Top 33 Slang For Old Person – Meaning & Usage

As we navigate through the ever-evolving landscape of language, it's important to stay current with the latest trends, including slang terms that are constantly shaping our conversations. When it comes to referring to the older generation, there's a whole array of colorful and sometimes humorous expressions that have gained popularity. **Curious to learn what these slang terms are?** Join us as we unravel the top **slang for old person** that will not only entertain but also enlighten you on the diverse ways people express themselves. Get ready to chuckle and maybe even adopt a few of these phrases into your own lexicon!

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1. Geezer

– For example, “My grandpa is such a funny geezer.”

  • Someone might say, “Watch out for that old geezer crossing the street.”
  • In a conversation about age, a person might jokingly say, “I’m not quite a geezer yet, but I’m getting there.”

2. Senior citizen

– For instance, “Many senior citizens enjoy playing golf as a hobby.”

  • A person might say, “I recently became a senior citizen and now qualify for certain discounts.”
  • In a discussion about retirement, someone might ask, “What age do you become a senior citizen?”

3. Old-timer

– For example, “The old-timer at the hardware store knew exactly what I needed.”

  • A person might say, “I love listening to the stories of old-timers who have lived through significant historical events.”
  • In a conversation about traditions, someone might say, “Let’s ask the old-timers how things used to be done.”

4. Elderly

– For instance, “The elderly couple enjoys taking walks in the park.”

  • A person might say, “We need to take extra care of the elderly population during the winter months.”
  • In a discussion about healthcare, someone might mention, “There are specific programs and services available for the elderly.”

5. Golden ager

– For example, “Many golden agers travel and explore new hobbies.”

  • A person might say, “My grandparents are living their best lives as golden agers.”
  • In a conversation about active lifestyles, someone might say, “I hope to be a golden ager who stays physically fit and mentally sharp.”

6. Old fogey

An old fogey is a term used to describe someone who is seen as old-fashioned or set in their ways. It is often used in a playful or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, “My grandpa is such an old fogey. He still insists on using a flip phone.”
  • In a conversation about fashion trends, someone might say, “I don’t understand why people still wear bell-bottoms. Are they all old fogeys?”
  • A person jokingly referring to themselves might say, “I’m turning into an old fogey. I can’t keep up with all these new technologies.”

7. Oldster

Oldster is a colloquial term used to refer to an elderly person. It is a relatively neutral term that simply signifies someone who is older in age.

  • For instance, “The retirement home is filled with oldsters enjoying their golden years.”
  • In a discussion about ageism, someone might argue, “We shouldn’t dismiss the opinions of oldsters. They have valuable life experience.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not looking forward to becoming an oldster, but I hope to age gracefully.”

8. Senior

Senior is a commonly used term to refer to an elderly person. It is a more formal and respectful term compared to some slang alternatives.

  • For example, “Many seniors enjoy participating in social activities at their local community center.”
  • In a conversation about retirement planning, someone might say, “Seniors should carefully consider their financial options for a comfortable retirement.”
  • A person might comment, “I admire the wisdom and resilience of seniors. They have so much to teach us.”

9. Geriatric

Geriatric is a medical term used to describe the branch of medicine that focuses on the health and care of elderly individuals. It is also used informally to refer to elderly people in general.

  • For instance, “The geriatric ward at the hospital specializes in caring for older patients.”
  • In a discussion about healthcare for the elderly, someone might say, “We need to invest more in geriatric medicine to support our aging population.”
  • A person might comment, “My grandma is in her 90s, but she’s still as active as ever. Age is just a number for some geriatrics!”

10. Old coot

Old coot is a term used to describe a grumpy or eccentric older person. It is often used in a playful or affectionate manner.

  • For example, “The old coot next door always yells at kids who step on his lawn.”
  • In a conversation about quirky neighbors, someone might say, “I have this old coot living in my building who collects vintage soda cans.”
  • A person jokingly referring to themselves might say, “I might be turning into an old coot. I find myself complaining about everything these days.”

11. Ancient

This term is used to describe someone who is very old, often implying a sense of wisdom or antiquity. It can be used both affectionately and derogatorily.

  • For example, “Grandma is an ancient, but she still has a sharp wit.”
  • In a conversation about historical figures, someone might say, “Socrates was an ancient philosopher who greatly influenced Western thought.”
  • A person discussing a long-standing tradition might say, “This ancient ritual has been passed down for centuries.”

12. Codger

This term is used to describe an old person, often with the implication that they are eccentric or set in their ways. It can be used playfully or derogatorily.

  • For instance, “The old codger down the street always yells at kids to get off his lawn.”
  • In a discussion about quirky characters, someone might say, “The show is filled with hilarious codgers who provide comic relief.”
  • A person describing an encounter might say, “I met a friendly codger at the park who told me stories about his adventures.”

13. Old codger

This term is a variation of “codger” and is used to describe an old person, often with the implication that they are eccentric or set in their ways. It can be used playfully or derogatorily.

  • For example, “The old codger down the street always yells at kids to get off his lawn.”
  • In a discussion about quirky characters, someone might say, “The show is filled with hilarious old codgers who provide comic relief.”
  • A person describing an encounter might say, “I met a friendly old codger at the park who told me stories about his adventures.”

14. Oldie

This term is a simple and informal way to refer to an old person. It can be used affectionately or casually.

  • For instance, “My grandparents are such sweet oldies.”
  • In a conversation about aging, someone might say, “I hope to be a healthy oldie when I reach that stage of life.”
  • A person describing a group might say, “The retirement home is filled with lively oldies who enjoy socializing.”

15. Old fogie

This term is used to describe an old person who is perceived as being old-fashioned or resistant to change. It can be used playfully or derogatorily.

  • For example, “My dad is such an old fogie, he still prefers to write letters instead of using email.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “Old fogies often struggle to adapt to new gadgets and apps.”
  • A person describing a conservative individual might say, “He’s an old fogie who believes in traditional values.”

16. Old hand

Refers to someone who is experienced or skilled in a particular field or activity.

  • For example, “He’s an old hand at playing the guitar.”
  • In a discussion about a specific sport, someone might say, “I’m still learning, but he’s definitely an old hand at basketball.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Can you show me how to do this task? You’re an old hand at it.”

17. Old school

Describes something or someone that is traditional, old-fashioned, or adheres to old methods or ideas.

  • For instance, “He prefers listening to vinyl records, he’s old school.”
  • In a conversation about education, someone might say, “I believe in old school teaching methods.”
  • A person might comment, “I like her style, she has an old school fashion sense.”

18. Old soul

Refers to a person, typically young, who has a deep understanding or appreciation of things associated with an older generation.

  • For example, “She’s only 20, but she’s such an old soul.”
  • In a discussion about music, someone might say, “He has a collection of vinyl records, he’s definitely an old soul.”
  • A friend might comment, “You have an old soul, you always seem to understand things beyond your age.”

19. Old bird

A term used to affectionately refer to an older person, typically in a friendly and informal manner.

  • For instance, “My grandma is such a lovely old bird.”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might say, “I’m going to visit my favorite old bird, my grandpa.”
  • A person might comment, “I love spending time with old birds, they have so many interesting stories to share.”

20. Old goat

A term used to affectionately refer to an older person, often with a sense of humor or endearment.

  • For example, “He’s a grumpy old goat, but we love him.”
  • In a discussion about family, someone might say, “My uncle is a funny old goat.”
  • A friend might comment, “You’re such an old goat, always cracking jokes and making us laugh.”

21. Old man/woman

This term refers to someone who is advanced in age. It is a common way to refer to an older man or woman, often used in a casual or familiar manner.

  • For example, “I saw an old man walking his dog in the park.”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might say, “My old woman is turning 80 next month.”
  • A person reminiscing about their childhood might say, “I remember my old man teaching me how to ride a bike.”

22. Wrinkly

This term is used to describe someone who has a lot of wrinkles on their skin, often due to aging. It can be used playfully or affectionately, but it can also be considered disrespectful or offensive in some contexts.

  • For instance, “Look at that wrinkly old lady sitting on the bench.”
  • In a humorous conversation about getting older, someone might say, “I’m starting to get a few wrinkles myself. Guess I’m becoming a wrinkly.”
  • A person might affectionately tease their grandparent by saying, “You’re getting more wrinkly every time I see you!”

23. Silver fox

This term is used to describe an older man who is considered attractive, particularly if he has gray or silver hair. It is often used in a positive and admiring way.

  • For example, “George Clooney is the ultimate silver fox.”
  • In a conversation about older celebrities, someone might say, “Brad Pitt is aging like a silver fox.”
  • A person might compliment their partner by saying, “You’re becoming quite the silver fox with that gray hair.”

24. Blue hair

This term is used to describe an older person who dyes their hair blue or has naturally blue-tinted hair due to age. It is often used in a lighthearted or teasing manner.

  • For instance, “Did you see that blue hair sitting at the front of the bus?”
  • In a conversation about unconventional hair colors, someone might say, “I’ve always wanted to dye my hair blue when I become a blue hair.”
  • A person might playfully joke with their grandparent by saying, “You should join the blue hair club!”

25. Granny

This term is a colloquial and affectionate way to refer to an older woman, particularly a grandmother. It is often used by family members or close friends.

  • For example, “I’m going to visit my granny this weekend.”
  • In a conversation about family traditions, someone might say, “My granny makes the best apple pie.”
  • A person might introduce their friend to their granny by saying, “This is my good friend, Sarah. She’s like a second granny to me.”

26. Old biddy

This term is often used to describe an older woman, typically one who is seen as fussy or nosy. It can be used affectionately or derogatorily, depending on the context.

  • For example, someone might say, “My old biddy neighbor always complains about the noise.”
  • In a comedic TV show, a character might refer to their grandmother as “the old biddy.”
  • A person reminiscing about their childhood might say, “I remember when the old biddies used to gather at the park and feed the ducks.”

27. OAP (Old Age Pensioner)

This acronym stands for “Old Age Pensioner” and refers to someone who is retired and receiving a pension. It is commonly used in the United Kingdom.

  • For instance, a news article might discuss the challenges faced by OAPs in accessing healthcare.
  • In a conversation about retirement, someone might ask, “When do you become eligible to be an OAP?”
  • A person might say, “My grandparents are OAPs and love to travel.”

28. Old duffer

This term is used to describe an older man, often one who is seen as eccentric or slow-witted. It can be used playfully or derogatorily.

  • For example, someone might say, “That old duffer always forgets where he left his keys.”
  • In a comedy movie, a character might refer to their grandfather as “the old duffer.”
  • A person sharing a funny story might say, “I once saw an old duffer trying to parallel park for half an hour.”

29. Old chap

This term is used to refer to an older man in a friendly and respectful way. It is often associated with British English.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Good morning, old chap. How are you today?”
  • In a conversation about etiquette, a person might mention, “It’s considered polite to hold the door open for an old chap.”
  • A character in a novel set in the early 20th century might say, “I met an old chap at the pub who told me fascinating stories about his travels.”

30. Old dame

This term is used to describe an older woman, often one who is seen as refined or sophisticated. It can be used affectionately or derogatorily, depending on the context.

  • For example, someone might say, “The old dame always dresses impeccably.”
  • In a conversation about classic Hollywood actresses, a person might mention, “Katharine Hepburn was a true old dame.”
  • A person recalling their grandmother’s cooking might say, “My grandma was a fantastic old dame in the kitchen.”

31. Silver surfer

The term “silver surfer” refers to an older individual who is adept at navigating and using the internet. It is often used to describe older adults who have embraced technology and are comfortable using computers, smartphones, and other digital devices.

  • For example, “My grandma is a silver surfer. She’s always posting on social media and even has her own blog.”
  • A person might say, “I’m impressed by how tech-savvy my grandpa is. He’s a real silver surfer.”
  • In a discussion about the digital divide, someone might mention, “Silver surfers are breaking down barriers and proving that age is not a barrier to using technology.”

32. Methuselah

The term “Methuselah” is used to describe someone who is extremely old, typically in a playful or lighthearted manner. It is derived from the biblical figure Methuselah, who is said to have lived for 969 years.

  • For instance, if someone is celebrating their 100th birthday, they might be jokingly referred to as a Methuselah.
  • A person might say, “My great-grandmother is a real Methuselah. She’s lived through so many historical events.”
  • In a conversation about longevity, someone might comment, “Living to be a Methuselah is quite an accomplishment.”

33. Old bean

The term “old bean” is a friendly and affectionate way to refer to an older person. It is often used as a term of endearment or camaraderie.

  • For example, “Hey, old bean, how’s it going?”
  • A person might say, “I love spending time with my grandparents. They’re my favorite old beans.”
  • In a conversation about respecting elders, someone might mention, “It’s important to show kindness and respect to our old beans.”
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