the impact of human activity on the environment cannot be overlooked.
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44. Cannot be ignored

This phrase is used to express that something is so obvious or important that it cannot be neglected or dismissed.

  • For instance, “The loud noise coming from the next room cannot be ignored.”
  • If a person is repeatedly making offensive comments, their behavior cannot be ignored and should be addressed.
  • In a meeting, if someone raises a valid concern, it cannot be ignored and needs to be considered.

45. Cannot be mistaken

This phrase is used to indicate that something is so clear or obvious that it cannot be confused or misinterpreted.

  • For example, “With his distinct accent and unique hairstyle, his identity cannot be mistaken.”
  • If a person is wearing a police uniform, their role cannot be mistaken.
  • In a lineup of identical objects, the one with a bright color would be something that “cannot be mistaken.”

This phrase is used to describe something that is extremely obvious and cannot be concealed or hidden. It emphasizes that the truth or reality of a situation is clear and evident.

  • For example, “The evidence against him is cannot be hidden. It’s plain as day.”
  • In a discussion about a glaring mistake, someone might say, “The error in the report cannot be hidden. It’s plain as day.”
  • A person might comment, “Her true intentions cannot be hidden. It’s plain as day that she’s after something.”

47. Cannot be denied

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is so obvious and evident that it cannot be denied or ignored. It implies that the truth or reality of a situation is clear and undeniable.

  • For instance, “The fact that she lied cannot be denied. It’s crystal clear.”
  • In a debate about a controversial topic, someone might argue, “The impact of climate change cannot be denied. It’s crystal clear that human activities are contributing to it.”
  • A person might state, “The success of the project cannot be denied. It’s crystal clear that our strategies are effective.”

48. Cannot be misunderstood

This phrase is used to describe something that is so obvious and unambiguous that it cannot be misunderstood or misinterpreted. It emphasizes that the meaning or intention is crystal clear and easily understood.

  • For example, “The instructions cannot be misunderstood. They’re as clear as day.”
  • In a conversation about a straightforward message, someone might say, “The email cannot be misunderstood. It’s as clear as day that she wants us to meet at 3 pm.”
  • A person might comment, “The signs cannot be misunderstood. They’re as clear as day that this is the right way to go.”

49. Cannot be misconstrued

This phrase is used to describe something that is so obvious and straightforward that it cannot be misconstrued or misinterpreted. It implies that the meaning or nature of a situation is clear and unambiguous.

  • For instance, “The evidence cannot be misconstrued. It’s cut and dried.”
  • In a discussion about a simple decision, someone might say, “The answer cannot be misconstrued. It’s cut and dried that we should choose option A.”
  • A person might state, “The facts cannot be misconstrued. They’re cut and dried, showing his guilt.”

50. Cannot be misinterpreted

This phrase is used to describe something that is so clear and unambiguous that it cannot be misinterpreted or misunderstood. It implies that the situation or information is straightforward and lacks any shades of gray.

  • For example, “The rules cannot be misinterpreted. They’re black and white.”
  • In a conversation about a clear-cut decision, someone might say, “The answer cannot be misinterpreted. It’s black and white that we should proceed with the project.”
  • A person might comment, “The law cannot be misinterpreted. It’s black and white that stealing is a crime.”

51. Cannot be misread

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is extremely clear and easy to understand. It suggests that there is no possibility for misinterpretation or confusion.

  • For example, “The instructions were written in such a way that they cannot be misread.”
  • A person might say, “The evidence presented in court was so compelling, it cannot be misread.”
  • Another might comment, “His intentions were crystal clear and cannot be misread.”

52. Cannot be misjudged

This expression is used to describe something that is very obvious or evident. It implies that there is no room for doubt or error in judgment.

  • For instance, “The answer to the math problem cannot be misjudged; it’s plain as day.”
  • During a debate, someone might say, “The facts presented are plain as day and cannot be misjudged.”
  • A person might comment, “His talent on the basketball court is plain as day; it cannot be misjudged.”

53. Cannot be misperceived

This word is used to describe something that is impossible to misperceive or misunderstand. It suggests that the truth or reality of a situation is so clear and evident that it cannot be denied.

  • For example, “The evidence against the defendant is undeniable; it cannot be misperceived.”
  • A person might say, “The impact of climate change on the environment is undeniable and cannot be misperceived.”
  • Another might comment, “The success of the company is undeniable; it cannot be misperceived.”

54. Cannot be misapprehended

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is extremely obvious or apparent. It suggests that there is no possibility for misunderstanding or misapprehension.

  • For instance, “The answer to the riddle cannot be misapprehended; it’s obvious as the nose on your face.”
  • During a conversation, someone might say, “The truth of the matter is obvious as the nose on your face and cannot be misapprehended.”
  • A person might comment, “The solution to the problem is obvious as the nose on your face; it cannot be misapprehended.”

55. Cannot be misconceived

This term is used to describe something that is very clear and unambiguous. It suggests that there is no room for misunderstanding or misconceiving.

  • For example, “The instructions for assembling the furniture are clear-cut; they cannot be misconceived.”
  • A person might say, “The facts presented in the report are clear-cut and cannot be misconceived.”
  • Another might comment, “The message of the movie is clear-cut; it cannot be misconceived.”

56. Cannot be miscomprehended

This phrase emphasizes that something is so clear and easily understood that there is no possibility of misunderstanding or confusion.

  • For example, “The instructions were written in plain language, so they cannot be miscomprehended.”
  • In a conversation about a straightforward concept, someone might say, “The answer is right in front of you. It cannot be miscomprehended.”
  • A teacher might explain, “I explained the concept thoroughly, so it cannot be miscomprehended by the students.”

57. Cannot be misgauged

This phrase indicates that something is extremely obvious and cannot be misjudged or misinterpreted.

  • For instance, “The evidence against the accused is overwhelming. It cannot be misgauged.”
  • In a discussion about a glaring mistake, someone might say, “The error is so obvious, it cannot be misgauged.”
  • A commentator might remark, “The team’s dominance on the field is obvious as day. It cannot be misgauged.”

58. Cannot be misestimated

This expression emphasizes that something is so evident and apparent that it cannot be miscalculated or misjudged.

  • For example, “The impact of climate change on the environment is plain as the nose on your face. It cannot be misestimated.”
  • In a conversation about an obvious conclusion, someone might say, “The facts speak for themselves. The result cannot be misestimated.”
  • A scientist might state, “The data is clear and unequivocal. The correlation cannot be misestimated.”

59. Cannot be misreckoned

This phrase indicates that something is extremely clear and cannot be miscalculated or misperceived.

  • For instance, “The defendant’s guilt is as clear as day. It cannot be misreckoned.”
  • In a discussion about an unmistakable sign, someone might say, “The evidence is right in front of us. It cannot be misreckoned.”
  • A witness might testify, “I saw the crime happen with my own eyes. The sequence of events cannot be misreckoned.”

60. Cannot be miscounted

This term suggests that something is so obvious and straightforward that it requires little to no mental effort or consideration.

  • For example, “Choosing the healthier option is a no-brainer. It cannot be miscounted.”
  • In a conversation about an easy decision, someone might say, “The answer is right in front of you. It’s a no-brainer.”
  • A coach might instruct their team, “Passing the ball to the open player is a no-brainer. It cannot be miscounted.”

61. Cannot be miscomputed

This phrase emphasizes that something is so clear and evident that it cannot be calculated incorrectly.

  • For example, “The answer to that math problem cannot be miscomputed.”
  • In a discussion about data analysis, one might say, “The results are straightforward and cannot be miscomputed.”
  • A person might use this phrase to assert, “The truth of the matter cannot be miscomputed.”

62. Cannot be miscalculated

This phrase highlights that something is so obvious and clear that it cannot be calculated incorrectly.

  • For instance, “The final score of the game cannot be miscalculated.”
  • In a financial context, someone might say, “The profit margin cannot be miscalculated; it’s easily determined.”
  • A person might use this phrase to emphasize, “The importance of this decision cannot be miscalculated.”

63. Cannot be misguessed

This phrase indicates that something is so evident and apparent that it cannot be guessed incorrectly.

  • For example, “The answer to that riddle cannot be misguessed.”
  • In a game of charades, someone might say, “The word I’m acting out cannot be misguessed.”
  • A person might use this phrase to declare, “The intention behind their actions cannot be misguessed.”

64. Flagrant

This term describes something that is extremely obvious, conspicuous, or clearly visible.

  • For instance, “His disregard for the rules was flagrant.”
  • In a discussion about cheating in sports, someone might say, “That was a flagrant violation of the rules.”
  • A person might use this term to assert, “The error in their argument was flagrant.”

65. Pronounced

This word describes something that is easily seen, recognized, or understood.

  • For example, “The difference in color is pronounced.”
  • In a conversation about accents, someone might say, “Her Southern accent is pronounced.”
  • A person might use this word to emphasize, “The impact of their actions is pronounced.”

66. Elementary

This term is used to describe something that is very obvious or easy to understand.

  • For example, if someone asks a question with an obvious answer, you might respond, “It’s elementary, my dear Watson.”
  • In a discussion about a straightforward problem, someone might say, “The solution is elementary, really.”
  • If someone states the obvious, you could respond with a sarcastic comment like, “Wow, Sherlock, that’s elementary deduction right there.”

67. Written all over someone’s face

This phrase is used to describe when someone’s emotions or thoughts are clearly displayed on their face.

  • For instance, if someone is happy and it’s obvious, you might say, “It’s written all over their face.”
  • In a situation where someone is trying to hide their true feelings but failing, you could say, “The guilt is written all over their face.”
  • If someone is clearly surprised or shocked, you might exclaim, “It’s like it’s written all over their face!”

68. As clear as a bell

This expression is used to describe something that is very clear or easily understood, often with reference to sound.

  • For example, if someone’s instructions are easy to follow, you might say, “They’re as clear as a bell.”
  • In a discussion about a crystal-clear audio recording, someone might comment, “The sound quality is as clear as a bell.”
  • If someone gives a very detailed explanation that leaves no room for confusion, you could say, “They made it as clear as a bell.”