Top 48 Slang For Old Man – Meaning & Usage

As time goes by, language evolves and new words and phrases emerge. This is especially true when it comes to slang. Ever wondered what the cool kids are calling the older generation these days? Well, wonder no more! We’ve done the research and put together a list of the top slang terms for old man that will keep you in the loop and have you laughing out loud. So sit back, relax, and get ready to learn some hilarious new ways to refer to the wise elders in our lives.

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1. Back Number

This term is often used to describe someone who is stuck in the past or has outdated beliefs or ideas.

  • For example, “My grandfather is such a back number. He still thinks rotary phones are the best.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t listen to him, he’s just a back number.”
  • In a conversation about fashion trends, someone might comment, “Those bell-bottom jeans are so back number.”

2. Bag of Bones

This term is used to describe an old man who is very thin or frail, often implying that he is weak or unhealthy.

  • For instance, “Look at that bag of bones trying to lift that heavy box.”
  • A person might say, “He used to be so strong, but now he’s just a bag of bones.”
  • In a discussion about health, someone might comment, “I hope I don’t end up as a bag of bones when I’m old.”

3. CCRC

A CCRC is a type of retirement community that offers a range of services and care options for older adults. It typically includes independent living, assisted living, and skilled nursing care, allowing residents to age in place.

  • For example, “My grandparents live in a CCRC and they love the sense of community.”
  • A person might say, “I’m considering moving into a CCRC when I retire.”
  • In a conversation about retirement planning, someone might ask, “Have you looked into CCRCs in your area?”

4. Flumpnugget

This slang term is used in a playful and affectionate way to describe an old man. It conveys a sense of fondness and lightheartedness.

  • For instance, “My grandpa is such a flumpnugget. He always tells the best jokes.”
  • A person might say, “I love spending time with flumpnuggets like him.”
  • In a discussion about family, someone might comment, “I have a few flumpnuggets in my family who always make gatherings fun.”

5. Geriatric

This term is derived from the field of geriatrics, which focuses on the health and care of older adults. It is often used in a clinical or formal context.

  • For example, “The geriatric ward of the hospital specializes in caring for elderly patients.”
  • A healthcare professional might say, “We need to conduct a geriatric assessment for this patient.”
  • In a conversation about aging, someone might comment, “It’s important to prioritize geriatric care and support for our aging population.”

6. Oldies

This term refers to elderly individuals, typically those who are no longer in their prime years. It can be used to describe a group of older people or an individual.

  • For example, “The oldies were reminiscing about their youth at the reunion.”
  • In a conversation about music, someone might say, “I love listening to oldies from the 60s and 70s.”
  • A person might affectionately refer to their grandparents as “the oldies.”

7. Put Years on Somebody

This phrase means to make someone appear or feel older than they actually are. It can be used to describe the impact of time, experiences, or responsibilities on a person.

  • For instance, “Having children really put years on him.”
  • In a discussion about the stress of a job, someone might say, “The long hours and constant pressure can put years on anybody.”
  • A person might comment, “That job aged him quickly. It really put years on him.”

8. Sunset Years

The “sunset years” refers to the later stage of a person’s life, typically when they are retired or approaching retirement age. It implies that the person is in the final chapter of their life, similar to the setting sun.

  • For example, “He’s enjoying his sunset years by traveling the world.”
  • In a conversation about retirement, someone might say, “I can’t wait to relax and enjoy my sunset years.”
  • A person might reflect, “My grandparents are in their sunset years, and it’s important to cherish the time we have left with them.”

9. Wiseacre

This term is used to describe someone, especially an older person, who acts or speaks in a condescending or know-it-all manner. It implies that the person thinks they are wiser or more knowledgeable than others.

  • For instance, “He’s always correcting people and acting like a wiseacre.”
  • In a discussion about a bossy coworker, someone might say, “She’s such a wiseacre, always telling everyone what to do.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t stand when old wiseacres try to lecture me about life.”

10. Geezer

This slang term is used to refer to an older man, typically in a casual or humorous way. It can be used affectionately or with a hint of sarcasm.

  • For example, “Look at that geezer walking his dog.”
  • In a conversation about an elderly neighbor, someone might say, “The geezer next door is always grumpy.”
  • A person might jokingly refer to their father as “the old geezer.”

11. Codger

The term “codger” is often used to describe an old man who is set in his ways and has old-fashioned beliefs or habits. It can also imply a sense of quirkiness or eccentricity.

  • For example, “The old codger down the street always wears a bowtie and suspenders.”
  • In a conversation about traditional values, someone might say, “I feel like such a codger for still using a flip phone.”
  • A person might jokingly refer to their father as “the codger” when telling stories about his outdated technology skills.

12. Senior citizen

“Senior citizen” is a formal term used to describe an older person who has reached a certain age, typically around retirement age. It is a respectful way to refer to older individuals and acknowledge their age and life experience.

  • For instance, “Many senior citizens enjoy participating in activities at their local community center.”
  • In a discussion about healthcare for the elderly, one might say, “We need to prioritize the well-being of our senior citizens.”
  • A person might ask, “Are there any senior citizen discounts available for this event?”

13. Old-timer

“Old-timer” is a term used to refer to an older person, particularly one who has been around for a long time or has extensive experience in a particular field. It can carry a sense of respect and admiration for their wisdom and longevity.

  • For example, “The old-timer at the hardware store knew exactly what I needed.”
  • In a conversation about local history, someone might say, “I love hearing stories from the old-timers about how the town used to be.”
  • A person might affectionately refer to their grandparent as “the family old-timer” when sharing stories about their past.
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14. Elder

The term “elder” is often used to describe an older person who is seen as wise, respected, and influential within their community. It can carry a sense of reverence and honor for their life experience and leadership.

  • For instance, “The village elder was consulted for guidance on important decisions.”
  • In a discussion about tribal traditions, one might say, “The elders hold a wealth of knowledge about our cultural heritage.”
  • A person might ask, “Are there any elders in this community who can provide guidance on this matter?”

15. Gramps

“Gramps” is an affectionate term used to refer to one’s grandfather or an older man in a friendly and endearing manner. It can imply a close and loving relationship between the speaker and the person being referred to.

  • For example, “I’m going to visit Gramps at his house this weekend.”
  • In a conversation about family traditions, someone might say, “Every year, Gramps tells us stories about his childhood.”
  • A person might say, “I’m taking Gramps out to lunch to celebrate his birthday.”

16. Pops

This term is often used to refer to one’s own father or an older man in general. It can be a term of endearment or used casually.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going to visit my pops this weekend.”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might ask, “How’s your pops doing?”
  • A person might use the term to describe an older man they have a close relationship with, saying, “My pops is always there for me.”

17. Silver fox

This term is used to describe an older man who is considered attractive, particularly due to his gray or silver hair. It is often used in a complimentary or admiring manner.

  • For instance, someone might say, “George Clooney is the ultimate silver fox.”
  • In a discussion about aging, a person might comment, “Some men only get better with age and become silver foxes.”
  • A person might use the term to compliment someone they find attractive, saying, “You’re such a silver fox!”

18. Ancient

This term is used to describe someone who is very old or elderly. It can be used playfully or to emphasize someone’s age.

  • For example, a person might say, “My grandma is ancient, but she still has a lot of energy.”
  • In a conversation about history, someone might refer to ancient civilizations or ancient artifacts.
  • A person might use the term to describe a person they see as wise due to their age, saying, “He may be ancient, but he has a lot of wisdom to share.”

19. Old coot

This term is used to describe an older man who is seen as eccentric or grumpy. It can be used affectionately or to mock someone’s behavior.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The old coot down the street always yells at kids to get off his lawn.”
  • In a discussion about memorable characters, a person might mention an old coot they encountered.
  • A person might use the term to describe a grumpy older man in a humorous way, saying, “Don’t mind him, he’s just an old coot.”

20. Fossil

This term is used to describe someone who is extremely old, often with a sense of humor or exaggeration. It highlights someone’s age and can be used playfully or affectionately.

  • For example, a person might say, “My great-grandma is a fossil, but she still manages to keep up with technology.”
  • In a conversation about longevity, someone might comment, “Living to be a hundred years old is quite a feat. That’s practically a fossil!”
  • A person might use the term to describe a beloved older relative, saying, “My grandpa may be a fossil, but he’s full of stories and wisdom.”

21. Fogey

A “fogey” is a term used to describe an older person who is seen as being overly traditional or set in their ways. It can also imply that they are out of touch with modern trends or technology.

  • For example, “My grandpa is such a fogey. He still listens to vinyl records and refuses to use a smartphone.”
  • When discussing someone’s outdated fashion choices, you might say, “He’s such a fogey with his high-waisted pants and suspenders.”
  • In a conversation about music preferences, someone might comment, “I can’t believe you still listen to that fogey music from the ’60s.”

22. Graybeard

A “graybeard” is a term used to describe an older man who has a long, often gray or white, beard. It can imply wisdom or experience, but can also be used in a derogatory manner to suggest someone is old-fashioned or lacking in energy.

  • For instance, “The wise old graybeard sat by the fire and shared stories of his adventures.”
  • When referring to a group of older men, you might say, “The graybeards of the community gathered at the local coffee shop.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s appearance, you might comment, “He’s starting to look like a real graybeard with that beard of his.”

23. Wrinkly

The term “wrinkly” is used to describe an older person who has many wrinkles on their face and/or body. It can be used in a lighthearted or affectionate manner, but can also be considered disrespectful or offensive.

  • For example, “My grandma is a beautiful wrinkly woman who has lived a full life.”
  • When discussing the effects of aging, someone might say, “I hope I don’t become too wrinkly when I get older.”
  • In a conversation about skincare, someone might comment, “I’m trying to prevent wrinkles and stay youthful for as long as possible.”

24. Old goat

An “old goat” is a term used to describe an older man who is still lively, active, and perhaps a bit mischievous. It can be used in an endearing or playful manner.

  • For instance, “My grandpa may be in his 80s, but he’s still quite the old goat. He loves playing pranks on us.”
  • When discussing someone’s energetic nature, you might say, “He’s an old goat who can still out-hike people half his age.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s adventurous spirit, you might comment, “She’s such an old goat, always seeking out new experiences and challenges.”

25. Old fart

The term “old fart” is a slang term used to describe an older person, typically a man. It is often used in a playful or affectionate manner, but can also be considered disrespectful or offensive depending on the context and tone.

  • For example, “My dad is such an old fart. He loves telling corny jokes and wearing his old-fashioned slippers.”
  • When teasing someone about their age, you might say, “Watch out, old fart, you might break a hip.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s stubbornness, you might comment, “He’s an old fart who refuses to change his ways.”

26. Old bird

This term is used to refer to an older man, usually in a light-hearted or affectionate way. It is similar to calling someone an “old bird” or “old chap”.

  • For example, “Look at that old bird over there, still dancing like he’s twenty!”
  • A group of friends might tease each other by saying, “Come on, old bird, keep up!”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might say, “My old bird is turning 80 next week.”

27. Old salt

This slang term is often used to describe a seasoned sailor, particularly someone who has spent a significant amount of time at sea. It can also be used more generally to refer to an older man with a lot of life experience.

  • For instance, “He’s an old salt who has sailed around the world twice.”
  • In a discussion about naval history, someone might mention, “Those old salts were a tough breed.”
  • A person might say, “My grandfather was an old salt and had some amazing stories to tell.”

28. Old bloke

This slang term is commonly used in British English to refer to an older man, usually in a casual or familiar manner. It is similar to calling someone a “guy” or “dude” in American English.

  • For example, “I saw an old bloke walking his dog in the park.”
  • In a conversation about a neighbor, someone might say, “The old bloke next door is always tinkering with his car.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you know that old bloke who runs the corner store?”

29. Old cod

This slang term is used to refer to an older man, often in a playful or affectionate way. It is similar to calling someone an “old coot” or “old geezer”.

  • For instance, “He’s a bit of an old cod, but he’s got a heart of gold.”
  • In a conversation about retirement, someone might say, “I hope to be a happy old cod one day.”
  • A person might affectionately say, “My dad is such an old cod, always telling the same stories.”

30. Old duffer

This slang term is often used to describe an older man, typically someone who is seen as eccentric or a bit out of touch with modern times. It is similar to calling someone an “old fogey” or “old geezer”.

  • For example, “He’s a bit of an old duffer, still using a flip phone.”
  • In a conversation about hobbies, someone might say, “I saw a group of old duffers playing golf at the park.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “I hope I don’t turn into an old duffer when I retire.”

31. Senior

The term “senior” is often used to refer to an elderly person, typically someone who is retired or close to retirement age.

  • For example, “My grandparents are seniors and enjoy spending their days gardening.”
  • In a conversation about retirement, someone might say, “Many seniors choose to travel and explore new hobbies.”
  • A person might refer to their elderly neighbor by saying, “Mr. Johnson is a friendly senior who always has a story to share.”

32. Veteran

In the context of slang for old man, “veteran” refers to a person who is experienced or seasoned, often in a particular field or profession.

  • For instance, “He’s a veteran of the construction industry and has seen it all.”
  • In a conversation about military service, someone might say, “My grandfather is a veteran who served in World War II.”
  • A person might refer to an elderly doctor as a “medical veteran” to highlight their extensive experience.
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33. Grandpa

The term “grandpa” is an informal and affectionate way to refer to one’s grandfather, typically used by grandchildren.

  • For example, “I love spending time with my grandpa. He always tells the best stories.”
  • In a discussion about family, someone might say, “My grandpa is my hero and has always been there for me.”
  • A person might refer to their elderly neighbor as “Grandpa Smith” to show respect and familiarity.

34. Granddad

Similar to “grandpa,” “granddad” is another informal and affectionate term used to refer to one’s grandfather.

  • For instance, “My granddad taught me how to fish when I was a kid, and it’s a memory I’ll always cherish.”
  • In a conversation about family traditions, someone might say, “Every Christmas, my granddad tells us stories about his childhood.”
  • A person might affectionately say, “I miss my granddad. He was such a wise and loving man.”

35. Grandfather

“Grandfather” is a formal term used to refer to one’s paternal or maternal grandfather.

  • For example, “My grandfather served in the military and was a true hero.”
  • In a discussion about family history, someone might say, “My great-grandfather and my grandfather were both farmers.”
  • A person might refer to their elderly relative as “my grandfather” when introducing them to someone new.

36. Papa

Papa is a term used to refer to one’s father or grandfather. It is a casual and affectionate way to address an older man in the family.

  • For example, a child might say, “I love spending time with my papa.”
  • A person might introduce their grandfather as, “This is my papa, John.”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might mention, “My papa taught me how to ride a bike when I was young.”

37. Pappy

Pappy is a colloquial term used to refer to an older man or grandfather. It is often used with familiarity and affection.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m going to visit my pappy this weekend.”
  • A person might introduce their grandfather as, “This is my pappy, Robert.”
  • In a discussion about family, someone might share, “My pappy always tells the best stories about his youth.”

38. Pop

Pop is a slang term used to refer to one’s father or grandfather. It is a casual and endearing way to address an older man in the family.

  • For example, a child might say, “I’m going to the park with my pop.”
  • A person might introduce their grandfather as, “This is my pop, Richard.”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might mention, “My pop taught me how to fish when I was a kid.”

39. Poppy

Poppy is a term used to refer to one’s grandfather. It is a sweet and affectionate way to address an older man in the family.

  • For instance, a child might say, “I love spending time with my poppy.”
  • A person might introduce their grandfather as, “This is my poppy, William.”
  • In a discussion about family, someone might share, “My poppy always gives the best hugs.”

40. Daddy

Daddy is a slang term used to refer to one’s father or an older man. It can be used with affection or as a term of endearment.

  • For example, a child might say, “I missed you, daddy!”
  • A person might refer to their father as, “My daddy is the best.”
  • In a conversation about older men, someone might comment, “That daddy over there is handsome.”

41. Dad

This term is used to refer to one’s own father or a father-like figure. It can also be used more broadly to refer to any older man in a paternal role.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going to visit my dad this weekend.”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might ask, “How is your dad doing?”
  • A person might refer to their boss as “the dad of the office” if they are seen as a mentor or authority figure.
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42. Father

This term refers to a male parent or someone who has a paternal role. It can also be used more broadly to refer to any older man in a respected role.

  • For instance, a person might say, “My father taught me how to ride a bike.”
  • In a discussion about family dynamics, one might say, “Fathers play an important role in a child’s development.”
  • A person might refer to a wise and respected older man as “a father figure.”

43. Elder statesman

This term is used to describe an older man who is highly respected and has a lot of experience in a particular field or area of expertise. It often implies wisdom, leadership, and a sense of authority.

  • For example, in politics, an elder statesman might be a former president or a long-serving senator who is still influential in their party.
  • In a discussion about a company, someone might say, “He is the elder statesman of our organization, with decades of experience.”
  • A person might refer to a respected professor as “the elder statesman of academia.”

44. Old master

This term is used to describe an older man who is highly skilled and experienced in a particular craft or profession. It often implies mastery, expertise, and a high level of accomplishment.

  • For instance, in the art world, an old master refers to a renowned artist from the past who has achieved a high level of skill and recognition.
  • In a discussion about music, someone might say, “He is an old master of the guitar, with decades of experience.”
  • A person might refer to a skilled carpenter as “the old master of woodworking.”

45. Old guard

This term is used to describe an older man who represents traditional values and practices. It often implies a resistance to change and a preference for established ways of doing things.

  • For example, in politics, the old guard might refer to long-serving politicians who are resistant to new ideas or reforms.
  • In a discussion about a company, someone might say, “The old guard is resistant to adopting new technologies.”
  • A person might refer to a traditionalist or conservative as “an old guard thinker.”

46. Old Man Winter

This term refers to the coldest and harshest time of the year, typically during the winter season. “Old Man Winter” personifies the weather conditions and the challenges it brings.

  • For example, “Old Man Winter has arrived, and it’s time to bundle up and stay warm.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t wait for Old Man Winter to be over and for spring to arrive.”
  • In a discussion about extreme weather, someone might mention, “Old Man Winter can bring heavy snowstorms and freezing temperatures.”

47. Senex

This term is derived from Latin and refers to an old man, often used in a formal or literary context. “Senex” is used to describe an elderly man with wisdom and experience.

  • For instance, in a novel, the author might describe a character as “a wise senex.”
  • In a conversation about respecting the elderly, someone might say, “We should always listen to the advice of our senex.”
  • A person discussing intergenerational relationships might mention, “There is much to learn from the senex in our society.”

48. Top Dog

This term is used to describe a man who holds a position of authority or influence. “Top Dog” refers to someone who is highly respected or regarded as the best in a particular field.

  • For example, in a business context, someone might say, “He’s the top dog in the company, making all the important decisions.”
  • In a discussion about sports, a fan might say, “He’s the top dog in tennis, winning multiple Grand Slam titles.”
  • A person discussing leadership might mention, “Being the top dog comes with great responsibility and the need to lead by example.”