Top 48 Slang For Of – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to slang, language is constantly evolving and new words and phrases are popping up all the time. But have you ever wondered what the “of” in slang means? Well, look no further! We’ve done the research and put together a list of the top slang phrases that use “of” that you need to know. From “out of pocket” to “full of it,” we’ve got you covered. So get ready to expand your vocabulary and impress your friends with this entertaining and informative listicle.

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1. O

This is a slang term used as a short form of “Oh”. It is often used to express surprise, excitement, or understanding.

  • For example, if someone tells you an interesting fact, you might respond with “O, that’s cool!”
  • In a text message, someone might say “O, I see what you mean now.”
  • When someone tells you some shocking news, you might exclaim “O, my goodness!”

3. ’bout

This is a contraction of the word “About”. It is commonly used in informal speech and writing to indicate a general topic or subject.

  • For example, someone might say “What ’bout the party tonight?” to ask about the details of the party.
  • In a discussion about future plans, someone might ask “What ’bout next weekend?” to inquire about the availability of others.
  • When discussing a recent event, someone might say “I heard ’bout the concert last night” to share information they heard.

5. ‘n

This is a contraction of the word “And”. It is commonly used in informal speech and writing to connect words or phrases.

  • For example, someone might say “Bread ‘n butter” to indicate they want both bread and butter.
  • In a list of items, someone might say “Apples, bananas, ‘n oranges” to indicate the inclusion of all three fruits.
  • When expressing a sequence of actions, someone might say “I woke up, brushed my teeth, ‘n had breakfast.”

7. ’til

This is a contraction of the word “until” and is used to indicate the point in time before a specified event or time. It signifies the duration or time leading up to a particular moment.

  • For instance, “I’ll wait ’til you finish your work before we go.”
  • In a discussion about deadlines, someone might say, “The project is due ’til tomorrow.”
  • A person talking about a countdown might say, “Only 10 minutes ’til midnight!”

9. ‘tweenst

This is a contraction of the word “amongst” and is used to indicate the presence or inclusion of something or someone in a group or category. It signifies being surrounded by or being a part of a larger whole.

  • For instance, “He was ‘tweenst a group of talented musicians.”
  • In a discussion about preferences, someone might say, “I can’t decide ‘tweenst these two options.”
  • A person describing a gathering might say, “There was laughter and joy ‘tweenst the crowd.”

10. ‘da’

This is a shortened form of the word “the”. It is commonly used in African American Vernacular English (AAVE) and other urban dialects.

  • For example, “I’m going to da store to buy some groceries.”
  • In a conversation about a specific restaurant, someone might say, “Have you been to da new burger joint?”
  • A person might ask, “Can you pass me da salt?”

11. ‘o’

This is a shortened form of the word “of”. It is commonly used in informal speech and text messages.

  • For instance, “I’m tired o working all day.”
  • In a discussion about a book, someone might say, “The plot o the story was very interesting.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any o the ingredients for the recipe?”

12. ‘4’

This is a numerical representation of the word “for”. It is commonly used in text messages and online communication.

  • For example, “I’m going 4 a run.”
  • In a discussion about reasons, someone might say, “I did it 4 the experience.”
  • A person might ask, “What are you in the mood 4?”

13. ‘wit’

This is a shortened form of the word “with”. It is commonly used in African American Vernacular English (AAVE) and other urban dialects.

  • For instance, “I’m going out wit my friends tonight.”
  • In a discussion about a collaboration, someone might say, “I’m working wit a team of experts.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you help me wit this task?”

14. ’bout’

This is a shortened form of the word “about”. It is commonly used in African American Vernacular English (AAVE) and other urban dialects.

  • For example, “What are you talkin’ bout?”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “I’m thinkin’ bout goin’ to the movies.”
  • A person might ask, “What’s the book bout?”

15. ‘cuz’

Short for “because,” this slang term is often used to explain or justify something.

  • For example, “I couldn’t come to the party ‘cuz I had to work.”
  • A person might say, “‘Cuz I said so!” to assert their authority.
  • In a text conversation, someone might ask, “‘Cuz why not?”

16. ‘witout’

A shortened version of “without,” this slang term is used to indicate the absence or lack of something.

  • For instance, “I can’t go to the movies witout any money.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t imagine my life witout you.”
  • In a conversation, one might ask, “How can you survive witout your phone?”

17. ‘fo’

A slang term for “for,” this word is often used in casual conversations or text messages.

  • For example, “I bought this fo you.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to the store fo some groceries.”
  • In a text conversation, someone might say, “I’m waiting fo you.”

18. ‘wit’ it’

A slang phrase meaning “to understand or be knowledgeable about something.”

  • For instance, “He’s always wit it when it comes to technology.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t know what’s going on, but she’s definitely wit it.”
  • In a conversation, one might ask, “Are you wit it or do you need an explanation?”

19. ‘on’

A slang term for “onto,” this word is often used to indicate movement or a change in state.

  • For example, “I jumped on the train before it left.”
  • A person might say, “I’m putting you on to the latest fashion trends.”
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “Can you get on with the task at hand?”

20. ‘off’

A shortened form of the word “of”. It is commonly used in informal speech and writing.

  • For example, “I’m tired off all this homework.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe she made fun off me.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I’m running late, can you let the boss know off my delay?”

21. ‘in’

A shortened form of the word “of”. It is commonly used in informal speech and writing.

  • For instance, “I’m a big fan in this type in music.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not interested in any off that.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Are you coming in tonight?”

22. ‘outta’

A contraction of the phrase “out of”. It is commonly used in informal speech and writing.

  • For example, “I’m outta here, see you tomorrow.”
  • A person might say, “I ran outta time to finish the project.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I’m outta milk, can you pick some up on your way home?”

23. ’til’

A shortened form of the word “until”. It is commonly used in informal speech and writing.

  • For instance, “I can’t wait ’til the weekend.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll be working ’til late tonight.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “How long ’til you’re ready?”

24. ‘wif’

A misspelling of the word “with”, commonly used in informal speech and writing.

  • For example, “I’m going wif my friends to the party.”
  • A person might say, “Can you come wif me to the store?”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I’ll be there wif bells on!”

25. ‘frum’

This slang term is a shortened version of the word “from.” It is commonly used in casual conversations or informal writing.

  • For example, “I’m frum Texas, y’all!”
  • A person might say, “Where are you frum?” to ask about someone’s hometown.
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I just got back frum the store.”

26. ’boutta’

This slang term is a contraction of the phrase “about to.” It is used to express that something is going to happen soon or in the near future.

  • For instance, “I’m boutta leave for work.”
  • A person might say, “I’m boutta grab some food. Wanna come?”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I’m boutta take a nap.”

27. ‘on to’

This slang term is a shortened version of the word “onto.” It is used to indicate movement or progression from one thing to another.

  • For example, “I’m on to the next project.”
  • A person might say, “He’s on to bigger and better things.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Let’s move on to the next topic.”

28. ‘offa’

This slang term is a contraction of the phrase “off of.” It is used to indicate movement away from or separation from something.

  • For instance, “Get offa me!”
  • A person might say, “I fell offa my bike.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I just got offa work.”

29. ‘inna’

This slang term is a contraction of the phrase “in the.” It is commonly used in casual conversations or informal writing.

  • For example, “I’m inna mood for pizza.”
  • A person might say, “I’m inna middle of something. Can I call you back?”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I’m inna car. Be there soon.”

31. ‘f

Similar to the previous slang term, this is an abbreviation for the word “of”. It is commonly used in casual or informal contexts.

  • For instance, “I’m sick ‘f this weather.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in need ‘f a vacation.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I’m out ‘f town for the weekend.”

32. o’

This is another slang abbreviation for the word “of”. It is often used in spoken language or informal writing.

  • For example, “I’m a big fan o’ pizza.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve never heard o’ that band before.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I’m out o’ ideas for dinner.”

33. da

This slang term is an abbreviation for the word “the”. It is commonly used in urban or hip-hop culture.

  • For instance, “I saw da movie last night and it was amazing.”
  • A person might say, “Da boss is not happy with our performance.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “I’m at da store. Do you need anything?”

35. ’bouta

This is a contraction of “about to” and is used to indicate that someone is going to do something soon. It is often used in informal speech or in casual conversations.

  • For example, “I’m ’bouta go grab some food, want anything?”
  • A person might say, “I was ’bouta call you, but you beat me to it.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I’m ’bouta lose my mind if this traffic doesn’t clear up soon!”

37. ‘stead

This is a contraction of the word “instead” and is used to indicate that one thing is happening or being done in place of another.

  • For example, “I’ll have tea ‘stead of coffee today.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s go for a walk ‘stead of watching TV.”
  • Another might suggest, “We can use this tool ‘stead of the old one.”

39. ‘bove

This is a contraction of the word “above” and is used to indicate that something is in a higher position or level.

  • For example, “The moon is ‘bove the clouds.”
  • A person might say, “Please place the book ‘bove the shelf.”
  • Another might point out, “The temperature is ‘bove freezing today.”

41. ‘hind

This is a contraction of the word “behind” and is used to indicate something that is at the back or rear of something else. It is often used in a poetic or old-fashioned context.

  • For instance, “The sun set ‘hind the mountains.”
  • In a story, you might read, “He was always lurking ‘hind the scenes.”
  • A poet might describe a hidden object as “concealed ‘hind a veil of darkness.”
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43. ‘mongst

This is a contraction of the word “amongst” and is used to indicate being in the midst or company of something or someone. It is often used in a poetic or old-fashioned context.

  • For instance, “She stood ‘mongst a crowd of admirers.”
  • In a story, you might read, “He sought refuge ‘mongst the trees.”
  • A poet might describe a feeling of belonging as “finding solace ‘mongst kindred spirits.”

45. ‘gain

A shortened form of the word “again,” often used in informal or dialect speech. It indicates repetition or a return to a previous state or action.

  • For example, “Let’s do it ‘gain!”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe you’re late ‘gain.”
  • In a conversation about a repeated mistake, someone might comment, “He did it ‘gain, even after being warned.”

47. ’till

A shortened form of the word “until,” often used in informal speech. It indicates a duration of time or an event that continues up to a specified point.

  • For example, “Wait ’till I finish.”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “I’ll be here ’till 5 o’clock.”
  • A person might ask, “How long ’till the movie starts?”